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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Robert Gary (search for this): article 1
ued the case until this morning. Rebecca Chandler, a white girl, was arraigned for trespassing on the premises of Robert Gary, and destroying his property. It appeared that to get to her residence she has to pass through the garden of Gary, anGary, and while in the act of so doing, a few nights since, with a companion, the couple were ordered out by Gary — a command which they refused to obey, and retorted on him by pulling up and throwing at his person a few turnips, and perhaps other vegetablesGary — a command which they refused to obey, and retorted on him by pulling up and throwing at his person a few turnips, and perhaps other vegetables. Thus was Gary's property destroyed by the erratic Miss Chandler. The Mayor announced his intention of sending her to jail, but it is presumed he did not. Edward, slave of John D. Quarles, was ordered to be whipped for throwing stones in the Gary's property destroyed by the erratic Miss Chandler. The Mayor announced his intention of sending her to jail, but it is presumed he did not. Edward, slave of John D. Quarles, was ordered to be whipped for throwing stones in the streets. It is a pity the Mayor did not have the power to order a good many of the white urchins the same punishment for similar offence
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
Mayor's Court, yesterday. --Patrick Finnoven, alias James Coyne, an ill-featured looking customer pretending to hall from Nashville, Tennessee, underwent yesterday another partial examination before the Mayor for robbing Ashbury Inber of $750, a watch, and pistol. The witness, an honest, simple looking chap, identified the accused as one of your men who assaulted, robbed him, and after wards recovered his watch, and pistol from him; but the money had been handed over to a confederate. One hundred dollars in gold was found on Finnoven, no doubt the nett proceeds of the robbery. The Mayor had determined at one time to send the accused on to a called courte; but, for the purpose of getting additional evidence, continued the case until this morning. Rebecca Chandler, a white girl, was arraigned for trespassing on the premises of Robert Gary, and destroying his property. It appeared that to get to her residence she has to pass through the garden of Gary, and while in the act
Runaway-- $25 reward. Run away from the subscriber, a negro Boy, named Arthur, about fifteen years old, very black, with pop eyes, bushy hair, and a scared, furtive look. The above reward will be paid on his apprehension and delivery to me. mh 18--2t* J. B. McCAW.
J. B. McCaw (search for this): article 1
Runaway-- $25 reward. Run away from the subscriber, a negro Boy, named Arthur, about fifteen years old, very black, with pop eyes, bushy hair, and a scared, furtive look. The above reward will be paid on his apprehension and delivery to me. mh 18--2t* J. B. McCAW.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
Rumors. Yesterday a report was circulated on the streets to the effect that Leesburg had been evacuated, that the Federal troops had recrossed into Maryland, and that there were indications of an outbreak in Maryland, which caused the Heltha at Washington to tremble in their shoes. Where this report originated, or upon what it was founded, we were enable to learn after the most diligent inquiry. We hope it may be correct, but are rather disposed to believe that it was started by some oneoutbreak in Maryland, which caused the Heltha at Washington to tremble in their shoes. Where this report originated, or upon what it was founded, we were enable to learn after the most diligent inquiry. We hope it may be correct, but are rather disposed to believe that it was started by some one with whom the wish was father to the thought. Other rumors, wanting confirmation, and as little likely, to be correct, were in circulation, but we think it unnecessary to mention them in detail.
particulars of the affair. Apparently those most reliable assert that our forces engaged consisted of five skeleton regiments of infantry, a few companies of artillery, and a battalion which came upon the scene of action in time to help cover our retreat. The enemy was 22,000 strong, provided with formidable gunboats on the flank, and formidable field batteries in front, with a heavy reserve. Our entire force is probably over estimated at 5,000, yet they hold, their ground in the face of the great odds for full five hours.--The militia gave way first, and retreated. Our loss in killed and wounded is estimated to be between 100 and 150. The Federal loss is variously stated at from 800 to 1000. The only troops engaged on our side were North Carolinains. Col. Avery and Maj Hoke were both killed. Col. Haywood was not killed, as at first reported. A flag of truce has been sent down, and is expected to return soon, when a full and correct report of the casualties will be obtained.
particulars of the affair. Apparently those most reliable assert that our forces engaged consisted of five skeleton regiments of infantry, a few companies of artillery, and a battalion which came upon the scene of action in time to help cover our retreat. The enemy was 22,000 strong, provided with formidable gunboats on the flank, and formidable field batteries in front, with a heavy reserve. Our entire force is probably over estimated at 5,000, yet they hold, their ground in the face of the great odds for full five hours.--The militia gave way first, and retreated. Our loss in killed and wounded is estimated to be between 100 and 150. The Federal loss is variously stated at from 800 to 1000. The only troops engaged on our side were North Carolinains. Col. Avery and Maj Hoke were both killed. Col. Haywood was not killed, as at first reported. A flag of truce has been sent down, and is expected to return soon, when a full and correct report of the casualties will be obtained.
particulars of the affair. Apparently those most reliable assert that our forces engaged consisted of five skeleton regiments of infantry, a few companies of artillery, and a battalion which came upon the scene of action in time to help cover our retreat. The enemy was 22,000 strong, provided with formidable gunboats on the flank, and formidable field batteries in front, with a heavy reserve. Our entire force is probably over estimated at 5,000, yet they hold, their ground in the face of the great odds for full five hours.--The militia gave way first, and retreated. Our loss in killed and wounded is estimated to be between 100 and 150. The Federal loss is variously stated at from 800 to 1000. The only troops engaged on our side were North Carolinains. Col. Avery and Maj Hoke were both killed. Col. Haywood was not killed, as at first reported. A flag of truce has been sent down, and is expected to return soon, when a full and correct report of the casualties will be obtained.
particulars of the affair. Apparently those most reliable assert that our forces engaged consisted of five skeleton regiments of infantry, a few companies of artillery, and a battalion which came upon the scene of action in time to help cover our retreat. The enemy was 22,000 strong, provided with formidable gunboats on the flank, and formidable field batteries in front, with a heavy reserve. Our entire force is probably over estimated at 5,000, yet they hold, their ground in the face of the great odds for full five hours.--The militia gave way first, and retreated. Our loss in killed and wounded is estimated to be between 100 and 150. The Federal loss is variously stated at from 800 to 1000. The only troops engaged on our side were North Carolinains. Col. Avery and Maj Hoke were both killed. Col. Haywood was not killed, as at first reported. A flag of truce has been sent down, and is expected to return soon, when a full and correct report of the casualties will be obtained.
March 17th (search for this): article 1
The battle at Newbern. Wilmington, N. C., March 17. --Further details of the battle at Newbern have been received. The reports vary very materially as to the particulars of the affair. Apparently those most reliable assert that our forces engaged consisted of five skeleton regiments of infantry, a few companies of artillery, and a battalion which came upon the scene of action in time to help cover our retreat. The enemy was 22,000 strong, provided with formidable gunboats on the flank, and formidable field batteries in front, with a heavy reserve. Our entire force is probably over estimated at 5,000, yet they hold, their ground in the face of the great odds for full five hours.--The militia gave way first, and retreated. Our loss in killed and wounded is estimated to be between 100 and 150. The Federal loss is variously stated at from 800 to 1000. The only troops engaged on our side were North Carolinains. Col. Avery and Maj Hoke were both killed. Col. Haywood was n
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