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Coahoma County (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 1
ter at once lay down our arms and quit the contest. The Staunton Spectator remarks: Every planter owes to his neighbors and to his country to plant all the corn he can, and to make as little cotton and tobacco as possible. The soldiers must have meat and bread, and their families at home must be provided for. Plant corn ! it is the staff of life. A good corn crop this year will do more for the South than anything else. A Defiant spirit. Capt. B. F. Saunders, of Coahoma county, Miss., who lost one of his arms in the Mexican war, is among the Fort Donelson prisoners.--The Memphis Avalanche says that when his sword was demanded by the Federals he refused to surrender it. A squad of armed soldiers were ordered to disarm him of it, when he, defiantly, sticking it in the ground, and by the aid of his foot severed the blade, and throwing it as far as he could, said to them "now, d — n you, if you want it, go and get it" Abandoning their homes. The Fredericksb
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
the resolution passed by Congress recommending planters to refrain from the production of cotton his year and apply themselves vigorously to the production of grain, the Raleigh State Journal says: The subject needs no argument. If the people of the South want independence, they must work for it. The cotton plant is their chief weapon, and they now know how best to employ it. They must rely solely upon themselves for food during the continuance of the war. The States of Kentucky and Tennessee cannot be relied on for a pound of bread or announce of meat. To prevent starvation, then, and to sustain their armeis in the field demands of them the employment of their means to procure the necessaries of life. Abandon cotton, then, and produce bread. It is no use to mince matters. If the cultivation of cotton be not abandoned for the present, and breadstuffs be raised instead we are a conquered people, and had far better at once lay down our arms and quit the contest. The Stau
Kinston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
e they could desire. But they rallied as quickly as any routed body of soldiers ever did or could. They are not demoralized in the slightest. They are again ready to meet the enemy, and are anxious to do so? It is an abominable falsehood to say they behaved badly. No body of troops ever fought with greater gallantry. The losses have been ridiculously exaggerated. The loss in killed will not exceed 50, we think; nor will the number captured reach over 100, if the late reports from Kinston be correct. The only field officer killed or wounded is Maj. Carmichael, of the 26th regiment, killed — unless the rumor that Colonel Avery, of the 23d, is wounded should turn out to be correct, which we do not credit — We incline to the belief that he is captured, and, we fear, a considerable portion of his command. Several company officers are sold to be killed and wounded, but there is no certainly of it as yet. Several pieces of artillery were saved, a complete section of Captain
Mount Jackson (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ourselves from greater evils than any we have suffered, that we have girded on the sword. Loathing the vile creatures, whose offences smell to Heaven; proud of the heritage bequeathed us by our fathers; nerved by the remembrance of brilliant successes; assured of our ability to accomplish the work we have begun, we stand to our arms, resolved to conquer. The Valley. The Staunton Spectator says: Gen. Thomas J. Jackson has moved the "Stonewall" from Winchester to Mount Jackson, in Shenandoah county, where he will give the enemy fight if they pursue him to that place. The militia are flocking in great numbers to his assistance, and in a few days he will have a strong force, in numbers at least, if not in efficiency. The militia are brave, and, if furnished with arms, will do good execution. The production of grain. Alluding to the resolution passed by Congress recommending planters to refrain from the production of cotton his year and apply themselves vigorous
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
Notes of the War. The Raleigh (N. C.) State Journal corrects some of the rumors that have been set afloat in connection with the fall of Newbern, as follows: Our troops have neither been all fettled nor captured at Newbern. They were routed, it is true. Forty-five hundred men could not withstand a body of twenty thousand well-armed and disciplined troops, with every appliance they could desire. But they rallied as quickly as any routed body of soldiers ever did or could. They are not demoralized in the slightest. They are again ready to meet the enemy, and are anxious to do so? It is an abominable falsehood to say they behaved badly. No body of troops ever fought with greater gallantry. The losses have been ridiculously exaggerated. The loss in killed will not exceed 50, we think; nor will the number captured reach over 100, if the late reports from Kinston be correct. The only field officer killed or wounded is Maj. Carmichael, of the 26th regiment, killed —
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
Notes of the War. The Raleigh (N. C.) State Journal corrects some of the rumors that have been set afloat in connection with the fall of Newbern, as follows: Our troops have neither been all fettled nor captured at Newbern. They were routed, it is true. Forty-five hundred men could not withstand a body of twenty thousNewbern. They were routed, it is true. Forty-five hundred men could not withstand a body of twenty thousand well-armed and disciplined troops, with every appliance they could desire. But they rallied as quickly as any routed body of soldiers ever did or could. They are not demoralized in the slightest. They are again ready to meet the enemy, and are anxious to do so? It is an abominable falsehood to say they behaved badly. No botock of the Atlantic Railroad were brought away, and it is asserted that all the cotton and naval stores in the town were burnt before the enemy took possession. Newbern The Burials of M'Culloch. The following is the general order in regard to the interment of the remains of the gallant McCulloch: Fort Smith, March 9, 1
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
he staff of life. A good corn crop this year will do more for the South than anything else. A Defiant spirit. Capt. B. F. Saunders, of Coahoma county, Miss., who lost one of his arms in the Mexican war, is among the Fort Donelson prisoners.--The Memphis Avalanche says that when his sword was demanded by the Federals he refused to surrender it. A squad of armed soldiers were ordered to disarm him of it, when he, defiantly, sticking it in the ground, and by the aid of his foot severed the blade, and throwing it as far as he could, said to them "now, d — n you, if you want it, go and get it" Abandoning their homes. The Fredericksburg Herald hears of many large farmers in the upper country who have left their beautiful estates, and with the negroes have gone further into the interior. Families from Londoun, Fauquier and Culpeper, have been impelled to these hasty retreats from hearthstones dear to them and their little ones, by the approach of the ruthless invader.
Stonewall (search for this): article 1
they have inflected upon us, and to protect ourselves from greater evils than any we have suffered, that we have girded on the sword. Loathing the vile creatures, whose offences smell to Heaven; proud of the heritage bequeathed us by our fathers; nerved by the remembrance of brilliant successes; assured of our ability to accomplish the work we have begun, we stand to our arms, resolved to conquer. The Valley. The Staunton Spectator says: Gen. Thomas J. Jackson has moved the "Stonewall" from Winchester to Mount Jackson, in Shenandoah county, where he will give the enemy fight if they pursue him to that place. The militia are flocking in great numbers to his assistance, and in a few days he will have a strong force, in numbers at least, if not in efficiency. The militia are brave, and, if furnished with arms, will do good execution. The production of grain. Alluding to the resolution passed by Congress recommending planters to refrain from the production of co
McCulloch (search for this): article 1
ordered by the people to leave the State, if the authorities at Richmond refuse or neglect to remove him." All the engines and rolling stock of the Atlantic Railroad were brought away, and it is asserted that all the cotton and naval stores in the town were burnt before the enemy took possession. Newbern The Burials of M'Culloch. The following is the general order in regard to the interment of the remains of the gallant McCulloch: Fort Smith, March 9, 1862.--The brave General McCulloch is no longer on earth. He fell while bravely fighting at the head of his division, in a hardly contested battle with the enemy near Cross Hollows, on the 7th inst. His remains will be interred with military honors, on Monday at 12 o'clock. The officers and troops of the command will hold themselves in readiness to perform this melancholy duty. Officers of this command will report in person at the Adjutant's office, at nine o'clock. Sojourning officers of the army are invited to parti
Thomas J. Jackson (search for this): article 1
to punish them for the injuries they have inflected upon us, and to protect ourselves from greater evils than any we have suffered, that we have girded on the sword. Loathing the vile creatures, whose offences smell to Heaven; proud of the heritage bequeathed us by our fathers; nerved by the remembrance of brilliant successes; assured of our ability to accomplish the work we have begun, we stand to our arms, resolved to conquer. The Valley. The Staunton Spectator says: Gen. Thomas J. Jackson has moved the "Stonewall" from Winchester to Mount Jackson, in Shenandoah county, where he will give the enemy fight if they pursue him to that place. The militia are flocking in great numbers to his assistance, and in a few days he will have a strong force, in numbers at least, if not in efficiency. The militia are brave, and, if furnished with arms, will do good execution. The production of grain. Alluding to the resolution passed by Congress recommending planters to re
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