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United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
anticipation of the Merrimac's reappearance.--During all Sunday morning, while the battle was raging between the two iron-clad vessels, the high cliffs of Newport News and vicinity were crowded with spectators, earnestly watching the progress of the fight. War Gazette. Executive Mansion, Washington, January 27th, 1862. President's General War Order, No. 1. Ordered, that the 22d day of February, 1862, be the day for a general movement of the land and naval forces of the United States against the insurgent forces. That especially, The army at and about Fortress Monroe, The army of the Potomac, The army of Western Virginia. The army near Munfordsville, Ky., The army and flotilla at Cairo, And a naval force in the Gulf of Mexico, be ready for a movement on that day. That all other forces, both land and naval, with their respective commanders, obey existing orders for the time, and be ready to obey additional orders when duly given
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 5
o of spiked guns. So, much for 'strategy!' So much for the comprehensive 'plans' of George B. McClellan! So much for the terrible 'anaconda' which was to crush rebellion in its fold! How long the foe has been gone, nobody can conjecture. But for the fact that the President and the Secretary of War fairly drove him into a movement, on pain of wresting from him his bottom, it is doubtful whether McClellan would have discovered the absence of the enemy till midsummer." Bloody fight in Mexico — the Texans Victorious. The following is the Yankee version of the battle in New Mexico, heretofore alluded to, in which a decided success attended the Confederate arms: St. Louis, March 13. --The Republican has advices from Albuquerque, New Mexico, to February 23d, giving details of a recent battle at Fort Craig. The figat commenced on the morning of the 21st, between a portion of our troops, under Col. Roberts, and the enemy, across the Rio Grande, with varied success, u
Albuquerque (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): article 5
that the President and the Secretary of War fairly drove him into a movement, on pain of wresting from him his bottom, it is doubtful whether McClellan would have discovered the absence of the enemy till midsummer." Bloody fight in Mexico — the Texans Victorious. The following is the Yankee version of the battle in New Mexico, heretofore alluded to, in which a decided success attended the Confederate arms: St. Louis, March 13. --The Republican has advices from Albuquerque, New Mexico, to February 23d, giving details of a recent battle at Fort Craig. The figat commenced on the morning of the 21st, between a portion of our troops, under Col. Roberts, and the enemy, across the Rio Grande, with varied success, until 2 o'clock, Col. Canby then crossed the river in force with a battery of six pieces, under Capt. McCray of the cavalry, but detailed in command of the battery — He had also a small battery of two howitzers. The enemy are supposed to have had eight piece
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
e might be grappled to and towed ashore. These and other reasons may suffice to show why the Monitor did not follow among the batteries of Craney Island and Norfolk. Gen. Wool, I understand, has ordered all the women and children away from Fortress Monroe, in anticipation of the Merrimac's reappearance.--During all Sunday morning, while the battle was raging between the two iron-clad vessels, the high cliffs of Newport News and vicinity were crowded with spectators, earnestly watching the pros General War Order, No. 1. Ordered, that the 22d day of February, 1862, be the day for a general movement of the land and naval forces of the United States against the insurgent forces. That especially, The army at and about Fortress Monroe, The army of the Potomac, The army of Western Virginia. The army near Munfordsville, Ky., The army and flotilla at Cairo, And a naval force in the Gulf of Mexico, be ready for a movement on that day. That all ot
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): article 5
utive Mansion, Washington, January 27th, 1862. President's General War Order, No. 1. Ordered, that the 22d day of February, 1862, be the day for a general movement of the land and naval forces of the United States against the insurgent forces. That especially, The army at and about Fortress Monroe, The army of the Potomac, The army of Western Virginia. The army near Munfordsville, Ky., The army and flotilla at Cairo, And a naval force in the Gulf of Mexico, be ready for a movement on that day. That all other forces, both land and naval, with their respective commanders, obey existing orders for the time, and be ready to obey additional orders when duly given. That the heads of departments, and capitally the Secretaries of War and of the Navy; with all their subordinates, and the General-in-Chief, with all other commanders, and subordinates of land and navel forces, will severally be held to their strict and full responsibilities
Paraje (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): article 5
ment, on pain of wresting from him his bottom, it is doubtful whether McClellan would have discovered the absence of the enemy till midsummer." Bloody fight in Mexico — the Texans Victorious. The following is the Yankee version of the battle in New Mexico, heretofore alluded to, in which a decided success attended the Confederate arms: St. Louis, March 13. --The Republican has advices from Albuquerque, New Mexico, to February 23d, giving details of a recent battle at Fort Craig. The figat commenced on the morning of the 21st, between a portion of our troops, under Col. Roberts, and the enemy, across the Rio Grande, with varied success, until 2 o'clock, Col. Canby then crossed the river in force with a battery of six pieces, under Capt. McCray of the cavalry, but detailed in command of the battery — He had also a small battery of two howitzers. The enemy are supposed to have had eight pieces. The battle was commenced by the artillery and skirmishers, and soon b
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): article 5
f the battery — He had also a small battery of two howitzers. The enemy are supposed to have had eight pieces. The battle was commenced by the artillery and skirmishers, and soon became general. Towards evening most of the enemy's guns were alleged. They however, made a desperate charge on the Howitzer battery, but were repulsed with great loss. Captain McCray's battery was defended by Captain Plumpton's company of United States infantry, and a portion of Colonel Pino's regiment of Mexican volunteers. The Texan rebels charged furiously and desperately with their picked men about six hundred strong. They were armed with carbines, revolvers, and long seven pound bowie-knives. After discharging their carbines at close distance, they drew their revolvers and reached the battery amid a storm of grape and cannister. The Mexicans of Pino's regiment now became panic stricken and ingloriously fled. Captain Plumpton and his infantry bravely stood their ground and fought nobly unti
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
From the North. [The following interesting statement of the great naval battle in Hampton Roads was prepared for Monday's paper, but unavoidably postponed until this morning. It was furnished to the New York World by A. B. Smith, pilot on board the Cumberland at the time of the battle, and is by far the most candid account that has yet been received from a Yankee source.] The battle of Hampton Roads. On Saturday morning the U. S. sloop-of war Cumberland laid off in the Roads at Newport News, about 800 yards from the shore, the Congress being 200 yards south of us. The morning was mild and pleasant, and the day opened without any note worthy incident. About 11 o'clock a dark looking object was descried coming around Craney Island, through Norfolk channel, and proceeding straight in our direction. It was instantly recognized as the Merrimac. We had been on the lookout for her for sometime, and were as well prepared then as we could have been at any other time, or as we
Craney Island (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
Newport News, about 800 yards from the shore, the Congress being 200 yards south of us. The morning was mild and pleasant, and the day opened without any note worthy incident. About 11 o'clock a dark looking object was descried coming around Craney Island, through Norfolk channel, and proceeding straight in our direction. It was instantly recognized as the Merrimac. We had been on the lookout for her for sometime, and were as well prepared then as we could have been at any other time, or as heavy fire might be concentrated on her from different points, and she be thus injured; or possibly she might be grappled to and towed ashore. These and other reasons may suffice to show why the Monitor did not follow among the batteries of Craney Island and Norfolk. Gen. Wool, I understand, has ordered all the women and children away from Fortress Monroe, in anticipation of the Merrimac's reappearance.--During all Sunday morning, while the battle was raging between the two iron-clad vessels
ac is calculated to carry much coal, and that might have been a reason for her retiring from the contest. The Monitor perhaps might follow up the rebel steamers and disable them, but if she gets among the rebel batteries, a heavy fire might be concentrated on her from different points, and she be thus injured; or possibly she might be grappled to and towed ashore. These and other reasons may suffice to show why the Monitor did not follow among the batteries of Craney Island and Norfolk. Gen. Wool, I understand, has ordered all the women and children away from Fortress Monroe, in anticipation of the Merrimac's reappearance.--During all Sunday morning, while the battle was raging between the two iron-clad vessels, the high cliffs of Newport News and vicinity were crowded with spectators, earnestly watching the progress of the fight. War Gazette. Executive Mansion, Washington, January 27th, 1862. President's General War Order, No. 1. Ordered, that the 22d day of Febr
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