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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 31, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
be too grateful. It is possible that many of us may have to choose between abject submission and death, or exile. Thousands have already given up their homes rather than remain even under the temporary despotism of a tyrant. Wendell Phillips, and the persecuting mob whom he represents, may see from these examples that there are no sacrifices which brave men will not make rather than become slaves. The Southern Confederacy and its armies embrace tens of thousands of noble citizens of Maryland, Northwestern Virginia, and Kentucky, who have left the dear homes of their childhood, and have determined never to look upon them again except as freemen. Exile has no terrors compared with the intolerable degradation of being subjugated by Yankees. It is hard to give up one's native land; but, in our own country, men often voluntarily relinquish it for the more purposes of enterprise and money making. Much more readily will they leave the South when it ceases to be the South, and with
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
It is possible that many of us may have to choose between abject submission and death, or exile. Thousands have already given up their homes rather than remain even under the temporary despotism of a tyrant. Wendell Phillips, and the persecuting mob whom he represents, may see from these examples that there are no sacrifices which brave men will not make rather than become slaves. The Southern Confederacy and its armies embrace tens of thousands of noble citizens of Maryland, Northwestern Virginia, and Kentucky, who have left the dear homes of their childhood, and have determined never to look upon them again except as freemen. Exile has no terrors compared with the intolerable degradation of being subjugated by Yankees. It is hard to give up one's native land; but, in our own country, men often voluntarily relinquish it for the more purposes of enterprise and money making. Much more readily will they leave the South when it ceases to be the South, and with a more generous
Wendell Phillips (search for this): article 1
Wendell Phillip's late Speech. Wendell Phillips, in his late ferocious Speech, threatening fifty thousand of the sons of the South with "exile or death," seems to purpose that these are the greatest evils which could be visited upon man. To such a creature as be is death is no doubt the greatest of sorrow for it introduces har to him a frightful calamity. Doubtless, if Massachuset were overrun by a race as repugnant in all respects to her people as are the Yankees to the South, Wendell Phillips would prefer to remain in it, and kiss the feet of the conqueror, court their favor and tremble at their frowns, rather than breathe the free air in a foreigtween abject submission and death, or exile. Thousands have already given up their homes rather than remain even under the temporary despotism of a tyrant. Wendell Phillips, and the persecuting mob whom he represents, may see from these examples that there are no sacrifices which brave men will not make rather than become slaves
eople as are the Yankees to the South, Wendell Phillips would prefer to remain in it, and kiss the feet of the conqueror, court their favor and tremble at their frowns, rather than breathe the free air in a foreign land. But men is not the spirit of the South. We have heard our brave women say, with tears in their eyes that they would rather die than behold the subjugation of their native land. And where such is the spirit of the women, the men cannot be expected to be actuated by purposes Lars lofty and resolves less inflexible. And as to "exile," is the event of Yankee conquest, what would it be, but freedom "from daily contact with the things we loathe?" We do not underrate the love of our native land; but dear to its people as is every foot of its entered rail every noble mountain and beautiful river, bellowed as it is by grand historic and honest old traditions, made precious by all the memories of youth, friendship, love, and hope, and made dearer even by the burning trib
Wendell Phillip (search for this): article 1
Wendell Phillip's late Speech. Wendell Phillips, in his late ferocious Speech, threatening fifty thousand of the sons of the South with "exile or death," seems to purpose that these are the greatest evils which could be visited upon man. To such a creature as be is death is no doubt the greatest of sorrow for it introduces him to the punishment which such miscreants do not always receive in this life. Even exiles from a conquered land may appear to him a frightful calamity. Doubtless, if Massachuset were overrun by a race as repugnant in all respects to her people as are the Yankees to the South, Wendell Phillips would prefer to remain in it, and kiss the feet of the conqueror, court their favor and tremble at their frowns, rather than breathe the free air in a foreign land. But men is not the spirit of the South. We have heard our brave women say, with tears in their eyes that they would rather die than behold the subjugation of their native land. And where such is the spi