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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 8, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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For Hire --An excellent Cook and Chambermaid Both of them are young and without encumbrance. Apply to P. M. Tabe, Under the Exchange Hotel. ap 7--2t*
P. M. Tabe (search for this): article 1
For Hire --An excellent Cook and Chambermaid Both of them are young and without encumbrance. Apply to P. M. Tabe, Under the Exchange Hotel. ap 7--2t*
April 4th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
Ass't Q'rmaster's Office,Eaco's Quarter Branch,April 4, 1862. Persons Hiping Slaves to this department will call on the first of each month and collect their hire. W. S. Wood, Capt. and A. Q'rmaster. ap 5--tap15
Ass't Q'rmaster's Office,Eaco's Quarter Branch,April 4, 1862. Persons Hiping Slaves to this department will call on the first of each month and collect their hire. W. S. Wood, Capt. and A. Q'rmaster. ap 5--tap15
W. S. Wood (search for this): article 1
Ass't Q'rmaster's Office,Eaco's Quarter Branch,April 4, 1862. Persons Hiping Slaves to this department will call on the first of each month and collect their hire. W. S. Wood, Capt. and A. Q'rmaster. ap 5--tap15
uraged by a dashing capture of the rebel batteries, or a determined contest until they were silenced, and a passage forced through to the army of Gen Pope. Gen. Bragg, who is in command, has great confidence in his engineering skill, and will, no doubt, do all that any of their Generals could do under the circumstances. The eral Pope has no other method than to transport his stores, ammunition, and reinforcements from Bird's Point or Commerce over wretched over flowed swamps. General Bragg, similarly, has a hostile force intervening between his army and its reserve, and the transports and gunboats hemmed in by a blockade of which we can only pray that it may be equal to all that will be required of it. Bragg has, however, a way of escape left by marching his army over the neck of land to Meriwether's Landing, where some of his gunboats and transports are awaiting. It will be impossible for Gen. Pope to push his light siege guns any farther down the west bank of the river
March 26th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
The fight at Island no.10.a Federal account.situation of the Opposing forces. [from N. Y. World's Special Correspondent.] Gunboat Onestuga, Mississippi Island No.10th, March 26, 1862 The bombardment drags. For some raze not easily explained or understood, we are now lying at anchor waiting for the consummation of other movements, without clag anything to hasten the results of the expedition further than to send an occasional shell over to the vicinity of the rebel earthworks, without to ascertain whether they accomplish much or little. For the past four days we have fired probably fifty mortar shells a day, receiving sometimes one, two, and on one day no return shot. The known results of our fire thus far are simply to and destroy the upper battery on the Kentucky shore. Not a response of any kind has been heard from that work for four days. All that can be scanned by the most powerful is the bare earthworks, with two black looking objects rising above them, wh
few miles below Hiceman, by cavalry reconnoitering force sent out by Col. Buford, has resulted in the important intelligence that the enemy at Island No.10 is still keeping up a reinforcement by means of the line of railroad between Hiceman and Humboldt. They appear to have a force still stationed at Humboldt, and are keeping open the road thereof The distance from Corinth to Columbus is 144 miles, and from Corinth to Humboldt to At or Tennessee, they are within 25 miles of island No.10, aHumboldt to At or Tennessee, they are within 25 miles of island No.10, and it is across this route that reinforcements have been sent to be prisoners report that 1,500 crossed from the railroad to the island on Wednesday, and that larger quantities were expected to follow. This would indeed seem as if, flashed with their comparative success, they had determined upon crowding their available resources into this fortification. It will be noticed also that unless this route be stopped, it will also avail the enemy for a retreat. What steps have been taken to cut
held by the masses of the rebel army should have been encouraged by a dashing capture of the rebel batteries, or a determined contest until they were silenced, and a passage forced through to the army of Gen Pope. Gen. Bragg, who is in command, has great confidence in his engineering skill, and will, no doubt, do all that any of their Generals could do under the circumstances. The whole lower Mississippi is looking to him with hope that he will retrieve the misfortunes of Tilghman and Buckner. A dead lock. Things at the present moment seem to be in a sort of dead lock, neither party being able to make any very successful diversion or attack. Very singularly, both armies are out off from their supplies by river, but both have about equal facilities of communication by land. General Pope has no other method than to transport his stores, ammunition, and reinforcements from Bird's Point or Commerce over wretched over flowed swamps. General Bragg, similarly, has a hos
ch was blown up in attempting to run the blockade from below, as if the explosion had been from our magazine it would have been followed by shots from the boat--Commodore Foots has learned nothing of the result as yet, for, though we are only twelve miles apart, it seems to require twice that number of hours to get a communication through. Capture of prisoners--Rebels being reinforced The capture of prisoners a few miles below Hiceman, by cavalry reconnoitering force sent out by Col. Buford, has resulted in the important intelligence that the enemy at Island No.10 is still keeping up a reinforcement by means of the line of railroad between Hiceman and Humboldt. They appear to have a force still stationed at Humboldt, and are keeping open the road thereof The distance from Corinth to Columbus is 144 miles, and from Corinth to Humboldt to At or Tennessee, they are within 25 miles of island No.10, and it is across this route that reinforcements have been sent to be prisone
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