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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 11, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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gade about positions, feeling confident that each and all endeavored to do their duty, and that Gen. Jackson, in his report, will give all a fair share of the glory. J. Loss of the Rockbridge Artillery in the engagement. Camp of the Rockbridge Artillery, First Brigade, A. V., Shenandoah co., Va., April 5, 1862. Editors Dispatch: Below I send a list of the casualties occurring in the Rockbridge Artillery, Captain William McLaughlin, in the battle near Winchester on the 23d ult. This company is a large one, and containing, as it does, many members from the State at large, the accompanying list will be examined with even more than usual interest. It may be regarded as accurate, having been furnished me by the commanding officer of the battery: Killed — none. Wounded--Sergeant James L. Paxton, of Rockbridge, severely in the leg, (amputated;) Privates Samuel D. Anderson of Rockbridge; severely in the arm, (broken;) William H. Byrd, of Rockbridge, dangerousl
is company is a large one, and containing, as it does, many members from the State at large, the accompanying list will be examined with even more than usual interest. It may be regarded as accurate, having been furnished me by the commanding officer of the battery: Killed — none. Wounded--Sergeant James L. Paxton, of Rockbridge, severely in the leg, (amputated;) Privates Samuel D. Anderson of Rockbridge; severely in the arm, (broken;) William H. Byrd, of Rockbridge, dangerously, (leg shot off;) Michael J. Emmett, of Rockbridge, very slightly in the face; of Orange, very slightly in the face; Thomas P. Gray, of Rockbridge, dangerously in the foot, (since dead;) J. Campbell Heiskell, of Hardy, slightly in the arm; Kinlock Nelson, of Nelson, very slightly in the foot; George W. Reintzel, of Rockbridge, severely in arm and hip; John A. Wallace, of Rockbridge, mortally in the thigh. Missing — Robert S. Bell, of Winchester, (taken prisoner.) Artilleryman. Total--11.
Stonewall (search for this): article 1
cting Lieutenant in company F, was wounded in the fight, but, nothing daunted, boldly led his men safely off the field. The statement in your issue of the 31st, that the 27th Virginia had a race with the enemy for a stone fence, was a mistake. The 23d and 37th engaged the enemy at that point, and, reaching the fence about 50 yards in advance, poured into their ranks a most destructive fire and put the few not left upon the field to flight. We have no disposition to quarrel with the "Stonewall" Brigade about positions, feeling confident that each and all endeavored to do their duty, and that Gen. Jackson, in his report, will give all a fair share of the glory. J. Loss of the Rockbridge Artillery in the engagement. Camp of the Rockbridge Artillery, First Brigade, A. V., Shenandoah co., Va., April 5, 1862. Editors Dispatch: Below I send a list of the casualties occurring in the Rockbridge Artillery, Captain William McLaughlin, in the battle near Winchester o
March 23rd (search for this): article 1
s, we think it nothing amiss to give another description of our famous struggle at Kernstown. We will, therefore, mention briefly a few incidents of this remarkable occurrence, and leave the seat to the experienced historian. On the morning of the 23d of March, we were ordered from camp at a very early hour. After traveling a distance of 18 miles, and about midday, we heard a loud and repeated cannonading in our front. A closer approach assured us that it was our pickets contending withtion at their next arrival. Mills. Twenty-Third Virginia Regiment. Newmarket, Shenandoah, Va., April 3, 1862. Having seen in your issue of the 1st a statement that a list of those killed, wounded, and missing in the battle of the 23d of March had not been furnished for publication, I send you below a list of those from our regiment, (23d Va:) Capt. J. E. Parkinson's company (B)--Wounded — J. E. Foster. Missing — Geo. L. Sanderson, Thomas B. Hall, W. A. Dearing. Capt. A
April 3rd, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
emy's loss in the engagement, but from several reports that have reached us from quite reliable sources, it does not amount to less than 1,500 killed, wounded, and missing, while ours does not exceed 500. The enemy are still advancing up the Valley. Gen. Jackson has fallen back within two miles of Newmarket, where he seems to be making every preparation to give them another warm reception at their next arrival. Mills. Twenty-Third Virginia Regiment. Newmarket, Shenandoah, Va., April 3, 1862. Having seen in your issue of the 1st a statement that a list of those killed, wounded, and missing in the battle of the 23d of March had not been furnished for publication, I send you below a list of those from our regiment, (23d Va:) Capt. J. E. Parkinson's company (B)--Wounded — J. E. Foster. Missing — Geo. L. Sanderson, Thomas B. Hall, W. A. Dearing. Capt. A. V. Scott's company, (C)--Wounded — Wm. T. Edmonds. Capt. W. J. Sergeant's company, (D)--Missing--Capt. W.<
April 5th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
The battle of Kernstown. The following communications, received at the office of the Dispatch, will be perused with interest: Incidents of the fight. Newmarket, Va., April 5, 1862. Several accounts of this memorable day have already been given, but as the lapse of time is required to acquaint the reader with the full and true account of all battles, we think it nothing amiss to give another description of our famous struggle at Kernstown. We will, therefore, mention briefly a do their duty, and that Gen. Jackson, in his report, will give all a fair share of the glory. J. Loss of the Rockbridge Artillery in the engagement. Camp of the Rockbridge Artillery, First Brigade, A. V., Shenandoah co., Va., April 5, 1862. Editors Dispatch: Below I send a list of the casualties occurring in the Rockbridge Artillery, Captain William McLaughlin, in the battle near Winchester on the 23d ult. This company is a large one, and containing, as it does, many memb
dead alone. We have not as yet been able to get an accurate account of the enemy's loss in the engagement, but from several reports that have reached us from quite reliable sources, it does not amount to less than 1,500 killed, wounded, and missing, while ours does not exceed 500. The enemy are still advancing up the Valley. Gen. Jackson has fallen back within two miles of Newmarket, where he seems to be making every preparation to give them another warm reception at their next arrival. Mills. Twenty-Third Virginia Regiment. Newmarket, Shenandoah, Va., April 3, 1862. Having seen in your issue of the 1st a statement that a list of those killed, wounded, and missing in the battle of the 23d of March had not been furnished for publication, I send you below a list of those from our regiment, (23d Va:) Capt. J. E. Parkinson's company (B)--Wounded — J. E. Foster. Missing — Geo. L. Sanderson, Thomas B. Hall, W. A. Dearing. Capt. A. V. Scott's company, (C)--Wound
William McLaughlin (search for this): article 1
have no disposition to quarrel with the "Stonewall" Brigade about positions, feeling confident that each and all endeavored to do their duty, and that Gen. Jackson, in his report, will give all a fair share of the glory. J. Loss of the Rockbridge Artillery in the engagement. Camp of the Rockbridge Artillery, First Brigade, A. V., Shenandoah co., Va., April 5, 1862. Editors Dispatch: Below I send a list of the casualties occurring in the Rockbridge Artillery, Captain William McLaughlin, in the battle near Winchester on the 23d ult. This company is a large one, and containing, as it does, many members from the State at large, the accompanying list will be examined with even more than usual interest. It may be regarded as accurate, having been furnished me by the commanding officer of the battery: Killed — none. Wounded--Sergeant James L. Paxton, of Rockbridge, severely in the leg, (amputated;) Privates Samuel D. Anderson of Rockbridge; severely in the a
company (B)--Wounded — J. E. Foster. Missing — Geo. L. Sanderson, Thomas B. Hall, W. A. Dearing. Capt. A. V. Scott's company, (C)--Wounded — Wm. T. Edmonds. Capt. W. J. Sergeant's company, (D)--Missing--Capt. W. J. Sergeant, Private Richard S. Watkins. Capt Wm. Haymes's company, (E)--Wounded — Jas. E. Barnes, Wm. Davis, Thomas M. Hobson. Captain W. F. Harrison's company, (F)--Wounded — Edward S. Clark. Missing — Jas. S. Johnston, Wilson Bowler, Henry C. Young. Capt. Coleman's company, (G)--Killed — Henry L. Francisco. Wounded — Wm. A. Garrett, Martin Sharp, John P. Waddy. Missing — John L. Burruss, Henry Duke, Henry Oliver, Richard F. Talley, David A. Trice. Cpt. R. A. Tompkins's company (H.)--Wounded--Lieut. E. C. Crump. Missing — Simon Haup. Cpt J. P. Fitzgerald's company, (I.)--Missing--1st Sg't N. E. Venable, privates Frank Hambleton, Jas. M. Hambleton. Capt. S. T. Walton's company, (K.)--Killed — John O. Pettus, P. G. E
than did our little band in this battle of Kernstown. For six long hours they contended with at least five times their own numbers; yet, till the order was announced from the lips of our gallant General Jackson himself, did they dare to leave the field, or despair of victory. Whilst every regiment doubtless acted its part well in this engagement, yet we could not but take particular cognizance of the acts of bravery that marked and distinguished those of the Third Brigade, commanded by Colonel Burks. Never before having had an opportunity of displaying their valor, they seemed anxious for the hour when they, too, might share a blow in their country's cause. For seven long months they traversed the mountains of Northwestern Virginia, subsisted upon scanty supplies, and performed many hard and toilsome marches. Thus hardened to their country's service, they cared but little for the life they once held so dear, and seemed even enraged at the cannon's roar. Led on by their dauntless
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