hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Beauregard 30 6 Browse Search
Gen Buell 26 0 Browse Search
Alex Grant 22 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
S. J. Davis 15 1 Browse Search
Jacksonville (Florida, United States) 15 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 14 0 Browse Search
W. Price 12 0 Browse Search
Gen McClellan 12 0 Browse Search
September, 4 AD 10 10 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 18, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 133 total hits in 55 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): article 1
t the thanks of the Department are also given to Generals Our and Siegel, and the officers and soldiers of their commands, for the matchless gallantry at the bloody battle of Pea Ridge, and to Major-Generals Grant and Buell, and their forces, for the glorious repulse of Beauregard, at Pittsburg, in Tennessee, and to Major-General Pope and his officers and soldiers for the bravery and skill displayed in their operations against the rebels and traitors entrenched at Island No.10, on the Mississippi river. The daring courage, diligent prosecution, persistent valor, and military result of these achievements are unsurpassed. Fourth. That there shall this day be a to of one hundred guns from the United States Arsenal at Washington, in honor of the so great victories. (Signed,) Edwin M. Syanton, Secretary of War. Effects of the news. New York, April 9, 1862. --The city can scarce by comprehend, as yet the last and great set of all our great victories, at Pittsburg La
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
you. [Signed]Gidson Welles. Secretary of the Navy. The Canal across the Peninsula. St. Louis, April 9. --General Pope's official report says: "The canal cut across the peninsula at New Madrid, through which the steamers and several barges were taken, is twelve miles long, through heavy timber, which had to be sawed off by hand four feet under water. The idea of this laborious under taking originated with Gen. Schuyler Hamilton, and the work performed by Col. Bissall's Missouri engineering regiment. Remarkable War Bulletin — the way the Yankee Masses are Humbugged. War Department, Washington, April 9th, 1862. First. That at the meridian of Sunday next, sitter the receipt of this order, at the head of every regiment in the armies of the United States, there shall be offered by its Chaplain, a prayer giving thanks to the Lord of Hosts for the recent manifestation of His power in the overthrow of the rebels and traitors, and invoking the continuanc
Davison (South Dakota, United States) (search for this): article 1
cy toward returned Secessionists, are also continually petitioning to have additional troops sent to their counties to protect them from the operations of these same rebels. Very respectfully, your ob't servant. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. Waly Andy Johnson 18 doing. Governor Johnson has superseded the Mayor, Alderman, and Councilmen of Nashville, who refused to take the oath of allegiance, by filling their places with royal man. Washington Barrow, State Senator from Davison county, who was arrested on Tuesday afternoon, was one of the Commissioners for the sale and transfer of Tennessee to the Southern. Confederacy. He is a man of wealth, and one of the most prominent politicians in the State. He has been a member of Congress from the Hermitage district, and was Minister to Portugal during the Administration of Harrison. John Overton, who, at the outset of the rebellion, tendered his entire property — thened tifiated at five millions--to Governor Harris, to
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
m the North. Affairs on the Peninsula — Washington dispatches--Gen. Halleck's policy — the Military Dictator in Tennessee, &c., &c. From late Yankee papers in our postoral on we make up the following summary: The Peninsula. Baltir from Davison county, who was arrested on Tuesday afternoon, was one of the Commissioners for the sale and transfer of Tennessee to the Southern. Confederacy. He is a man of wealth, and one of the most prominent politicians in the State. He has be rebellion, tendered his entire property — thened tifiated at five millions--to Governor Harris, to aid in dissevering Tennessee from the National Confederacy is arrested. When the draft took place, hedssised upon all suspected of Union sentiments hospitality, and was the person who entertained Charle. Sumue, some years ago. At the, incipiency of the rebellion in Tennessee he offered all his estate and his services to Governor Harris. He was a member of the Military Board, and untiring in <
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): article 1
d the Mayor, Alderman, and Councilmen of Nashville, who refused to take the oath of allegiance, by filling their places with royal man. Washington Barrow, State Senator from Davison county, who was arrested on Tuesday afternoon, was one of the Commissioners for the sale and transfer of Tennessee to the Southern. Confederacy. He is a man of wealth, and one of the most prominent politicians in the State. He has been a member of Congress from the Hermitage district, and was Minister to Portugal during the Administration of Harrison. John Overton, who, at the outset of the rebellion, tendered his entire property — thened tifiated at five millions--to Governor Harris, to aid in dissevering Tennessee from the National Confederacy is arrested. When the draft took place, hedssised upon all suspected of Union sentiments. He has a son in the rebel army. An ancodo's is told of him. Upon a regimental muster of the military he harangued his soldiers and urged them to leave their hom
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
Generals Our and Siegel, and the officers and soldiers of their commands, for the matchless gallantry at the bloody battle of Pea Ridge, and to Major-Generals Grant and Buell, and their forces, for the glorious repulse of Beauregard, at Pittsburg, in Tennessee, and to Major-General Pope and his officers and soldiers for the bravery and skill displayed in their operations against the rebels and traitors entrenched at Island No.10, on the Mississippi river. The daring courage, diligent prosecutn honor of the so great victories. (Signed,) Edwin M. Syanton, Secretary of War. Effects of the news. New York, April 9, 1862. --The city can scarce by comprehend, as yet the last and great set of all our great victories, at Pittsburg Landing — but the news is received, I think, with a deeper feeling of thankfulness to heaven and of gratitude to the gallant men who achieved it, than any which the events is of the war have yet called form. There is no blusterous rejoicing-no po
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
orable character with a view to a fleet prices, and in this they were partially successful. One of these rumors was that the rallied at Corinth, and, with large reinforcements, were again advancing upon Gen. Buell. Of course, there was not the slightest authority for these, stories, but the over credulous, in many cases, them down. The Merrimac, for the hundredth time, also, was reported as having come down, destroyed the Vanderbilt, shelled our camps at Newport News, pitched into Fortress Monroe, and what else I dare not say will the day of dupes never pass away? Baltimore, April 9, 1862.--The glorious news of overwhelming triumphs to the Union cause and to the United States Government, which have come upon us since yesterday morning, fills every loyal heart here with rejoining. It looked indeed as if the day of peace was dawning and not far, distant. The great principle for which our revolutionary fathers fought is likely to be speedily redeemed and rescued from the blo
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
s generally were postponed till due consideration was given to the various assertions of the telegraph. Flags were raised, the news was announced amid cheers in the various schools and workshops, of the city, exclamations were exchanged in the streets, and men hurried early to dinner at their homes, to unburden to families and wives the pent-up elation of their souls. Beauregard and Johnston, the great military athletes of the rebellion, had been met and crushed, and all felt that two mighty pillars of that great tower of crime had been struck from its support. The heavy stated loss of eighteen to twenty thousand men was doubted by all, and, thank fortune, there was reason to suppose that few or no Pennsylvania troops were engaged in the fearful strife. Mothers and wives of our city were thus for once spared the agony of suspense for the safety of bright young hearts and noble souls, and all were enabled to discuss with equanimity the absorbing topic of the hour.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
rson. Headq'rs Det't of the Mississippi, St. Louis, Mo., April 3, 1861. Wm. M. McPherson, Esq., St. Louis: Sir — Your letter of this date is received. In answer to your inquiries, I have to state that persons in arms against the United States, under General Price, can be received only as prisoners of war, and that they will be treated in the same kind and lenient manner as others have been who are willing to abandon a hopeless and unholy cause, take the prescribed oath of allegianWar Bulletin — the way the Yankee Masses are Humbugged. War Department, Washington, April 9th, 1862. First. That at the meridian of Sunday next, sitter the receipt of this order, at the head of every regiment in the armies of the United States, there shall be offered by its Chaplain, a prayer giving thanks to the Lord of Hosts for the recent manifestation of His power in the overthrow of the rebels and traitors, and invoking the continuance of His aid in delivering this nation, by
Davidson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
ntiments. He has a son in the rebel army. An ancodo's is told of him. Upon a regimental muster of the military he harangued his soldiers and urged them to leave their homes and friends and fight for their country. At the close of his remark an enthusiast shouted. "Lead on, Colonel; we'll follow you!." This display of zeal, coupled with the desire to see him participation plused him, and he backed out." Another important arrest is that of Williams Giles Harding, an old citizen of Davidson county, who owns the most beautiful residence and plantation in the State, about six miles from Nashville. His park covers an area of a hundred acres, in which are hoards of deer, buffalo, goats, &c., also a large numbers of noisiest cattle, sheep, &c. He is noted for his hospitality, and was the person who entertained Charle. Sumue, some years ago. At the, incipiency of the rebellion in Tennessee he offered all his estate and his services to Governor Harris. He was a member of the Militar
1 2 3 4 5 6