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Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
Confederate army. The troops, commanded, as it is supposed, by President Davis in person, are the most numerous and the best armed that the Confederates possess. They fight in a country which its thoroughly hostile to the North. Virginia, though geographically a border State, is politically and socially one of the most extreme in the Confederacy. No State has lost so much from the growing populousness of the North. Although three age Spenser dedicated his poem to the Queen of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Virginia, yet the old State now finds herself of less importance than Illinois and California. The Virginias will, no doubt, second all the efforts of the military chiefs, and the policy of these is already manifest. The main army of the Confederates had evacuated Manassas before the 12th of March.--How long they had been gone, no one seems to know One of the strangest features of this war is the success of the Confederates in preventing the enemy from gaining any knowledge o
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
Interesting from Europe. British opinion of the naval battle in Hampton Roads — the revolution in Marine warfare commenced. Our extracts from English papers include dates as late as March 26th, We copy the comments of the Times on our naval victory in Hampton Roads. [from the London Times, March 25,] The campaign in Virginia has at last begun. A naval battle and a general advance of the Federal army on the Potomac are the events which we record to-day. The first of thHampton Roads. [from the London Times, March 25,] The campaign in Virginia has at last begun. A naval battle and a general advance of the Federal army on the Potomac are the events which we record to-day. The first of these is one of the most interesting incidents that have marked the war. For the first time, the newest applications of science have been tested in a fight between foes of equal courage. Who would have thought it possible that after England and France had theorized so long on iron-plated and iron-prowed vessels, the first real trial should be made by the inhabitants of the peaceful New World met in unnatural strife, and, furthermore, that victory should rest with the party less versed in naval-t
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
e, and, furthermore, that victory should rest with the party less versed in naval-tactics-and-construction? Though for a long time there has been mention of the Merrimac in the Southern papers, we were not prepared for the achievements in the James river. The Confederate frigate seems to have gained an easy victory over her wooden opponents. The accounts of the action are rather vague, but it appears that she disabled the Cumberland and the Congress in a very showtime, fulfilling in the m, and the gallant manner in which she was handled in action is a token that the Confederate courage it still as high as ever. But it is not by sea fights that the fortunes of the new republic are to be determined. The brilliant affair of the James river will, no doubt, do much to reanimates the Southerners after their successive defeats, but in itself it is of little importance. Scientific Deductions from the result of the battle — the Reconstruction of the English Navy a work of necessi
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
and most reluctant to adopt it; but when the time for action arrived, necessity made itself felt, and they have now given the theory all the practical confirmation it needed. There is one other conclusion too, which we may craw from the operations of the American belligerents. The alleged efficiency of gunboats against heavier vessels has been disproved. The Confederates appear to have built upon this theory at first, but their "mosquitoes motiles" have never succeeded.--Neither at Port Royal nor Roanoke did their swarm of gunboats produce the least effect against the large ships of the Federal. Vessels, of this class operating upon rivers in conjunction with land forces have proved of the greatest service; indeed, the Northerners owe most of their successor to them but in narrow seas, and against heavy frigates or sloops, the small craft have been round as useless as a fleet of . No gunboats, as far as we can judge, will do the work of our Warriors, nor will any frigate, howe
California (California, United States) (search for this): article 2
erous and the best armed that the Confederates possess. They fight in a country which its thoroughly hostile to the North. Virginia, though geographically a border State, is politically and socially one of the most extreme in the Confederacy. No State has lost so much from the growing populousness of the North. Although three age Spenser dedicated his poem to the Queen of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Virginia, yet the old State now finds herself of less importance than Illinois and California. The Virginias will, no doubt, second all the efforts of the military chiefs, and the policy of these is already manifest. The main army of the Confederates had evacuated Manassas before the 12th of March.--How long they had been gone, no one seems to know One of the strangest features of this war is the success of the Confederates in preventing the enemy from gaining any knowledge of their plans. Though it is constantly asserted that a large Union party exists at the South; though there
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 2
om the Potomac.[from the London, Times, March 25th.] All thoughts must now be directed to the combined invasion of the Southern States, which was to begin in the present month of March. This extraordinary enterprise deserves the study both of political and military students. In its magnitude, in the nature of the armies which are to operate, in the nature of the country, and of the populations whose territory is invaded the great Federal invasion stands alone in modern history. It is Napoleon's war in Spain on the scale of his expedition to Russia. Immense forces are assembled to subjugate a people who, unless they are the empties of boasters, are determined to burn homes ends and goods, to destroy the produce of their fields, to carry off their families, their negroes, their cattle, and all that they have and to leave every place a desert from which the invader forces them to retire. The real beginning of the campaign may now be witnessed. From Tennessee we have but meag
France (France) (search for this): article 2
n our naval victory in Hampton Roads. [from the London Times, March 25,] The campaign in Virginia has at last begun. A naval battle and a general advance of the Federal army on the Potomac are the events which we record to-day. The first of these is one of the most interesting incidents that have marked the war. For the first time, the newest applications of science have been tested in a fight between foes of equal courage. Who would have thought it possible that after England and France had theorized so long on iron-plated and iron-prowed vessels, the first real trial should be made by the inhabitants of the peaceful New World met in unnatural strife, and, furthermore, that victory should rest with the party less versed in naval-tactics-and-construction? Though for a long time there has been mention of the Merrimac in the Southern papers, we were not prepared for the achievements in the James river. The Confederate frigate seems to have gained an easy victory over her
Big Lick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
ctant to adopt it; but when the time for action arrived, necessity made itself felt, and they have now given the theory all the practical confirmation it needed. There is one other conclusion too, which we may craw from the operations of the American belligerents. The alleged efficiency of gunboats against heavier vessels has been disproved. The Confederates appear to have built upon this theory at first, but their "mosquitoes motiles" have never succeeded.--Neither at Port Royal nor Roanoke did their swarm of gunboats produce the least effect against the large ships of the Federal. Vessels, of this class operating upon rivers in conjunction with land forces have proved of the greatest service; indeed, the Northerners owe most of their successor to them but in narrow seas, and against heavy frigates or sloops, the small craft have been round as useless as a fleet of . No gunboats, as far as we can judge, will do the work of our Warriors, nor will any frigate, however well arme
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 2
der forces them to retire. The real beginning of the campaign may now be witnessed. From Tennessee we have but meagre accounts. In this region the Confederates have been thoroughly beaten. Tht, Buell and the rest of the Western Generals. The consequence has been the occupation of Central Tennessee by a Federal army, and the retreat of the Confederates to the Southern limits of the StateGeorgina, but it is beyond a doubt that the Confederates will do all in their power to recover Tennessee. The loss of a State is especially dangerous to the Southerners, inasmuch as their Confederac founded on the principle of State independence, and they have too much reason to fear that if Tennessee were irrevocably annexed to the North all the Tennesseeans would leave their army, on the grouwill be shown by the event. Their movements have no doubt, been decided by the late events in Tennessee; and, if any, considerable part of the Potomac army has been sent West there is all the more r
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 2
e the most numerous and the best armed that the Confederates possess. They fight in a country which its thoroughly hostile to the North. Virginia, though geographically a border State, is politically and socially one of the most extreme in the Confederacy. No State has lost so much from the growing populousness of the North. Although three age Spenser dedicated his poem to the Queen of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Virginia, yet the old State now finds herself of less importance than Illinois and California. The Virginias will, no doubt, second all the efforts of the military chiefs, and the policy of these is already manifest. The main army of the Confederates had evacuated Manassas before the 12th of March.--How long they had been gone, no one seems to know One of the strangest features of this war is the success of the Confederates in preventing the enemy from gaining any knowledge of their plans. Though it is constantly asserted that a large Union party exists at the South
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