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Jacksonport (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 24
ce of two thousand cavalry was said to have taken the road North, towards Huntsville. It is impossible to learn the destination of these troops, but it is most probable that they were bound for some point on the Mississippi river, near Jacksonport, Ark. It is also reported that the rebels at Pocahontas have orders, on the appearance of a Union force, to retreat to Jacksonport. Gen. Price and the Missouri State Guard were left at Van-Buren. Col. Wood, who is in command of the U. Jacksonport. Gen. Price and the Missouri State Guard were left at Van-Buren. Col. Wood, who is in command of the U. States forces in Houston, is kept busy watching the enemy, and keeps them lack in Arkansas. A week ago two of the rebel leaders, Coleman and McFarland, quarrelled and separated, not agreeing on a policy, but it is now ascertained that General McBride has succeeded them in the command of all their forces. He has been reinforced by 6,000 men from Pocahontas, and intends a raid from Houston to Rolla, but he will find the Union troops ready to receive him. We have almost daily communication w
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 24
rious in time to reinforce the former position. The War in Arkansas. St. Louis, April 14. --The correspondent of the Missouri Democrat, writing from Houston, Mo. under date of April 9th, says: "The whole Confederate force in the late Pea Ridge battle have gone east down the Arkansas river. A little over a week ago they passed through Clarksville, sixty miles east of Van-Buren. At that point a force of two thousand cavalry was said to have taken the road North, towards Huntsville. It is impossible to learn the destination of these troops, but it is most probable that they were bound for some point on the Mississippi river, near Jacksonport, Ark. It is also reported that the rebels at Pocahontas have orders, on the appearance of a Union force, to retreat to Jacksonport. Gen. Price and the Missouri State Guard were left at Van-Buren. Col. Wood, who is in command of the U. States forces in Houston, is kept busy watching the enemy, and keeps them lack i
Rolla, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 24
and the Missouri State Guard were left at Van-Buren. Col. Wood, who is in command of the U. States forces in Houston, is kept busy watching the enemy, and keeps them lack in Arkansas. A week ago two of the rebel leaders, Coleman and McFarland, quarrelled and separated, not agreeing on a policy, but it is now ascertained that General McBride has succeeded them in the command of all their forces. He has been reinforced by 6,000 men from Pocahontas, and intends a raid from Houston to Rolla, but he will find the Union troops ready to receive him. We have almost daily communication with and information from the rebel camp. Last week they had a grand muster, the people of the whole country turning out, but only three men volunteering. Rebel Captain and a mail taken. Baltimore, April 14. --The United States steamer Hercules, Thomas S. Dungan, Lieutenant Commanding, reached this port this morning, having with her the schooner Bride, previously reported as being captur
Harrisburg (Texas, United States) (search for this): article 24
rious in time to reinforce the former position. The War in Arkansas. St. Louis, April 14. --The correspondent of the Missouri Democrat, writing from Houston, Mo. under date of April 9th, says: "The whole Confederate force in the late Pea Ridge battle have gone east down the Arkansas river. A little over a week on force, to retreat to Jacksonport. Gen. Price and the Missouri State Guard were left at Van-Buren. Col. Wood, who is in command of the U. States forces in Houston, is kept busy watching the enemy, and keeps them lack in Arkansas. A week ago two of the rebel leaders, Coleman and McFarland, quarrelled and separated, not agreined that General McBride has succeeded them in the command of all their forces. He has been reinforced by 6,000 men from Pocahontas, and intends a raid from Houston to Rolla, but he will find the Union troops ready to receive him. We have almost daily communication with and information from the rebel camp. Last week they had
Pocomoke Sound (United States) (search for this): article 24
reat Annamessix, and the crew, with five passengers from Richmond, one of whom was a captain in the rebel army. On searching the Velma there was found a large mail, containing about two hundred letters, a large number of which were addressed to persons in Baltimore, and a large number to persons in various parts of Maryland. On searching the crew there was also found two thousand dollars in old Virginia bank notes. The Velma had some time previously been cleared from this port for Pocomoke Sound, with a cargo consisting of provisions of various kinds. This cargo, instead of being discharged in Maryland ports, was taken over to Great Wicomico river, and there discharged within the boundaries of Virginia. The sloop was in ballast, and was coming back to get a new cargo. The Rebel captain, previous to being captured, burned his commission in the fire, remnants of which being found in the ashes, he acknowledged the fact, and also that he had been engaged in the battle of Manassas
Monterey, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 24
of the opportunity. If feeling sorry for the late result, their thoughts are admirably disguised. They state that when the Confederate Government decided to make a stand at No. 10, it was thought that Beauregard, at Corinth, would be victorious in time to reinforce the former position. The War in Arkansas. St. Louis, April 14. --The correspondent of the Missouri Democrat, writing from Houston, Mo. under date of April 9th, says: "The whole Confederate force in the late Pea Ridge battle have gone east down the Arkansas river. A little over a week ago they passed through Clarksville, sixty miles east of Van-Buren. At that point a force of two thousand cavalry was said to have taken the road North, towards Huntsville. It is impossible to learn the destination of these troops, but it is most probable that they were bound for some point on the Mississippi river, near Jacksonport, Ark. It is also reported that the rebels at Pocahontas have orders, on the app
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 24
heir thoughts are admirably disguised. They state that when the Confederate Government decided to make a stand at No. 10, it was thought that Beauregard, at Corinth, would be victorious in time to reinforce the former position. The War in Arkansas. St. Louis, April 14. --The correspondent of the Missouri Democrat, writing from Houston, Mo. under date of April 9th, says: "The whole Confederate force in the late Pea Ridge battle have gone east down the Arkansas river. A littlppearance of a Union force, to retreat to Jacksonport. Gen. Price and the Missouri State Guard were left at Van-Buren. Col. Wood, who is in command of the U. States forces in Houston, is kept busy watching the enemy, and keeps them lack in Arkansas. A week ago two of the rebel leaders, Coleman and McFarland, quarrelled and separated, not agreeing on a policy, but it is now ascertained that General McBride has succeeded them in the command of all their forces. He has been reinforced b
Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 24
al statements, it will be interesting to the public to know what they have to say about the progress of the war: Island Number10. A correspondent of the St. Louis Republican, writing from Island No.10, on the 9th, says: The floating baIsland No.10, on the 9th, says: The floating battery, formerly the Pelican dock at New Orleans, drifted down to Madrid, and was secured five miles below there. When first seen, it came sweeping down with the current towards the upper battery, and the garrison, supposing an attempt probable to ruscience with lately.--On the deck a sixty-four lay dismounted, its carriage shivered to pieces by a ball. Passing Island No.10, the most noticeable token of war's ruin is the steamboats sunken and destroyed. On all sides they lay — some capablee flags were captured, one of which bore the inscription: "Equal Justice to each new Partner in the new firm." On Island No.10 there are five batteries and twenty-two guns, but few tents, and no property, except cannon balls, that can be made va
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): article 24
he late result, their thoughts are admirably disguised. They state that when the Confederate Government decided to make a stand at No. 10, it was thought that Beauregard, at Corinth, would be victorious in time to reinforce the former position. The War in Arkansas. St. Louis, April 14. --The correspondent of the Missouri Democrat, writing from Houston, Mo. under date of April 9th, says: "The whole Confederate force in the late Pea Ridge battle have gone east down the Arkansas river. A little over a week ago they passed through Clarksville, sixty miles east of Van-Buren. At that point a force of two thousand cavalry was said to have taken the road North, towards Huntsville. It is impossible to learn the destination of these troops, but it is most probable that they were bound for some point on the Mississippi river, near Jacksonport, Ark. It is also reported that the rebels at Pocahontas have orders, on the appearance of a Union force, to retreat to Jack
Great Wicomico River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 24
mmanding, reached this port this morning, having with her the schooner Bride, previously reported as being captured, and the sloops Wren and Velma, both of Great Wicomico river, Western Shore of Virginia, also captured prizes. The Hercules left this port a short time since, towing down the light ship which had been previouslyhalf an hour the Hercules came up to the vessel, which proved to be the sloop Velma, having on her stern the name of Bridgetown, though she hailed from the Great Wicomico river, Western Virginia.--Possession was taken, with the Captain, Samuel D. Langford, of Great Annamessix, and the crew, with five passengers from Richmond, one t for Pocomoke Sound, with a cargo consisting of provisions of various kinds. This cargo, instead of being discharged in Maryland ports, was taken over to Great Wicomico river, and there discharged within the boundaries of Virginia. The sloop was in ballast, and was coming back to get a new cargo. The Rebel captain, previous to
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