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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
le the rebels fell back. Faster and faster they ran; less and less resistance was made to the advance. At least the front camps on the left were reached, and by half-past 2 at point was cleared. The rebels had been steadily swept back over the ground they had won. with heavy loss, as they fell into confusion. We had retaken all our own guns lost here the day before, and one or two from the rebels were left as trophies to tell in after days how bravely that great victory over treason in Tennessee was won. Advance of Crittenden's division. I have sketched the advance of Nelson — Next to him came Crittenden. He, too, swept forward over his ground to the front some distance before finding the toe. Between 8 and 9 o'clock, however, while keeping Smith's brigade on his left up even with Nelson's flank, and joining Boyle's brigade to McCook on the right, in the grand advance, they came upon the enemy with a battery in position, and, well supported, Smith dashed his brigade forw
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
. By ten o'clock Sherman's right, under Col. Marsh, came up. He started to move across the fields. The storm of musketry and grape was too much for him, and he fell back in good order again he started on the double and gained, the woods. The Louisiana battery was burned, Marsh's position left. It subject to fire in ..front and then fled. The other repel batteries at once did the same and Wallace's division, up in an instant, now that a master move had swept the board, pushed forward. Befooad fallow fields, then a woody little ravine, then cornfields then woods. The left brigade was forward. It crossed the fallow fields, under ordinary fire, then gained the ravine, and was rushing across the cornfields, when the same Louisiana steel rifled guns opened on them. Dashing forward they reached a little ground swell, behind which they dropped like dead men, while skirmishers were sent forward to alliance the troublesome battery. The skirmishers crawled forward till they
Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): article 1
rig-Gen B M Prentiss. Madison MillerColonel18th Movola. J. L. Geddes.Colonel8th Iowa. W. F. LynchColonel58th Ill John C FergusonColonel8th Iowa. Quin MortonLt Col.23d Mo. Isaac RutshowserLt Col.58th Ill. J V PrattLt Col.18th Mc. Jno McCullochmajor23d Mo. Wm Stonemajor3d Iowa. Thes Newlanmajor58th Ill. J G BoltAdjutant58Col.58th Ill. J V PrattLt Col.18th Mc. Jno McCullochmajor23d Mo. Wm Stonemajor3d Iowa. Thes Newlanmajor58th Ill. J G BoltAdjutant58th Ill. Wm. McMichaelCaptainA Gen. J. T. DulapCaptain23d Missouri B T BoltCaptain23d Missouri A TrumboCaptain23d Missouri E WestCaptain23d Missouri W N CrandalCaptain23d Missouri R H BrownCaptain23d Missouri S G HootsCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri P R DolmenCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri Jonss DusmapCaptain(Suri,)18th MissouriCol.18th Mc. Jno McCullochmajor23d Mo. Wm Stonemajor3d Iowa. Thes Newlanmajor58th Ill. J G BoltAdjutant58th Ill. Wm. McMichaelCaptainA Gen. J. T. DulapCaptain23d Missouri B T BoltCaptain23d Missouri A TrumboCaptain23d Missouri E WestCaptain23d Missouri W N CrandalCaptain23d Missouri R H BrownCaptain23d Missouri S G HootsCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri P R DolmenCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri Jonss DusmapCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri G W WyckeffCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri I P MikeswellCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri H P StuitsCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri James P MillercCaptain18th Wiso'n N M SeyneCaptain18th Wiso'n G A FiskCaptain18th Wiso'n Wm BremmerCaptain18th Wiso'n D H SaxtonCaptain18th Wiso'n W B BellCaptain8th Iowa Calvin KelseyCaptain8th Iowa Jo
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
We take from the Memphis Appeal a list of the Federal officers that have arrived in that city, as far as known, though the Appeal states that it is imperfect. I will be seen that Gen. Prentise has actually carried out his threat to dine in Memphis, and we presume that his desire to visit the far South will also be gratified by our very polite and indulgent officers. The list of Colonels is headed by Madison Miller, of St. Louis, for many years a prominent Black Republican politician in Missouri, and one of the confidential friends of Frank Blair. If there is one thing more than another which demonstrates the completeness of our victory, it is the large number of officers captured — We doubt not that the list will be greatly swelled by farther accounts. Federal officers at Memphis. The following list of officers of the Federal army, captured at the battle of Shiloh on Sunday last, has been furnished us by the officer in charge, as handed him by General Prentiss. The latt
Prattsburg (New York, United States) (search for this): article 1
lock, two hours later than on the right, a general rebel retreat — then pursuit, recall and encampment on the old grounds of Sherman's division, in the very tens from which these regiments were driven that hapless Sunday morning. The camps were regained; the rebels were repulsed; their attack had failed; we stood where we began; rebel cavalry were within half a mile of us; the retreating columns were within striking distance. But we had regained our camps. And so ended the battle of Prattsburg. The killed and wounded. I do not pretend to give more than an estimate, but I have made the estimate with some care, going to the Adjutants of diff rent regiments that had been heavy fighting as any, getting statements of their losses — sure to be very near, if not quite, a curate — and approximating thus from the loss of a dozen regiments to the probable loss of all. I have ridden over the ground, too — have seen the dead and wound dying over the field — have noted the numbe
Charles Whittlesey (search for this): article 1
First Brigade--Col. Morgan L. Smith commanding; Eighth Missouri, Lieut Col. Jas. Pecknam commanding; Eleventh Indiana, Col, George F. McGinnis; Twenty-fourth Indiana, Colonel Alvin P. Hovey; Thurber's Missouri battery. Second Brigade--Col. Thayer (First Nebraska) commanding; First Nebraska, Lieut Col McCord commanding; Twenty-third Indiana, Colonel Sanderson; Fifty-eighth Ohio, Col. Braunstein; Sixty-eighth Ohio, Col. Steadman; Thompson's Indiana battery. Third Brigade--Colonel Charles Whittlesey (Twentieth Ohio) commanding; Twentieth Ohio, Lieut. Col.--commanding; Fifty-sixth Ohio, Col. Peter Kinney; seventy-eighth Ohio, Colonel Leggett. Want of system among the Yankees. The reader who is patient enough to wade through this narration will scarcely fail to observe that thus far I have said little or nothing of any plan of attack or defence among our commanders. It has been simply because I have felled to see any evidence of such a plan. To me it seemed on Sunday
William S. Smith (search for this): article 1
ers D. Bruce, Twentieth Kentucky, commanding; First Kentucky, Col. Enyart; Second Kentucky, Col. Sedgwich; Twentieth Kentucky, Lieut Col. -- commanding. Third Brigade--Colonel Hazon, Forty-first Ohio commanding; Forty- first, Sixth Kentucky, and Ninth Indiana. Brigadier General Tom Crittenden's division. First Brigade--Gen Boyle; Nineteenth Ohio, Col. Beatty; Fifty ninth Ohio, Col. Plyff; Thirteenth Kentucky, Col. Robson; Ninth Kentucky, Col. Grider. Second Brigade.--Col. Wm. S. Smith, Thirteenth Ohio, commanding; Thirteenth Ohio, Lieut. Col. Hawkins; Twenty-six Kentucky, Lieut. Col. Maxwell; Eleventh Kentucky, Col. P. P. Hawkins, with Mendenhall's regular and Barlett's Ohio batteries. Brigadier General M'Cook's division. First Brigade--Brig. Gen. Lovell H. Rousseau; First Ohio, Col. Ed A. Parrott; Sixth Indiana, Col. Crittenden; Third Kentucky, (Louisville Legion;) battalions fifteenth, sixteenth and Nineteenth regulars. Second Brigade.--Brig.Gen. Joh
blique the 6th pushes on. The rebel colors fall. Another volley; they fall again. Another volley; yet once more the faded colors drop. There is fatality in it; so the rebels seem to think at least, as they wheel and disappear. And then Rossean's brigade is drawn off, in splendid style, as if coming in from parade, conscious of some grand master of reviews watching their movements. So there was — the rebel General. As he saw the brigade filling back, he pushed his men forward again. Kirk's brigade advanced to meet them, coming out of the woods into an open field to do so. They were by a tremendous fire, which threw a battalion of regular in front of them (under Major Cliver I think.) into some confusion. The retire to reform, and meanwhile down drops the brigade flat on the ground. Then, as the front is clear, they spring up, charge across the open field — never mind the failing — straight on, on to the woods, under cover, with the enemy driven back by the impetuous advanc<
achments that have arrived: Brig-Gen B M Prentiss. Madison MillerColonel18th Movola. J. L. Geddes.Colonel8th Iowa. W. F. LynchColonel58th Ill John C FergusonColonel8th Iowa. Quin MortonLt Col.23d Mo. Isaac RutshowserLt Col.58th Ill. J V PrattLt Col.18th Mc. Jno McCullochmajor23d Mo. Wm Stonemajor3d Iowa. Thes Newlanmajor58th Ill. J G BoltAdjutant58th Ill. Wm. McMichaelCaptainA Gen. J. T. DulapCaptain23d Missouri B T BoltCaptain23d Missouri A TrumboCaptain23d Missouri E WestCaptain23d Missouri W N CrandalCaptain23d Missouri R H BrownCaptain23d Missouri S G HootsCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri P R DolmenCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri Jonss DusmapCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri G W WyckeffCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri I P MikeswellCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri H P StuitsCaptain(Suri,)18th Missouri James P MillercCaptain18th Wiso'n N M SeyneCaptain18th Wiso'n G A FiskCaptain18th Wiso'n Wm BremmerCaptain18th Wiso'n D H SaxtonCaptain18th Wiso'n W B BellCaptain8th Iowa
Lew Wallace (search for this): article 1
ut an motion almost simultaneously. By 7 o'clock Lew Wallace opened the ball by shelling from the positions herange Nelson moved his division about the same time Wallace opened on the rebel batteries, forming in line of b game of a master. Let us trace it through. Lew Wallace's movements. In speaking of the opening of Monday's battle, I mentioned Major-General Lew Wallace's opening the ball at seven o'clock, by shelling with enfi. The instant Sherman came in to protect his left, Wallace advanced his infantry. The rebel battery at once l The other repel batteries at once did the same and Wallace's division, up in an instant, now that a master movupporting the skirmishers, and fresh regiments from Wallace's division came up in time to checkmate the game. Here unfortunately, Sherman's right gave way. Wallace's flank was exposed. He instantly formed Colonel Woon filled the place of his braked regiments, again Wallace's division poured forward, and again the enemy gave
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