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Neuse (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
ing the color sergeant's neck, is the guidance of a company called Col. Appel's Sharp-shooters. It bears this inscription, which has a pomo- air: "APPEALSsound in the Gores." "Cause" is doubtless the word intended; but I observe that Southern - graphy is peculiar. One troop of rebel horse is reported to have carried a black color, but I think this is an error. At least I saw but one cavalry regiment and they were horse of another color. After the battle, I took up my quarters in a farm house on the banks of the Neuse, whence I now write. What I need is, rest and There are three pretty girls here. I am in no hurry to move before the fleet of May. I have sent on my army, however, toward, Richmond. Later — Richmond is ours! Still Later--Richmond is not yet ours, but it will be as soon as we take it. The father and brothers of the three pretty girls have come home. They are soldiers. I shall not stay here much longer. McArone.
and found himself surrounded by a regiment of Mississippi rip- snorters. I immediately rode for ward, under a perfect storm of shot and shell, and raising myself in my stirrups, made faces at the foe. Terrified, they dropped their arms and fled. The lieutenant and I remained uninjured, laden with scalps and trophies. I captured several handsome flags. One is a large silk banner, with the following characteristic inscription, in white letters, white ground: "Strikes for Southern Wrights and Olmitey truth." Another, which I took with my own hands after wringing the color sergeant's neck, is the guidance of a company called Col. Appel's Sharp-shooters. It bears this inscription, which has a pomo- air: "APPEALSsound in the Gores." "Cause" is doubtless the word intended; but I observe that Southern - graphy is peculiar. One troop of rebel horse is reported to have carried a black color, but I think this is an error. At least I saw but one cavalry regiment a
sing myself in my stirrups, made faces at the foe. Terrified, they dropped their arms and fled. The lieutenant and I remained uninjured, laden with scalps and trophies. I captured several handsome flags. One is a large silk banner, with the following characteristic inscription, in white letters, white ground: "Strikes for Southern Wrights and Olmitey truth." Another, which I took with my own hands after wringing the color sergeant's neck, is the guidance of a company called Col. Appel's Sharp-shooters. It bears this inscription, which has a pomo- air: "APPEALSsound in the Gores." "Cause" is doubtless the word intended; but I observe that Southern - graphy is peculiar. One troop of rebel horse is reported to have carried a black color, but I think this is an error. At least I saw but one cavalry regiment and they were horse of another color. After the battle, I took up my quarters in a farm house on the banks of the Neuse, whence I now write. What I
ing the color sergeant's neck, is the guidance of a company called Col. Appel's Sharp-shooters. It bears this inscription, which has a pomo- air: "APPEALSsound in the Gores." "Cause" is doubtless the word intended; but I observe that Southern - graphy is peculiar. One troop of rebel horse is reported to have carried a black color, but I think this is an error. At least I saw but one cavalry regiment and they were horse of another color. After the battle, I took up my quarters in a farm house on the banks of the Neuse, whence I now write. What I need is, rest and There are three pretty girls here. I am in no hurry to move before the fleet of May. I have sent on my army, however, toward, Richmond. Later — Richmond is ours! Still Later--Richmond is not yet ours, but it will be as soon as we take it. The father and brothers of the three pretty girls have come home. They are soldiers. I shall not stay here much longer. McArone.