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Dixon, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 3
t the Atlantic, and here find vent for Mississippi and slander; and I would earnestly inquire wherein the of "Briton's" Government authorizes him to be heard in this Confederacy? He says that "nine-tenths of the Irish who come to this country their votes for a consideration." Are we to be governed by his or shall we take facts as they exist? No man, not wholly blind to truth and justice, and who has any knowledge of that class of Irish whose four have been cast south of Mason and Dixon's line, will deny for a moment that his assertion is utterly groundless and without the shadow of truth. In the cities of the Southern States, where the majority of them that come South usually locate, we find them with little education, consequently a hard working class of people and the larger portion of them as strenuous politicians and as firm in their political faith as any of the subjects of "Briton's" much "loved land" Where an opportunity is afforded them of cultivating their su
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 3
Great British." We are not aware that any such upas has been exhaling its deadly odor in the Confederacy; but admitting the American mind to the prejudiced against Great British, we would thick "Briton" the last man to admitted, when he says these same people "let their native land for their country's good, and are a disgrace to their race." If they be the people he represents them to be, be possible for them to poison the mind of a great and enlightened nation against the Government of Great Britain? We think not. Place it upon either hypothesis, and his arguments are equally fallacious. The Irish from every quarter of the Confederacy have responded nobly to their country's call Regiments battalions and companies have gone forth, many of them smiling with their blood their devotion to their adopted country upon every field, from the bombardment of Fort Sumter to the battle of Shiloh; and in no instance have they attempted to "shirk the responsibilities of American citizens;" a
Mason (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
om, he must the Atlantic, and here find vent for Mississippi and slander; and I would earnestly inquire wherein the of "Briton's" Government authorizes him to be heard in this Confederacy? He says that "nine-tenths of the Irish who come to this country their votes for a consideration." Are we to be governed by his or shall we take facts as they exist? No man, not wholly blind to truth and justice, and who has any knowledge of that class of Irish whose four have been cast south of Mason and Dixon's line, will deny for a moment that his assertion is utterly groundless and without the shadow of truth. In the cities of the Southern States, where the majority of them that come South usually locate, we find them with little education, consequently a hard working class of people and the larger portion of them as strenuous politicians and as firm in their political faith as any of the subjects of "Briton's" much "loved land" Where an opportunity is afforded them of cultivatin
United States (United States) (search for this): article 3
Richmond, April 24, 1862. To the Editors of the Dispatch: A communication of the Examiner, of the 23d inst., signed "A Briton," deserves some comment, and I ask permission, through your Columns, not as a native, but a descendant of fact much abused nation, to repel some of his false accusations, and as a representative at least, to defend them ever noble, brave and true refugees from down- trodden Ireland, who have sought and asylum in the Confederate States of America from British oppression. Not content withstanding beneath the iron heel of British tyranny the poor home, where he wrested him and crushed forever the last hope of freedom, he must the Atlantic, and here find vent for Mississippi and slander; and I would earnestly inquire wherein the of "Briton's" Government authorizes him to be heard in this Confederacy? He says that "nine-tenths of the Irish who come to this country their votes for a consideration." Are we to be governed by his or shal
Richmond, April 24, 1862. To the Editors of the Dispatch: A communication of the Examiner, of the 23d inst., signed "A Briton," deserves some comment, and I ask permission, through your Columns, not as a native, but a descendant of fact much abused nation, to repel some of his false accusations, and as a representative at least, to defend them ever noble, brave and true refugees from down- trodden Ireland, who have sought and asylum in the Confederate States of America from British oppression. Not content withstanding beneath the iron heel of British tyranny the poor home, where he wrested him and crushed forever the last hope of freedom, he must the Atlantic, and here find vent for Mississippi and slander; and I would earnestly inquire wherein the of "Briton's" Government authorizes him to be heard in this Confederacy? He says that "nine-tenths of the Irish who come to this country their votes for a consideration." Are we to be governed by his or shal
om every quarter of the Confederacy have responded nobly to their country's call Regiments battalions and companies have gone forth, many of them smiling with their blood their devotion to their adopted country upon every field, from the bombardment of Fort Sumter to the battle of Shiloh; and in no instance have they attempted to "shirk the responsibilities of American citizens;" and notwithstanding the unprovoked and unjust assault made upon us by "Briton;" whose much-loved Government looks with perfect indifference, upon our destruction, and seeks to profit by it with such noble patriots as Mitchell, , and a host of others, leading the van, we will on to the rescue of Southern independence, and then stand firm till the last battle is fought and the last victory is won, and freedom's banner again waves triumphantly over every Southern State, or fall gloriously at our post. Should we fall, we could then exclaim with a Woman soldier, "dulee et decorum, est pro patria mori." Erin.
Richmond, April 24, 1862. To the Editors of the Dispatch: A communication of the Examiner, of the 23d inst., signed "A Briton," deserves some comment, and I ask permission, through your Columns, not as a native, but a descendant of fact much abused nation, to repel some of his false accusations, and as a representative at least, to defend them ever noble, brave and true refugees from down- trodden Ireland, who have sought and asylum in the Confederate States of America from British oppression. Not content withstanding beneath the iron heel of British tyranny the poor home, where he wrested him and crushed forever the last hope of freedom, he must the Atlantic, and here find vent for Mississippi and slander; and I would earnestly inquire wherein the of "Briton's" Government authorizes him to be heard in this Confederacy? He says that "nine-tenths of the Irish who come to this country their votes for a consideration." Are we to be governed by his or shal
April 24th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 3
Richmond, April 24, 1862. To the Editors of the Dispatch: A communication of the Examiner, of the 23d inst., signed "A Briton," deserves some comment, and I ask permission, through your Columns, not as a native, but a descendant of fact much abused nation, to repel some of his false accusations, and as a representative at least, to defend them ever noble, brave and true refugees from down- trodden Ireland, who have sought and asylum in the Confederate States of America from British oppression. Not content withstanding beneath the iron heel of British tyranny the poor home, where he wrested him and crushed forever the last hope of freedom, he must the Atlantic, and here find vent for Mississippi and slander; and I would earnestly inquire wherein the of "Briton's" Government authorizes him to be heard in this Confederacy? He says that "nine-tenths of the Irish who come to this country their votes for a consideration." Are we to be governed by his or shall