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Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
le he claims a "success" at the second day's fight, he is forced to heavy disasters, and so far from there was any panic among the troops, confesses that they order, while he was unable to. Special report of Gen. Grant. Headquarters, Pittsburg Tenn., April 9. McLane, Adjutant General's of the Mississippi St. Louis --It becomes my duty again to battle fought between two great contending for the maintenance Government ever devised, and the destruction. It is pleasant to der Gens. and McCook arrived. New Wallace, at Crumple Landing, was ordered at an early hour morning to hold his division in readily moved in any direction to which it was ordered. At about eleven o'clock was delivered to move it up to Pittsburg owing to its being led by a circuit did not arrive in time to take part action. the night all was quiet, and feeling moral advantage would be gained being the attacking party, an advance as soon as day dawned, and the the gradual re
Warwick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
are continually signaling with the enemy on land, and visitors to our camp from the Yorktown side, represent unusual activity all along the enemy's lines. We may have something to do between this and morning. It is amusing to rend the Yankee accounts of what we are doing here. The Yankee papers make a great flourish about "having driven he rebels from a new battery they were erecting in the woods, three miles below Gloucester Point," &c., &c. Now, there is not a word of truth in the above. A detachment of cavalry have just crossed the river, en route for Urbana, on the Rappahannock. They represent that the Yankees have cut a pitch from Warwick river to York river, thus opening water communication all along their lines, and securing for themselves a water front behind which they can fall whenever hard pressed. When we take into consideration the sandy nature of the soil here, and he vast resources of the enemy in men and horses, this statement is not at all improbable.
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): article 1
s soon as his wounds are healed.--He is confident that, though he can no longer wield a musket or a sword, his presence in the hour of peril will inspire his gallant comrades in arms, the "Continentals," to further deeds of noble daring. The Mississippi Valley. The army correspondent of the Mobile Register, writing from Memphis, April 12th, is disposed to take a discouraging view of affairs in that direction. We copy a portion of the letter: The condition of affairs up the Mississippi river is by no means satisfactory. The reduction of Island 10, though anticipated, is a very serious blow, and will be followed soon, I fear, by the fall of Fort Pillow. There would be no difficulty in holding the river against gunboats alone, but the case is very different when there is a large co-operating land force. I need not refer to the deplorable consequences that would follow the fall of Fort Pillow; they will readily occur to the mind of every intelligent reader. Five of th
Urbanna (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 1
are continually signaling with the enemy on land, and visitors to our camp from the Yorktown side, represent unusual activity all along the enemy's lines. We may have something to do between this and morning. It is amusing to rend the Yankee accounts of what we are doing here. The Yankee papers make a great flourish about "having driven he rebels from a new battery they were erecting in the woods, three miles below Gloucester Point," &c., &c. Now, there is not a word of truth in the above. A detachment of cavalry have just crossed the river, en route for Urbana, on the Rappahannock. They represent that the Yankees have cut a pitch from Warwick river to York river, thus opening water communication all along their lines, and securing for themselves a water front behind which they can fall whenever hard pressed. When we take into consideration the sandy nature of the soil here, and he vast resources of the enemy in men and horses, this statement is not at all improbable.
Cockspur Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ers. The Yankee writer says that "the troops in the fort marched out and stacked their arms, and the officers surrendered their swords and small arms to Major Halpim, with a few remarks as they laid down their weapons. The officers were greatly chagrined, of course, at the result, but talked as boldly and defiantly as ever." Terms of capitulation. The following are the terms of capitulation agreed upon for the surrender to the forces of the United States of Fort Pulaski, Cockspur Island, Georgia: Article 1.--The fort, armament, and garrison to be surrendered to the forces of the United States. Article 2.--The officers and men of the garrison to be allowed to take with them all their private effects, such as clothing, bedding, books, &c.; this is not to include private weapons. Article 3.--The sick and wounded, under charge of the hospital steward of the garrison, to be sent under a flag of truce to the Confederate lines, and at the same time the men to be allo
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
owed to take with them all their private effects, such as clothing, bedding, books, &c.; this is not to include private weapons. Article 3.--The sick and wounded, under charge of the hospital steward of the garrison, to be sent under a flag of truce to the Confederate lines, and at the same time the men to be allowed to send any letters they may desire, subject to the inspection of a Federal officer. Signed this 11th day of April, 1862. Chas. H. Olmstead, Col. First Vol. Reg't of Georgia, Fort Pulaski. Q. A. Gilmore, Brigadier-General Volunteers, commanding United States forces, Tybee Island, Ga. The document was sent to the district commander, and accompanied by the following communication from the General of the attacking brigade: Fort Pulaski, Ga., April 11, 1862. General H. A. Benham, Commanding Northern District Department of the South, Tybee Island, Ga.: Sir --I have the honor to transmit herewith the terms of capitulation for the surrender
Forked Deer River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
ened fire upon the garrison. The bombardment continued without results up to 10 o'clock, at which hour the courtier left. Firing was heard here as late as 2 P. M. by persons who were out on the river, and again on yesterday, (Monday.) The town is full of wild rumors — some of them going so far as to state that the fort has fallen. I hear, also, from sources supposed to be entirely reliable, that a considerable body of men has been landed by the Federals above Fort Pillow, on the Forked Deer river. The transports were enabled to ascend the river some distance, owing to the high stage of the water. The forces there landed will doubtless seek to invest the Fort by land, and will co-operate with the gunboats on the Mississippi. Fort Pillow, as you have heretofore been informed, is situated just above the mouth of the Harchie river, and is seventy miles above Memphis by water and thirty by land. The enemy is moving out also from the lower Tennessee, through Paris, across the
Tybee River (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
t my disposal, it is hoped you will see fit to avert the useless waste of life. This communication will be carried to you under a flag of truce by Lieut. J. H. Wilson, United States Army, who is authorized to wait any period not exceeding thirty minutes from delivery for your answer. I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient servant, David Hunter, Major General Commanding. [reply.] Headquarters Fort Pulaski, April 10, 1862. Major-General David Hunter, commanding on Tybee River. Sir --I have to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of this date, demanding the unconditional surrender of Fort Pulaski. In reply I can only say that I am here to defend the fort, not to surrender it. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Chas. H. Olmstead, In the two days bombardment, according to the Northern accounts, the Confederates had one man killed and four wounded, and the Federals had one man killed. It will cost th
Tybee Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Pulaski, which, it seems, was preceded by the following correspondence between the Federal commander and Col. Olmstead: Headq'rs, Department of South, Tybee Island, Ga., April 10, 1862. To the Commanding Officer, Fort Pulaski: Sir --I hereby demand of you the immediate surrender and restoration of Fort Pulaski to the 1862. Chas. H. Olmstead, Col. First Vol. Reg't of Georgia, Fort Pulaski. Q. A. Gilmore, Brigadier-General Volunteers, commanding United States forces, Tybee Island, Ga. The document was sent to the district commander, and accompanied by the following communication from the General of the attacking brigade: Fort Pulaski, Ga., April 11, 1862. General H. A. Benham, Commanding Northern District Department of the South, Tybee Island, Ga.: Sir --I have the honor to transmit herewith the terms of capitulation for the surrender to the United States of Fort Pulaski, Ga., signed by me this 11th day of April, 1862. I trust these term
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
d, is a very serious blow, and will be followed soon, I fear, by the fall of Fort Pillow. There would be no difficulty in holding the river against gunboats alone, need not refer to the deplorable consequences that would follow the fall of Fort Pillow; they will readily occur to the mind of every intelligent reader. Five of the enemy's gunboats and three mortar boats proceeded to Fort Pillow Sunday morning, the 13th, and opened fire upon the garrison. The bombardment continued withoiable, that a considerable body of men has been landed by the Federals above Fort Pillow, on the Forked Deer river. The transports were enabled to ascend the river the Fort by land, and will co-operate with the gunboats on the Mississippi. Fort Pillow, as you have heretofore been informed, is situated just above the mouth of teir intention is supposed to be to occupy that part of the State lying above Fort Pillow and between the lower Tennessee and Mississippi rivers, and gradually to adv
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