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s a very serious blow, and will be followed soon, I fear, by the fall of Fort Pillow. There would be no difficulty in holding the river against gunboats alone, but the case is very different when there is a large co-operating land force. I need not refer to the deplorable consequences that would follow the fall of Fort Pillow; they will readily occur to the mind of every intelligent reader. Five of the enemy's gunboats and three mortar boats proceeded to Fort Pillow Sunday morning, the 13th, and opened fire upon the garrison. The bombardment continued without results up to 10 o'clock, at which hour the courtier left. Firing was heard here as late as 2 P. M. by persons who were out on the river, and again on yesterday, (Monday.) The town is full of wild rumors — some of them going so far as to state that the fort has fallen. I hear, also, from sources supposed to be entirely reliable, that a considerable body of men has been landed by the Federals above Fort Pillow, on the
that and other measures of the session destroy slavery in the States. He that in one instance ninety slaves had best through Baltimore from Banks's to Philadelphia, and that forty five belonging to a loyal citizen of Kentucky had been sent by military authority to The military arm was used to take to the free States, and without the which were made to the return of future slaves by military officers to their own interesting scene occurred in the U. S. Representatives on the 16th, while making an appropriation of thirty dollars to enable the Government to the two and three year volunteers was consideration. Dawes, of Mass., said it would be to have some friend give a information as to where this thirty was going. There were, he knew, regiments, composing all officers, their pay, and not in active service. Vallandigham of Ohio, said it was, to rumor, not to meet a deficiency, provide for a defalcation in the War . Blair, of Mo.--I ask the gentle
April 9th (search for this): article 1
The War. of Shiloh--Gen'l Grant's report — Doings at the --news from the South &c., &c. below the official report of General officer who commanded the Federate the battle of Shiloh. It will be while he claims a "success" at the second day's fight, he is forced to heavy disasters, and so far from there was any panic among the troops, confesses that they order, while he was unable to. Special report of Gen. Grant. Headquarters, Pittsburg Tenn., April 9. McLane, Adjutant General's of the Mississippi St. Louis --It becomes my duty again to battle fought between two great contending for the maintenance Government ever devised, and the destruction. It is pleasant to of the army contending for principles. morning our pickets were driven in by the enemy. five divisions stationed at this drawn up in line of battle to meet battle soon waxed warm on the varying at times to all parts It was the most continuous firing and artiller
April 16th (search for this): article 1
ed and left the field was greater than ours. In an estimate cannot he made, as of them must have been sent to Corinth that points. The enemy suffered terri demoralization and desertion. of truce was sent to-day from General Beauregard. I enclose a copy of the correspondence. I am, respectfully,Your obd't servant, U. S. Grant, Major-General Commanding. Doings at Washington. for the abolition of slavery in the of Columbia was signed by President Lincoln on the 16th of April. In his announcing the fact, he says he has desired to see the National Capital from the institution in some satisfactory . debate on the Confiscation bill, Senate well, of Kentucky, argued that the that and other measures of the session destroy slavery in the States. He that in one instance ninety slaves had best through Baltimore from Banks's to Philadelphia, and that forty five belonging to a loyal citizen of Kentucky had been sent by military authority to The mili
April 22nd (search for this): article 1
oyal Ferry with two field pieces, and fired into a small house on the farther side of the river, which was known to be occupied by the enemy's pickets. Eight rushed out and fled.--Several shots were fired after them, and some of Capt. Leake's men say they saw the Yankees pick up and carry off one of their number, whether killed or wounded is not known; nor is it known whether any were killed in the house. From York river. We copy the following from the Gloucester Point letter of April 22d, in the Lynchburg Virginian: I have just returned from a tour of observation down the river, a report having reached us about midnight, that fifty vessels were anchored in the mouth of the bay below here, and that a number had gone up a creek near us at this place. We found the bay full of any number of small craft, but the only war vessels in sight were those that had annoyed us so much here for some days past, viz: the steamers Penobscot, Marblehead, and Wachusett, with a small gunb
April 10th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
rs contain full accounts of the bombardment and surrender of Fort Pulaski, which, it seems, was preceded by the following correspondence between the Federal commander and Col. Olmstead: Headq'rs, Department of South, Tybee Island, Ga., April 10, 1862. To the Commanding Officer, Fort Pulaski: Sir --I hereby demand of you the immediate surrender and restoration of Fort Pulaski to the authority and possession of the United States. This demand is made with a view to avoiding, if p who is authorized to wait any period not exceeding thirty minutes from delivery for your answer. I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient servant, David Hunter, Major General Commanding. [reply.] Headquarters Fort Pulaski, April 10, 1862. Major-General David Hunter, commanding on Tybee River. Sir --I have to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of this date, demanding the unconditional surrender of Fort Pulaski. In reply I can only say that I am here to d
April 11th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
te lines, and at the same time the men to be allowed to send any letters they may desire, subject to the inspection of a Federal officer. Signed this 11th day of April, 1862. Chas. H. Olmstead, Col. First Vol. Reg't of Georgia, Fort Pulaski. Q. A. Gilmore, Brigadier-General Volunteers, commanding United States forces, Tycument was sent to the district commander, and accompanied by the following communication from the General of the attacking brigade: Fort Pulaski, Ga., April 11, 1862. General H. A. Benham, Commanding Northern District Department of the South, Tybee Island, Ga.: Sir --I have the honor to transmit herewith the terms of capitulation for the surrender to the United States of Fort Pulaski, Ga., signed by me this 11th day of April, 1862. I trust these terms will receive your approval, they being substantially those authorized by you as commander of the district. The fort hoisted the white flag at a quarter before two o'clock this afterno
December, 4 AD (search for this): article 1
left hand and forearm were shot off, thus completely mutilating him. He was in New Orleans a few days ago, but still determined to return to his regiment as soon as his wounds are healed.--He is confident that, though he can no longer wield a musket or a sword, his presence in the hour of peril will inspire his gallant comrades in arms, the "Continentals," to further deeds of noble daring. The Mississippi Valley. The army correspondent of the Mobile Register, writing from Memphis, April 12th, is disposed to take a discouraging view of affairs in that direction. We copy a portion of the letter: The condition of affairs up the Mississippi river is by no means satisfactory. The reduction of Island 10, though anticipated, is a very serious blow, and will be followed soon, I fear, by the fall of Fort Pillow. There would be no difficulty in holding the river against gunboats alone, but the case is very different when there is a large co-operating land force. I need not refer
ugh, it would be well to trust in God and keep our faith strong and firm in the helmsman who directs the ship. The last Loans in the battle of Shiloh. A Texas Ranger, who was wounded in the skirmish the day after the grand battle of Shifton, communicates to the New Orleans True Delta the following authentic account of the affair: Two hundred Texas Rangers, under command of Major Harrison, acting as a rear guard to our army, together with about one hundred cavalry from Colonel Adams's and Colonel Forrest a regiments, (the number from each I do not know,) discovered the enemy in force of one regiment, and one battalion of infantry and three hundred cavalry, about one or one and a half miles beyond Michie's (or Micky's) house, on Tuesday afternoon. The enemy had thrown forward their infantry battalion, deploying skirmishers and sharpshooters in a deserted encampment, about two hundred yards from our cavalry, which had been formed in line of battle in an old field. Th
Joe Banks (search for this): article 1
ding. Doings at Washington. for the abolition of slavery in the of Columbia was signed by President Lincoln on the 16th of April. In his announcing the fact, he says he has desired to see the National Capital from the institution in some satisfactory . debate on the Confiscation bill, Senate well, of Kentucky, argued that the that and other measures of the session destroy slavery in the States. He that in one instance ninety slaves had best through Baltimore from Banks's to Philadelphia, and that forty five belonging to a loyal citizen of Kentucky had been sent by military authority to The military arm was used to take to the free States, and without the which were made to the return of future slaves by military officers to their own interesting scene occurred in the U. S. Representatives on the 16th, while making an appropriation of thirty dollars to enable the Government to the two and three year volunteers was consideration. Dawes
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