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Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 15
n crossing over from the Shenandoah Valley to unite eight thousand more to the force — making a total column of forty-six thousand men, if the figures are reliable. We are in sufficient force in front of Manassas to manage this rebel army. The roads to Manassas and beyond are horrible. My informant was twenty-eight hours in coming from near Warrenton Junction to Washington by railroad. From Buffalo Gap — reported capture of Confederates. New York, April 25. --The Times's Wheeling dispatch says that General Milroy overtook on Monday the rear guard of the rebel cavalry, six miles west of the railroad, near Buffalo Gap. The rebels fled, and were pursued by our cavalry. General Milroy learned that the main body of the rebels stopped on Sunday night six miles beyond Buffalo Gap, but being cut off from Staunton by General Banks, fled southwest through Bath and Allegheny counties for the head waters of the James river. Eight rebels, including the guerilla Barnet, were ca
Westmoreland County (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 15
From Buffalo Gap — reported capture of Confederates. New York, April 25. --The Times's Wheeling dispatch says that General Milroy overtook on Monday the rear guard of the rebel cavalry, six miles west of the railroad, near Buffalo Gap. The rebels fled, and were pursued by our cavalry. General Milroy learned that the main body of the rebels stopped on Sunday night six miles beyond Buffalo Gap, but being cut off from Staunton by General Banks, fled southwest through Bath and Allegheny counties for the head waters of the James river. Eight rebels, including the guerilla Barnet, were captured in Pendleton county. From Washington — the French Minister's visit to Richmond — the slave trade treaty. Washington, April 24. --The French Minister, M. Henri Mercier, returned here to-day in the frigate Gassendi, from Richmond via Norfolk. Soon after his arrival he visited the State Department, and had a long and doubtless interesting interview with Secretary Seward. <
Pendleton (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 15
that General Milroy overtook on Monday the rear guard of the rebel cavalry, six miles west of the railroad, near Buffalo Gap. The rebels fled, and were pursued by our cavalry. General Milroy learned that the main body of the rebels stopped on Sunday night six miles beyond Buffalo Gap, but being cut off from Staunton by General Banks, fled southwest through Bath and Allegheny counties for the head waters of the James river. Eight rebels, including the guerilla Barnet, were captured in Pendleton county. From Washington — the French Minister's visit to Richmond — the slave trade treaty. Washington, April 24. --The French Minister, M. Henri Mercier, returned here to-day in the frigate Gassendi, from Richmond via Norfolk. Soon after his arrival he visited the State Department, and had a long and doubtless interesting interview with Secretary Seward. The French Minister states that he never heard until his arrival here of Dr. Lemoine, who is said by the Richmond p
Monterey, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 15
s hardly ever published in their journals whenever a lie will subserve their purposes. From Pittsburg Landing — reported success of a Federal Reconnaissance under General Smith, &c. Pittsburg Landing, April 24. --A reconnoitring party, under Brigadier-General A. J. Smith, left here this morning, and attacked the enemy's pickets, one hundred and fifty strong, who fled in great haste, leaving their knapsacks, blankets, and everything else. The party then proceeded on to Pea Ridge, Tennessee, where they found 3,000 or 4,000 rebels drawn up in line of battle, who, at the first fire of our artillery, also decamped, leaving their tents, camp equipage, private baggage, and even half written letters, and other things, indicating the completeness of the surprise. Enough tents were left to accommodate a division. Everything was burned. We captured, twelve prisoners, none of whom expressed regret at being taken. They say the people South are getting sick of the war.
Poland (Poland) (search for this): article 15
--The following dispatch has been received at the War Department: Wheeling, Va., April 24. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: A dispatch from General Schenck states that a squad of twenty-five infantry, sent from Romney by Lieutenant-Colonel Donny to look after the guerillas, was attacked yesterday morning on Grass Lick, between Lick river and Carapion, by the rebels, forty strong. Our forces lost three killed, but drove the rebels, who took refuge in the house of one Poland. Colonel Donney went with a reinforcement of cavalry, but the rebels fled at his approach, carrying off several dead and wounded, among the latter Colonel Parsons, their leader, and Palland, the owner of the house. Col. Donney reports that the interior of the house was covered with blood. He burnt the house and pursued the flying enemy, taking five prisoners. Gen. Schenck sent a reinforcement of 160 cavalry, and one piece of Debeck's artillery, to come on the enemy in the rear.--They
Tiptonville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 15
go Tribune)--Gen. Bragg has transferred the command of Fort Pillow to Gen. Price. From Pittsburg we have intelligence of a skirmish with the enemy, in which General Granger, with 500 cavalry, participated, about two miles from our pickets. Our forces came in contact with the rebel pickets and drove them in, and then encountered a strong force of rebel cavalry. After fighting for an hour both sides retired. The loss was light. A triweekly packet is now running from Cairo to Tiptonville. Mails and passengers from Com Foote's flotillas, off Fort Wright, arrived here yesterday afternoon. There was no change in affairs. From Yorktown — preparations for the Siege rapidly Processing — a Hard Yarn. Headquarters Army of the Potomac, near Yorktown, April 24. --The weather is again pleasant, and the roads are beginning to improve. The preparations for carrying out the plans of the Commander-in-Chief are being rapidly pushed forward to completion. Two deserter
Somerset County (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 15
n, has arrived here with two more prisoners and another prize. The Hercules brings to the port two prisoners, one of whom is a man that our Government has been looking for since last fall. He has been constantly going between Maryland and Richmond, taking over mails and other matters of great importance to the enemy, and only returned from Virginia on the 11th of this month. It was with great difficulty that he was secured, as after a long search through his house at Anamnesis, Somerset county, Md., he was found in a very small place, having crawled through a trap door in the ceiling of an upper room to get there. After securing him and another important person, the Hercules started for the Great Wicomico river.--Soon after entering that river a schooner was discovered endeavoring to escape.--She was soon overhauled, however, The men on board, finding escape with the vessel impossible, left the vessel and pulled for the shore. The vessel was taken possession of, and found to b
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 15
nd via Norfolk. Soon after his arrival he visited the State Department, and had a long and doubtless interesting interview with Secretary Seward. The French Minister states that he never heard until his arrival here of Dr. Lemoine, who is said by the Richmond papers to have had an interview with the Minister, and to have represented 30,000 Frenchmen. The Senate, in Executive session to-day, confirmed the nomination of Martin Metcalf, of Michigan, as Consul at Agua Callentes, Mexico; and of Horatio King, Ex-Postmaster General, as one of the Commissioners under the act for the abolishment of slavery in the District of Columbia. The Beard will be at once organized. The Senate to-day, by a unanimous vote, ratified the Seward-Lyons treaty recently negotiated here for the suppression of the African slave trade. This is deemed a most important treaty, which will probably sweep the last vestige of the piratical traffic from the face of the seas. Captures by the U.
Lowry's Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 15
ays he belongs to company B, 10th Virginia regiment of infantry. This regiment has been on the Rappahannock, according to previous information. The prisoner says it joined Jackson at his present location, near Stanardsville, from Culpeper. N. P. Banks, Major General Commanding. From the Rappahannock. Washington, April 25. --The steamer Yankee arrived here this morning from the neighborhood of Fredericksburg, and reports that one day this week the Anacosta while passing Lowry's Point on the Rappahannock, was fired upon by a small body of rebel infantry. She threw a few shells, thus rapidly dispersing them. The flotilla is still actively engaged seizing rebel craft, and in all it has captured sixteen rebel schooners. Washington, April 22.--An officer of artillery in town to-night, from near Warrenton Junction, reports the rebels in strong force on the south bank of the Rappahannock, in the direction of Gordonsville. General Ewell is said to be at the crossing
Donelson (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 15
of Shiloh. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Press writing from the Tennessee battle-field, gives this estimate of the casualties to the Yankees at the battle of Shiloh: No accurate list of the killed and wounded can be made for some time. From the best authority I can gather, I judge our killed will amount to two thousand, and our wounded and missing to eight thousand more, of whom four thousand or five thousand are prisoners. Some of the regiments which were badly cut up at Donelson will have to be disbanded. In one--the Eleventh Illinois--there are only 100 men left. In others all the field officers and most of the Captains are killed.--The Eighteenth Wisconsin regiment was a raw regiment, recruited from the pineries, and composed of the hardiest and best of that celebrated locality — men who hunt and trap all winter, and work in lumber-mills all summer. They went into battle less than two weeks after leaving Milwaukee, 260 strong. Their Colonel and Major were
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