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Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 3
at the public may understand the plan of the Federal attack upon New Orleans, we copy from a Baltimore American, published in March last, the following: Commodore David D. Porter's mortar fleet, with the Harriet Lane as the flagship, left Ship Island on the 14th inst., and was to be followed in a few days by Commodore Farrgut's fleet of also pro-of-war and gunboats. Their destination was understood to be the Southwest Pass from which they were to open fire on Forts Jackson and Philip, whi whole fleet directly under their guns, and by repeated broadside of grape and shrapnel, endeavor to drive the gunners from their position. We may, therefore, expect exciting news from New Orleans in a few days. The troops still remain at Ship Island, and were in good health and spirits. They were being perfected in drill, and becoming most efficient troops. Gen. Butter had not arrived when the Constitution left, but they passed him going in with reinforcements. Affairs year C
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 3
demolished his humble dwelling — compelled his wife to cook her own provisions for them by fire made from the loge of the house, and on leaving carried off the bacon and other necessaries laid in for the use of the family. Description of Fort Pillow. This fort, which the telegraph advises us the Federal commence bombarding lately, is thus described by a camp correspondent: Fort Pillow, where we are now encamped, is on the Tennessee side of the Mississippi, about twenty miles abovFort Pillow, where we are now encamped, is on the Tennessee side of the Mississippi, about twenty miles above Randolph, and about eighty-five miles above Memphis. It is an immense entrenched camp, situated in the pilus of the hilliest of the Tennessee hills — The fortifications on the river consist of a rifle battery (six 82-pounder') on the bluff and the water battery below, thirteen 82-pounders, smooth bore, and one 11 inch Columbia, now being mounted. A deep ditch, rampant, and fine military road, extend from the river front on the right to the river front on the left, in the form of a horse sho
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 3
ith reinforcements. Affairs year Corinth. From a gentlemen who left Corinth on the 20th of April, the Atalante Commonwealth learns that the main body of the Federal previously nine miles from the recent battle-field, have fallen still further back, leaving nothing but a strong picket-guard to protect their old encampment. The motive for this is supposed to be either to divert Beauregard's attention from Corinth, and to weaken his force there, or else they intend to go down the Tennessee river in gunboats, march across the country, and make a direct attack upon Memphis Gen. Beauregard remains quiet behind his fortifications, and it is not known that he designs any early movements upon the enemy. His lines have not been extended by this recent movement of his foe, and very little skirmishing occurs. The officers of the army are confident that the great battle of the West must be fought at Corinth, and, 'tis said, that a council of war has decided upon the retaining of all th
Southwest (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 3
D. Porter's mortar fleet, with the Harriet Lane as the flagship, left Ship Island on the 14th inst., and was to be followed in a few days by Commodore Farrgut's fleet of also pro-of-war and gunboats. Their destination was understood to be the Southwest Pass from which they were to open fire on Forts Jackson and Philip, which guard the passage to New Orleans. The departure of this immense fleet is reported to have been a grand sight, stretching, in line for many miles along the ocean, as far the Constitution that the work of reducing Forts Jackson and Philip was commenced somedays since. It was supposed that some of the mortar boats would take position in an inlet in the rear of Fort Jackson, while the others would advance up the Southwest Pass within shelling distance and endeavor to drive the forces out of the forts. In the meantime the gun boats would silence a battery created about a mile below the forts for the protection of a barricade in the river intended to prevent the
Fort Macon (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
Beef128 barrels Mess Pork170 barrels Flour and Hard Oread700 barrels Rice60 tierces Coffee3,000 lbs Sugar7,000 lbs Vinegar6 bbls Candles660 lbs Soap800 lbs Salt5 bushels Delta Apples85 bushels Welskey5 bb's Molasses2,000 gall's Fort Macon. The Wilmington Journal, of Saturday last, says: We have a rumor this morning from Fort Macon. It is vague, and we give it for what it is worth. It appears to be pretty certain that the fort is not taken. The rumor adds that CoFort Macon. It is vague, and we give it for what it is worth. It appears to be pretty certain that the fort is not taken. The rumor adds that Col. White has been able to prevent the enemy from erecting any batteries fear enough to the sort to be dangerous to it, as he sweeps the banks with his guns, and fires on every craft that makes its appearance within range. Also, that the enemy had for the time ceased firing, and there was only an occasional gun from the fort when they made any move or showed themselves near enough.
Tazewell (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
The War. We make up the following summary from the latest papers received at this office. Another Morgan. The Tazewell (Va.) Democrat, of the 19th inst., chronicles a brilliant exploit performed by one of the brave men of the Wests: Our citizens were startled last week by the news of a Union force approaching this county by way of Tug river, under the leadership of Lieut. Newman; whereupon about 50 brave cavillers from the east end of the county, joined by a portion of the 8th Virginia cavalry, hastily set off to meet this band of thieves and murderers, determined to capture them if possible. After proceeding some distance, they learned that the enemy camped on the Laurel Fork of Tug the night before they started in pursuit of them, and had from that point already commenced retracting their steps. Our cavalry finding it impossible to overtake the retreating enemy, abandoned the pursuit, and returned home, but vengeance did not stop here. Newman and his band as
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 3
d yards of the batteries, and no boots, of however light draught, can pass at a greater distance. It would seem impossible, from the nature of its defences, that artillery could be brought to bear on any point, and that, well provisioned and garrisoned, it could hold out against the whole army and navy of the Lincolnites. The Mississippi. In urging the adoption of every means for he defence of the Mississippi, the Vicksburg Whig says: If we lose the Mississippi, we lose Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas. We lose all the sugar, and much of the stock and grain-growing lands of the Confederacy. They will be cut off and of no benefit to us. The East will be severed from the West A complete possession of all the territory west of the Mississippi is a physical and moral essential to our cause. The branches of a mutual commerce, of idea, sentiment, trade, and blood, are warped together more closely than the knurled boughs of those kindred forests, which attach a wining br
Fort Wayne (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 3
the eye could reach, in the following order: First Division.--Schooners Norfolk Packet, Olive A. Lee C. V. William, Arietta, Wm. Barron, Sophronia. Second Division.--Schooners Z. A. Ward, Sidney C. Jones, Matthew Vessey, Maria J. Carlton, Orvitta, Adolph Huge, Geo Mangham. Third Division.--Bark Horace Beals; schrs John Griffith, Sarah Brine, Racar, bring Sea Foam; schrs Henry James, Dan Smith. Reserve Steamers.--Steamers Occorurs, Harriet Lane, Owaska, Westfield, Cliff on, Miami, Jackson, R. B. Forhe. Com. Farragut's fleet consists of the sloop-of-war Harford, (his flag ship,) the Pensacola, the Brooklyn, and the abbots Pinola Sciota; Itaska, and most of the other ten new gunboats recently built, with other small class war steamer, said to number twenty three in all. It is presumed by the officers on board the Constitution that the work of reducing Forts Jackson and Philip was commenced somedays since. It was supposed that some of the mortar boats would t
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 3
the batteries, and no boots, of however light draught, can pass at a greater distance. It would seem impossible, from the nature of its defences, that artillery could be brought to bear on any point, and that, well provisioned and garrisoned, it could hold out against the whole army and navy of the Lincolnites. The Mississippi. In urging the adoption of every means for he defence of the Mississippi, the Vicksburg Whig says: If we lose the Mississippi, we lose Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas. We lose all the sugar, and much of the stock and grain-growing lands of the Confederacy. They will be cut off and of no benefit to us. The East will be severed from the West A complete possession of all the territory west of the Mississippi is a physical and moral essential to our cause. The branches of a mutual commerce, of idea, sentiment, trade, and blood, are warped together more closely than the knurled boughs of those kindred forests, which attach a wining brotherhood a
Wyoming (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): article 3
y finding it impossible to overtake the retreating enemy, abandoned the pursuit, and returned home, but vengeance did not stop here. Newman and his band as they came up had captured some ten or fifteen of the most prominent Secessionists in Wyoming, and there were brave hearts lying in ambush to avenge these and the many other outrages committed upon good and loyal citizens of that county. Newman was in advance of the main force some miles riding beside W. H.Henderson one of his captiths, have well nigh reduced to destitution a country once flourishing and prosperous. The name of the man who has thus relieved his country of the presence of a monster, and for a time put his blind followers to flight, is George Morgan, of Wyoming, who is now here sporting the veritable coat, cap, revolter, and sword, decorated with Federal insignia," that graded the form of the Union chief. He has also Newman's pocket-book, filled with effected papers from Headquarters. Department of W
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