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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: May 6, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 3
irst blush of excitement is past there will still be found men ready to approve and carry out the President's policy. But let us look calmly at this tremendous project. It is a proposition to buy up four millions of slaves, at a cost to the United States of some £400,000,000 or £00,000,000 sterling. When the Parliament of this country, in the cause of humanity, voted £20,000,000 to the emancipation of the slaves in British colonies, the world was astonished. They could not comprehend the unch the originality of the design may command our admiration. Is the President in earnest? Does he really propose this gigantic measure as a solution of all the difficulties which are now overwhelming the Government and the people of the United States; or does he put it forward as a device to detach the border States from the Southern cause, and to gain for the North the sympathies of the world? His mode of introducing it is cautious in the extreme. Its operation is to be gradual; the sc
English opinion of American affairs.Lincoln's scheme of emancipation. [From the London Herald — Opposition organ.] If the tone of the American press, in discussing President Lincoln's massage, is undecided and halting, the English public will readily be excused for not jumping at once, to a conclusion respecting its merits asPresident Lincoln's massage, is undecided and halting, the English public will readily be excused for not jumping at once, to a conclusion respecting its merits as the programme of the policy of the United States Government, the honesty of its purpose, and the possibility of its realization. The secret seems to have been well kept to the last moment, and the effect of its publication, we can readily imagine, must have been electric. But when the first surprise was over, and the American miof, and resolutely bent on accomplishing their freedom from a despotism as black as any the Old World can show, is to ignore history. We believe, then, that President Lincoln's project is not feasible. The North cannot, the South will not, accept it. Both sides will, we believes, regard it as a dishonoring compromise. By the Nor
English Aires (search for this): article 3
to any reunion with the Northern States as it was twelve months ago. No doubt slavery lies at the bottom of the deadly hate of these two sections of the American people. But it is not for their slaves that the South is now fighting. It is fighting for independence, for its rights, for rights which the Constitution elaborated by the fathers of the Republics consecrated to it, and for honor, and to suppose that the Union can be rebuilt over the prostrate necks of a people tracing back to English Aires their hatred of tyranny, cherishing the traditions which Englishmen are proud of, and resolutely bent on accomplishing their freedom from a despotism as black as any the Old World can show, is to ignore history. We believe, then, that President Lincoln's project is not feasible. The North cannot, the South will not, accept it. Both sides will, we believes, regard it as a dishonoring compromise. By the North it will be looked upon as a humiliating concession in the hour of victory; by