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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: May 7, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 11 total hits in 5 results.

Pass Christian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 1
[from the Mobile evening news, April 28th.]from New Orleans. The steamer C. W. Dorrence, Captain Hopkins, arrived this morning from the Ringlets, which she reached at 8 o'clock Saturday morning and left in the evening, putting into Pass Christian to avoid some of the enemy, who were in sight. She left Pass Christian at 10 o'clock last night. The latest news she brings is that telegraphed to us from the Bay of St. Louis. It was understood that the city would be occupied at 2 o'clock Pass Christian at 10 o'clock last night. The latest news she brings is that telegraphed to us from the Bay of St. Louis. It was understood that the city would be occupied at 2 o'clock to-morrow. All the cotton was rolled into the public squares and burned, and the sugar and molasses on the levee rolled into the river. The dry docks, shipping of every description, and steamboats were burned, except some of these last, which took troops up the river to destroy the cotton on the bank. The gunboats, after making a single trip over the lake with soldiers, were burned. --Captain He is sure they could have been brought to Mobile. At the last intelligence fighting was sti
John T. Monroe (search for this): article 1
he gun-carriages burning as she passed. About 10,000 bales of cotton were burned in the city, and perhaps 1,000 escaped the flames. A large fire was seen in the city Friday night, but what it was could not be made out. We append Mayor Monroe's proclamation to the citizens: To the people of New Orleans. Mayoralty of New Orleans, City Hall, April 25, 1862. After an obstinate and heroic defence by our troops on the river, there appears to be imminent danger that the insold now threaten the city. In view of this contingency, I call on you to be calm, not with submissiveness nor with indecent alacrity, but if the military authorities are unable longer to defend you, to await with hope and confidence the inevitable moment when the valor of your sons and of your fellow- countrymen will achieve your deliverance. I shall remain among you to protect you and your property so far as my power of authority as Chief Magistrate can avail. John T. Monroe, Mayor.
[from the Mobile evening news, April 28th.]from New Orleans. The steamer C. W. Dorrence, Captain Hopkins, arrived this morning from the Ringlets, which she reached at 8 o'clock Saturday morning and left in the evening, putting into Pass Christian to avoid some of the enemy, who were in sight. She left Pass Christian at 10 o'clock last night. The latest news she brings is that telegraphed to us from the Bay of St. Louis. It was understood that the city would be occupied at 2 o'clock to-morrow. All the cotton was rolled into the public squares and burned, and the sugar and molasses on the levee rolled into the river. The dry docks, shipping of every description, and steamboats were burned, except some of these last, which took troops up the river to destroy the cotton on the bank. The gunboats, after making a single trip over the lake with soldiers, were burned. --Captain He is sure they could have been brought to Mobile. At the last intelligence fighting was st
April 25th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
more coming. The Watson took a load of passengers across the lake before she finally left. Fort Pike was evacuated and the gun-carriages burning as she passed. About 10,000 bales of cotton were burned in the city, and perhaps 1,000 escaped the flames. A large fire was seen in the city Friday night, but what it was could not be made out. We append Mayor Monroe's proclamation to the citizens: To the people of New Orleans. Mayoralty of New Orleans, City Hall, April 25, 1862. After an obstinate and heroic defence by our troops on the river, there appears to be imminent danger that the insolent enemy will succeed in capturing your city. The forts have not fallen. They have not succumbed even beneath the terrors of a bombardment unparalleled in the history of war fare. Their defenders have done all that becomes men fighting for their homes, their country, and their liberty; but in spite of their efforts, the ships of the enemy have been able to avoid
April 28th (search for this): article 1
[from the Mobile evening news, April 28th.]from New Orleans. The steamer C. W. Dorrence, Captain Hopkins, arrived this morning from the Ringlets, which she reached at 8 o'clock Saturday morning and left in the evening, putting into Pass Christian to avoid some of the enemy, who were in sight. She left Pass Christian at 10 o'clock last night. The latest news she brings is that telegraphed to us from the Bay of St. Louis. It was understood that the city would be occupied at 2 o'clock to-morrow. All the cotton was rolled into the public squares and burned, and the sugar and molasses on the levee rolled into the river. The dry docks, shipping of every description, and steamboats were burned, except some of these last, which took troops up the river to destroy the cotton on the bank. The gunboats, after making a single trip over the lake with soldiers, were burned. --Captain He is sure they could have been brought to Mobile. At the last intelligence fighting was st