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Hawesville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 6
Southern feeling in Kentucky. --The following, from the Louisville Journal, shows that Federal bayonets have not yet succeeded in crushing the Southern sentiment in all portions of "old Kentucky:" The ghost of rebellion in Hawesville, Hancock county, Ky., is not yet extinct. It was given out that the loyal men of the place would have a flag raising on Saturday, the 5th inst. The rebels thereabout, however, expressed a determination to prevent the movement, and threatened to visit thance if they attempted to carry out their design to hoist the old flag on their sacred soil of Hancock. The sanguinary threats of the were heard by the patriots of the royal districts, many of whom swung their old rifles across their shoulders and went up to the town, determined to be "in at the death," and to assist in the flag raising. The rebels saw that their loyal neighbors were in earnest, and no effort was made to interrupt their proceedings. The old flag now floats over Hawesville.
Southern feeling in Kentucky. --The following, from the Louisville Journal, shows that Federal bayonets have not yet succeeded in crushing the Southern sentiment in all portions of "old Kentucky:" The ghost of rebellion in Hawesville, Hancock county, Ky., is not yet extinct. It was given out that the loyal men of the place would have a flag raising on Saturday, the 5th inst. The rebels thereabout, however, expressed a determination to prevent the movement, and threatened to visit their loyal neighbors with terrible vengeance if they attempted to carry out their design to hoist the old flag on their sacred soil of Hancock. The sanguinary threats of the were heard by the patriots of the royal districts, many of whom swung their old rifles across their shoulders and went up to the town, determined to be "in at the death," and to assist in the flag raising. The rebels saw that their loyal neighbors were in earnest, and no effort was made to interrupt their proceedings. Th