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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: may 9, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 15 total hits in 7 results.

Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
The sick have been sent back, the various brigades assigned their positions, orders are flying "thick as leaves of Vallambrosa," and preparations are completed for giving a suitable reception to the foe. Memphis is in a state of panic. Every loyal man, who can do so consistently with his personal interests, is leaving the city and taking with him his goods and chattels. The enemy are expected within four or five days. Confederate money is useless, and being refused by scores. Many merchants have closed their stores rather than accept it in exchange for their goods. Tennessee money commands a premium of from fifteen to twenty per cent. Sugar has advanced two and a half per cent. This state of affairs is of course due solely to the fact that as soon as the Federals arrive, Southern funds will be comparatively valueless, while State bills will pass here, as at Nashville, with the same facility as United States Treasury notes. I leave for Corinth at once. Quel Qu'un.
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
ge and helpless youth. Your facilities for obtaining news at Richmond are doubtless greater than here, and it is therefore needless for me to anticipate what may already have been published in your enterprising columns. Intelligence from Fort Pillow is unimportant, because unvarying from what I have previously sent you. We still "hold our own," notwithstanding a concentrated fire from seven mortar boats, which continues unremittingly night and day. Originally the enemy had ten boats, but ars. In addition to these there are seven gunboats, but the majority of the transports have disappeared, the troops being needed to reinforce their army at Pittsburg. You need not be surprised to hear of startling events from the vicinity of Fort Pillow at any hour Jeff. Thompson is "around;" Com. Montgomery is wide awake, and the spirit of resistance is fairly at work. I regret to say, however, that from the beginning there has been a feeling of jealousy between the regular navy, under Com
Montgomery (search for this): article 1
nues unremittingly night and day. Originally the enemy had ten boats, but it is believed from several circumstances that three of these have been placed hors de combat by the bursting of the mortars. In addition to these there are seven gunboats, but the majority of the transports have disappeared, the troops being needed to reinforce their army at Pittsburg. You need not be surprised to hear of startling events from the vicinity of Fort Pillow at any hour Jeff. Thompson is "around;" Com. Montgomery is wide awake, and the spirit of resistance is fairly at work. I regret to say, however, that from the beginning there has been a feeling of jealousy between the regular navy, under Com. Hollins, and the Mississippi flotilla. The latter utterly refuses to co-operate with the indomitable Mississippi Captain, and it is said has thrown obstacles in the way of important events, which could easily have been accomplished. Much prejudice exists in Memphis against Hollins, where the facts ar
Beauregard (search for this): article 1
ys, he has been ordered to give reasons for his operations. I know nothing personally of the officer, and only chronicle these facts as a faithful and impartial observer of passing events. Affairs at Corinth are rapidly approaching a crisis. The Federal outposts have penetrated to within five miles of the place and a battle is imminent. Before this reaches you, the clash of arms may have sounded through the marshalled hosts, and the fate of one or both of the armies be determined. Beauregard has left nothing undone, and we are in prime fighting order. The sick have been sent back, the various brigades assigned their positions, orders are flying "thick as leaves of Vallambrosa," and preparations are completed for giving a suitable reception to the foe. Memphis is in a state of panic. Every loyal man, who can do so consistently with his personal interests, is leaving the city and taking with him his goods and chattels. The enemy are expected within four or five days. Co
Jefferson Thompson (search for this): article 1
even mortar boats, which continues unremittingly night and day. Originally the enemy had ten boats, but it is believed from several circumstances that three of these have been placed hors de combat by the bursting of the mortars. In addition to these there are seven gunboats, but the majority of the transports have disappeared, the troops being needed to reinforce their army at Pittsburg. You need not be surprised to hear of startling events from the vicinity of Fort Pillow at any hour Jeff. Thompson is "around;" Com. Montgomery is wide awake, and the spirit of resistance is fairly at work. I regret to say, however, that from the beginning there has been a feeling of jealousy between the regular navy, under Com. Hollins, and the Mississippi flotilla. The latter utterly refuses to co-operate with the indomitable Mississippi Captain, and it is said has thrown obstacles in the way of important events, which could easily have been accomplished. Much prejudice exists in Memphis agains
low at any hour Jeff. Thompson is "around;" Com. Montgomery is wide awake, and the spirit of resistance is fairly at work. I regret to say, however, that from the beginning there has been a feeling of jealousy between the regular navy, under Com. Hollins, and the Mississippi flotilla. The latter utterly refuses to co-operate with the indomitable Mississippi Captain, and it is said has thrown obstacles in the way of important events, which could easily have been accomplished. Much prejudice exists in Memphis against Hollins, where the facts are fully known, and one hears nothing but vituperation when his name is spoken. I learn that he is now in Richmond, whither, as rumor says, he has been ordered to give reasons for his operations. I know nothing personally of the officer, and only chronicle these facts as a faithful and impartial observer of passing events. Affairs at Corinth are rapidly approaching a crisis. The Federal outposts have penetrated to within five miles of t
April 28th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
From the Southwest.[Special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Memphis, Tenn., April 28, 1862. The all-absorbing theme of conversation now is the threatened occupation of New Orleans by the enemy. As yet we have no authentic advices from there, upon which we can construct a historic narrative of events; but enough is known to satisfy us that the great metropolis of the South has nobly done her duty. Thirteen gunboats are at her door, and backed by their thunder, the Federal Commodore has made a demand for surrender, which the brave-hearted Mayor has refused. To use his own language, almost Roman in its simplicity, "As to hoisting any other flag than that of our adoption and allegiance, let me say to you, sir, that the man lives not in our midst whose hand and heart would not be palsied at the mere though of such an act; nor could I find in my entire constituency so wretched and desperate a renegade as would dares to profane with his hands the sacred emblem of our aspiration