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Cape Fear (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
they should be with apparently studied neglect by any of the Virginia press. Quakiest. To the Editors of the Dispatch: As one deeply interested in the defiance of Richmond. I would mention a circumstance which occurred on Cape Fear river some years ago which I have thought might possibly an idea with regard to the preservation of our Capital. A fire occurred at Wilmington, N. C., which ignited a large quantity of tar. This running down to Cape Fearafter and floating overCape Fearafter and floating over its surface, threatened to envelops every ship on it in flames. The of these vessels left the river hastily, avoid the imminent danger. Could not the rface of James river be thus covered with contents of thousands of barrels of tar, rude turpentine, and resin in a state of ignition, upon which might be thrown old boxes, barrels, lumber and shanties, pine faggots and such other combustibles as would make James river too hot to hold the Yankee ves either wooden or iron clad? A Subscri
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
a large quantity of tar. This running down to Cape Fearafter and floating over its surface, threatened to envelops every ship on it in flames. The of these vessels left the river hastily, avoid the imminent danger. Could not the rface of James river be thus covered with contents of thousands of barrels of tar, rude turpentine, and resin in a state of ignition, upon which might be thrown old boxes, barrels, lumber and shanties, pine faggots and such other combustibles as would make James rJames river too hot to hold the Yankee ves either wooden or iron clad? A Subscriber. The position of our country. Camp Mcintosh, North Carolina, May 14, 1862. To the Editors of the Dispatch: The heavy hand of misfortune has recently dealt us some severe blows, and have heard with deep mortification the fall of the Crescent City and the of our gunboats there, of the evacuation. Norfolk and the destruction of property And now we are assured that the Virginia, upon which
Americans (search for this): article 1
ents of peace happiness, and around every fireside hover the Genius of Liberty and spirit of Independence. But with faint-hearted we would have a and, in the first place, we would re ind them that no people ever yet enjoyed privileges of freemen without paying for them; and, secondly, that people who the dearest price for freedom prizes it most highly, and will cling to it most tena ously. Hence we incline to believe that this struggle is the last this Continent will witness of Americans struggling with selves. Now, there remains but one question to you faint hearted, desponding men of the South, and this question even you cannot all to answer, as the Hon-heard have done; Will you be freemen, or will you be slave?" question which our forefather answered-- the language of the forest-born. Demoaths--"Give me liberty, or give me death!" our Southern soldiery reiterate almost manimously to-day, and our Southern women laper at every breath. Then the little difference of
Correspondence. The Fifth North Carolina Regiment, Halifax, N. C., May 13th, 1862."> Editors of the Dispatch: We have evidence here that the 5th Regiment North Carolina State troops behaved most gallantly and suffered severely in the battle of Williamsburg, on the 6th inst. We now indeed, that Lieut Snow, of Captain company, a now lamented citizen of county, was killed in the action, and we are heard that several other friends shared the same fate; and yet the Richmond papers have not taken the slightest notice of the regiment in connection with the fight. We cannot but feel hurt at this neglect; it is, at last, due to the relations of the soldiers who here that the list of casualties should be published. We have full confidence in our troops. They are as gallant a body of men as ever trod the . In keeping with the character of our people, they do not seek notoriety, nor they retain camp followers to blazon their but this is no reason why they should be
Correspondence. The Fifth North Carolina Regiment, Halifax, N. C., May 13th, 1862."> Editors of the Dispatch: We have evidence here that the 5th Regiment North Carolina State troops behaved most gallantly and suffered severely in the battle of Williamsburg, on the 6th inst. We now indeed, that Lieut Snow, of Captain company, a now lamented citizen of county, was killed in the action, and we are heard that several other friends shared the same fate; and yet the Richmond papers have not taken the slightest notice of the regiment in connection with the fight. We cannot but feel hurt at this neglect; it is, at last, due to the relations of the soldiers who here that the list of casualties should be published. We have full confidence in our troops. They are as gallant a body of men as ever trod the . In keeping with the character of our people, they do not seek notoriety, nor they retain camp followers to blazon their but this is no reason why they should be
May 14th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
e vessels left the river hastily, avoid the imminent danger. Could not the rface of James river be thus covered with contents of thousands of barrels of tar, rude turpentine, and resin in a state of ignition, upon which might be thrown old boxes, barrels, lumber and shanties, pine faggots and such other combustibles as would make James river too hot to hold the Yankee ves either wooden or iron clad? A Subscriber. The position of our country. Camp Mcintosh, North Carolina, May 14, 1862. To the Editors of the Dispatch: The heavy hand of misfortune has recently dealt us some severe blows, and have heard with deep mortification the fall of the Crescent City and the of our gunboats there, of the evacuation. Norfolk and the destruction of property And now we are assured that the Virginia, upon which we had learned almost to and to which we had looked as a barrier which the Federals might attempt in vain to in order to secure Richmond, has been to the fl
May 13th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
Correspondence. The Fifth North Carolina Regiment, Halifax, N. C., May 13th, 1862."> Editors of the Dispatch: We have evidence here that the 5th Regiment North Carolina State troops behaved most gallantly and suffered severely in the battle of Williamsburg, on the 6th inst. We now indeed, that Lieut Snow, of Captain company, a now lamented citizen of county, was killed in the action, and we are heard that several other friends shared the same fate; and yet the Richmond papers have not taken the slightest notice of the regiment in connection with the fight. We cannot but feel hurt at this neglect; it is, at last, due to the relations of the soldiers who here that the list of casualties should be published. We have full confidence in our troops. They are as gallant a body of men as ever trod the . In keeping with the character of our people, they do not seek notoriety, nor they retain camp followers to blazon their but this is no reason why they should be