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Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 3
ifficulty of obtaining supplies. On the morning of the 27th, the advance received marching orders, and on the afternoon of the same day the cavalry moved forward. The next day the infantry followed. Their destination was announced to be Little Rock, and they were to be followed by the outrage of the column. The distance from Pocahontas to Little Rock is one hundred and sixty miles, and the route a good one--it being what is called the military read. The Federal officers were confident Little Rock is one hundred and sixty miles, and the route a good one--it being what is called the military read. The Federal officers were confident of their ability to accomplish their object, and went so far as to assert that Phelps, of Missouri, would be appointed Military Governor of Arkansas. The army was supplying itself by a pillaging system of foregoing. The beacon and corn in the hands of the planters was seized, and receipts given for the number of pounds and bushels of each. These documents in every instance accompanied by the promise that the owners would be paid six cents a pound for the first, and thirty-five cents a b
Botetourt (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
iles into every porthole and at every pilot-house.--One pilot was ca killed, as he was seen to fail at the crack of a sharpshooters ride. Other of the invaders, it is thought, were sent to their final account. The high bluffs, thickly covered with undergrowth, afford admirable protection for sharpshooters and the number, we hear, is to be greatly increased. The casualties on our side were five killed and eight wounded. We have ascertained the following: Bowyer's battery, from Botetourt county, lost one man killed — George Clements — and three wounded. Jones's battery, Bedford county, two men killed. Sales' (Bedford) Battery, two men killed.--Captain Sales was slightly wounded in the arm. Our informant saw a mule which was dreadfully mangled and killed, more than a quarter of a mile from the Fort, by the explosion of a shell. The animal had three legs cut off, and its side was torn out. It the opinion of several who were present at the bombardment, that
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 3
ng orders, and on the afternoon of the same day the cavalry moved forward. The next day the infantry followed. Their destination was announced to be Little Rock, and they were to be followed by the outrage of the column. The distance from Pocahontas to Little Rock is one hundred and sixty miles, and the route a good one--it being what is called the military read. The Federal officers were confident of their ability to accomplish their object, and went so far as to assert that Phelps, of Missouri, would be appointed Military Governor of Arkansas. The army was supplying itself by a pillaging system of foregoing. The beacon and corn in the hands of the planters was seized, and receipts given for the number of pounds and bushels of each. These documents in every instance accompanied by the promise that the owners would be paid six cents a pound for the first, and thirty-five cents a bushel for the latter, at the expiration of one year, on condition they took the oath of allegia
Stamford, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 3
d detachments of the enemy as to finally drive him back. --Should it not be done? The late Dr. Bangs. A recent letter from New York says: The death of the aged and well-known Dr. Bangs took place on Saturday morning. He has been in falling health for some time past, and the event, therefore, was not unexpected. For sixty years Dr. Bangs was identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was born May 2, 1778, at Stratford, Conn, and at the age of thirteen removed to Stamford, Delaware. At twenty one he removed to Upper Canada, where he was employed for three years as a surveyor and teacher. In 1800 he became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1801 he entered the ministry, and in 1810, he was first appointed in this city, then one circuit, with five preaching places; and with the exception of one year, when he was President of the Wesleyan University, the last forty five years of his life were spent in New York and Brooklyn. Dr. Bangs was one of the o
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 3
aning under the oppression of the enemy. Is there no one to head such an expedition? If the Government will not or cannot spare Confederate troops for such an enterprise, we believe volunteers sufficient for the expedition could soon be raised if a leader in whom they had confidence would offer himself to lead them. Who will immortalize himself by retaking Nashville? The Yankees find out the spirit of the Southern people. A letter from General Mitchell's (Federal) Division, at Huntsville, Ala, to the Cincinnati Times, says: The white inhabitants of this part of the country are the most rampant and vicious Secessionists I over met with. They will hardly speak to an officer when they meet him, but look side ways, lest they might inhale his "Yankee" breath. No matter what the nation, creed, or color of a man, of he is for the Union he is a Yankee. The ladies — save the mark — are more vicious, fierce, and rampant than the men. An instance: A few days ago, Major M
Columbia, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 3
the Tenth Ohio, seeing two women, whom he supposed to be ladies enter a carriage, and finding it difficult to close stepped gallantly forward for the purpose of closing the door, when one of the termagants put forth her hand and pushed the door most violently.--The Major looked create fallen for a moment, and after a pause said, "Excuse me, I thought you were ladies" This brought the crimson to the checks of the she devil, but she said nothing. Another correspondent, writing from Columbia, Tenn., says: This place is rotten, rancid with treason. I am told it is regarded as the staunchest secesh population in the State. Very likely. It is quieter than Nashville; not so insolent or so candid. But its still waters are running mighty deep. Last night a clever subterranean scheme was squelched by our vigilant provost. He said to me at dark, "Their very stillness bat lays them. I'll block a tall game to-night." And he did. Certain gentlemen in jeans are evidently playing
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): article 3
into consideration and provide against it. It is no time for "talk"-- it is time for work, and the work is ready and waiting for the hands of men to do. Norman doubts that, by every consideration of patriotism and manhood, and of public and private duty, we ought to defend the city. Some seem to think that because New Orleans fell, Mobile must also fall. It does not follow, after Forts Jackson and Philip were passed, New Orleans was at the mercy of the naval power of the enemy. The Mississippi river, deep and wide enough to float the navies of the world, washes the levee at New Orleans. Not so here. The bars and flats below Mobile are admirably adopted to defence against maritime attack. Even if he passes Forts Morgan and Gaines the enemy has still to encounter our best defences. With all the passes clear, it is only his light boats that can come up; with these passes closed he cannot reach the city with his f ting batteries. If he comes by land we know how to meet him. An in
France (France) (search for this): article 3
denies it. Under this state of facts, says the French Emperor, let each State represented in the Confederacy decide for itself, freely and without compulsion, with which nation it will cast its lot for the future. So far as at present advised, the overture for peace will probably fall. Our Government is ready to agree to the mode of settlement, but it is understood that the Lincoln Administration declines intervention on the terms specified. Mercier's dispatch was forwarded immediately to France by a steamer in waiting, and it is not improbable that Napoleon will take some decided step with regard to the war as soon as the result shall have reached him. Important movement in Arkansas. The Memphis Appeal, of the 7th inst., says: From a gentleman who left Pocahontas on Wednesday evening last, we have intelligence of the movement of the enemy in that section of Arkansas, of a rather startling character. On the 21st uit., the advance of Gen. Steele's division, under com
Chesterfield (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
The War. There was a general failure of the mails on Friday and Saturday, and we consequently received but few of our Southern exchanges. From the means at hand, we compile the following summary, which will be found interesting: The gunboat fight at Drury's Bluff. The Petersburg Express, of Friday, has some further particular of the fight at Drury's Bluff, which we copy: The fight at Fort Drury yesterday on James river, (Chesterfield side) was quite an exciting affair, and we have good grounds for believing resulted in a decided repulse to the Lincoln gunboats. A gentleman who was present in forms us that the approach of the Federals was first discovered by our pickets about daylight. The fighting was commenced at half-past 7, and continued without intermission until eleven, when the gunboats, entirely satisfied retired rapidly down the river. The Galena, an iron clad, but not so formidable as the Monitor, was the only vessel engaged, although the Monitor and three
Stratford, Westmoreland co., Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
small force might prevent this, and so harass the scattered detachments of the enemy as to finally drive him back. --Should it not be done? The late Dr. Bangs. A recent letter from New York says: The death of the aged and well-known Dr. Bangs took place on Saturday morning. He has been in falling health for some time past, and the event, therefore, was not unexpected. For sixty years Dr. Bangs was identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was born May 2, 1778, at Stratford, Conn, and at the age of thirteen removed to Stamford, Delaware. At twenty one he removed to Upper Canada, where he was employed for three years as a surveyor and teacher. In 1800 he became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1801 he entered the ministry, and in 1810, he was first appointed in this city, then one circuit, with five preaching places; and with the exception of one year, when he was President of the Wesleyan University, the last forty five years of his life were
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