hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Johnson 29 3 Browse Search
W. C. Scott 26 0 Browse Search
Gens Jackson 14 0 Browse Search
McClellan 13 1 Browse Search
Connor 13 1 Browse Search
Beauregard 11 7 Browse Search
Wingfield Scott 10 0 Browse Search
Morgan 10 0 Browse Search
Craney Island (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
William C. Scott 10 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: may 20, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 113 total hits in 41 results.

1 2 3 4 5
Monterey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ascended to its summit, when Ashby's scouts reported that the Yankees had placed four pieces of artillery on the road leading into McDowell, on the west side of the mountain, where the road passes through a narrow gorge. The heights commanding Monterey were also in possession of the enemy, with artillery planted. The Lee Battery, of Lynchburg, was selected to go in advance with its rifle guns, but after reaching the summit of the mountain they were ordered back — Gens Jackson and Johnson dsition for artillery. This morning our scouts are out in search of a position and to watch the movements of the Yankees, but I have not yet heard from them. Northwestern Virginia is now nearly free of the scoundrels. I do not knew our destination, as General Jackson never tells any one his plans, not even his Brigadiers and Aids. The Yankees had put up a telegraph wire almost to Monterey, but on our approach abandoned the work, leaving several tons of wire, ladders, &c., behind.
Shenandoah Peak (Nevada, United States) (search for this): article 1
here; to fore to give you an account of that battle. For the space of ground fought over, it was one of the fiercest and bloodiest it that has occurred during the present war. Generals Jackson and Johnson having driven the enemy from Shenandoah mountain in great precipitation, they relied on the main body of their forces at McDowell, where they made a stand. That village is very strongly situated for defence from an attack from the East--there being a very narrow gorge between the mountawounding several, and taking one prisoner. About this time "Old Stonewall" passed up the road and had a conversation with General Johnson. Soon after the consultation, Johnson's army pushed up the road in pursuit of the enemy towards Shenandoah Mountain, followed by Jackson's. When we arrived at the foot of the mountain, on the east side, we found a regiment of Yankees has been camped there but had left on hearing of our appearance, leaving behind all their tents, clothing, commissary sto
Highland County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
d saw the marks of the enemy's balls, and it is my opinion, and the opinion of nearly all with us , that no one could have stood on any one place during the whole battle, near Col.Scott's right wing, without being hit. The artillery on our side was not in action. Virginian. another account. A correspondent of the Lynchburg Republican, writing from the camp in Pendleton county, Virginia, May 12th, gives the following interesting particulars of the recent fight at McDowell's in Highland; On Monday, May 5th, we left camp at Valley Mills, Augusta county, six miles north of Staunton, with five day's rations, without tents and baggage, save blankets, under the command of Gen. Ed. Johnson, and the next day the advance guard, under Col. Letcher fell in with the outposts of the enemy--one cavalry company and a body of infantry — near the forks of the Jennings's Gap and the Parkersburg turnpike roads, 21 miles from Staunton. Letcher fired upon the enemy, killing three, woun
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
happy to state that the wound, though quite painful, is not of a serious character. The 12th Georgia regiment did most of the fighting, and suffered very severely. They lost 182 killed, wounded and missing; among them were many brave and gallant officers. One company of the 12th Georgia lost all of its officers save the 4th Corporal. There were only two brigades of three regiments each both of Johnson's army, engaged int the fight. The first was commanded by Col. Z. T. Conner, of Georgia, and the second by Col. Wm. C. Scott, of Virginia, of both of whom Gen. Johnson speaks in the highest terms for their gallantry and bravery on this occasion. We expected to renew the fight the next morning, but the bird had flown, leaving behind, at McDowell, where 3,000 encamped, all his camp equipage, a large quantity of ammunition, a number of cases of Enfield rifles, together with about 100 head of cattle, which they had stolen, being mostly milch cows. At McDowell, Milroy's h
Bull Pasture Mountain (Utah, United States) (search for this): article 1
scouting the mountain thoroughly, we found that three regiments had been camped upon the top, but upon our approach had made a hasty retreat. When we arrived upon the summit we could see the enemy in hasty retreat on the east side of Bull Pasture Mountain, about five miles in advance, It being late in the day our commander thought it prudent to half and go into camp for the night. At sunrise the next morning we were again on the line of march in pursuit of the enemy. When we arrived at Bull Pasture Mountain we ascended to its summit, when Ashby's scouts reported that the Yankees had placed four pieces of artillery on the road leading into McDowell, on the west side of the mountain, where the road passes through a narrow gorge. The heights commanding Monterey were also in possession of the enemy, with artillery planted. The Lee Battery, of Lynchburg, was selected to go in advance with its rifle guns, but after reaching the summit of the mountain they were ordered back
Valley Mills (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
inion, and the opinion of nearly all with us , that no one could have stood on any one place during the whole battle, near Col.Scott's right wing, without being hit. The artillery on our side was not in action. Virginian. another account. A correspondent of the Lynchburg Republican, writing from the camp in Pendleton county, Virginia, May 12th, gives the following interesting particulars of the recent fight at McDowell's in Highland; On Monday, May 5th, we left camp at Valley Mills, Augusta county, six miles north of Staunton, with five day's rations, without tents and baggage, save blankets, under the command of Gen. Ed. Johnson, and the next day the advance guard, under Col. Letcher fell in with the outposts of the enemy--one cavalry company and a body of infantry — near the forks of the Jennings's Gap and the Parkersburg turnpike roads, 21 miles from Staunton. Letcher fired upon the enemy, killing three, wounding several, and taking one prisoner. About thi
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 1
in with the outposts of the enemy--one cavalry company and a body of infantry — near the forks of the Jennings's Gap and the Parkersburg turnpike roads, 21 miles from Staunton. Letcher fired upon the enemy, killing three, wounding several, and taking one prisoner. About this time "Old Stonewall" passed up the road and had a conversation with General Johnson. Soon after the consultation, Johnson's army pushed up the road in pursuit of the enemy towards Shenandoah Mountain, followed by Jackson's. When we arrived at the foot of the mountain, on the east side, we found a regiment of Yankees has been camped there but had left on hearing of our appearance, leaving behind all their tents, clothing, commissary stores, and a number of small arms, most of which they broke the stocks off; but several cases were left unopened and in fine order. After scouting the mountain thoroughly, we found that three regiments had been camped upon the top, but upon our approach had made a hasty ret
Augusta county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
opinion of nearly all with us , that no one could have stood on any one place during the whole battle, near Col.Scott's right wing, without being hit. The artillery on our side was not in action. Virginian. another account. A correspondent of the Lynchburg Republican, writing from the camp in Pendleton county, Virginia, May 12th, gives the following interesting particulars of the recent fight at McDowell's in Highland; On Monday, May 5th, we left camp at Valley Mills, Augusta county, six miles north of Staunton, with five day's rations, without tents and baggage, save blankets, under the command of Gen. Ed. Johnson, and the next day the advance guard, under Col. Letcher fell in with the outposts of the enemy--one cavalry company and a body of infantry — near the forks of the Jennings's Gap and the Parkersburg turnpike roads, 21 miles from Staunton. Letcher fired upon the enemy, killing three, wounding several, and taking one prisoner. About this time "Old Sto
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
People along the road tell us that they pressed all their horses to carry off their artillery, &c. We arrived at this place yesterday (Sunday) about 3 o'clock P. M., On our approach the enemy took to the mountains, where they had planted artillery, and set fire to all the works. So dense was the smoke that we could not find their position until nightfall, when it was too dark to shell them. In fact, it is very hard to drive an enemy from the mountain heights, as you can seldom get a position for artillery. This morning our scouts are out in search of a position and to watch the movements of the Yankees, but I have not yet heard from them. Northwestern Virginia is now nearly free of the scoundrels. I do not knew our destination, as General Jackson never tells any one his plans, not even his Brigadiers and Aids. The Yankees had put up a telegraph wire almost to Monterey, but on our approach abandoned the work, leaving several tons of wire, ladders, &c., behind.
Pendleton (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
hurt. No one in the battle distinguished himself more. I visited the field of battle again yesterday, and saw the marks of the enemy's balls, and it is my opinion, and the opinion of nearly all with us , that no one could have stood on any one place during the whole battle, near Col.Scott's right wing, without being hit. The artillery on our side was not in action. Virginian. another account. A correspondent of the Lynchburg Republican, writing from the camp in Pendleton county, Virginia, May 12th, gives the following interesting particulars of the recent fight at McDowell's in Highland; On Monday, May 5th, we left camp at Valley Mills, Augusta county, six miles north of Staunton, with five day's rations, without tents and baggage, save blankets, under the command of Gen. Ed. Johnson, and the next day the advance guard, under Col. Letcher fell in with the outposts of the enemy--one cavalry company and a body of infantry — near the forks of the Jennings's Gap
1 2 3 4 5