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New England (United States) (search for this): article 26
ities. Indeed, it can be regarded in no other light than as being eminently wise. Should it only contest the enemy's control of the Mississippi river for sixty days and prevent a union of the Federal columns now at New Orleans and New Madrid that length of time, it will do much good. By the time Butler and his forces have been in the "land of cotton," particularly within the vicinity of New Orleans, a couple of months they will commence to experience the "heated term" so dreaded by the New England Yankee. The deadly fevers, superinduced by malaria and climate cause will assault them with an earnest vigor little anticipated. The battle of Farmington. The army correspondent of the Savannah Republican, writing from Corinth, May 10, gives an account of the fight at Farmington the day previous, a portion of which we copy: The enemy had been parading up and down on our right for several days, and seemed to be really anxious to cross swords with us indeed, he had become so
United States (United States) (search for this): article 26
p to noon Tuesday Baton Rouge had not been occupied, nor had the Federal flag been hoisted on the Capitol, notwithstanding the averment of all the "reliable" in the city. The battle of Armageddon. The war correspondent of the Mobile Register writing in reference to disaffection among the Kentuckians and Tennessean at Nashville, says: The discontent among the Kentuckians was increased by a sermon preached in Nashville by the Rev, Mr. Baldwin, the author of "Armageddon, or the United States in Prophecy." You may remember the work, and that the author's study of the Prophecies led him to the conclusion that the great battle of "Armageddon," spoken of in Revelations, would be fought about this time in the Valley of the Mississippi. He referred to the same subject in his sermon in Nashville, and told his hearers that the battle would take place by the 20th of June--that the Federal host would be overthrown and dispersed — and that their dead carcasses would make "all the lan
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 26
ail.--There are thirteen of them, two of whom are represented as desperate characters. They will be sent to Richmond. Operations on James river. The Petersburg Express, of yesterday, says: The Monitor, at last accounts, was off City Point, near the month of the Appomattox river — a position which also commands the channel of the James. Three of the gunboat have proceeded down the river, whether to return with large accessions or repair to some other section, remains to be seen.aturday, relative to Petersburg. Some re(lie)able person appeared in the streets of the former city, almost out of breath and scarcely able to articulate for the time; yet managed to gain forth to his hearers, that 20,000 Yankees had landed at City Point, and marched straight ahead and captured our beautiful city. The re(lie)able person had no time to wait for the departing trains, but started at a rapid doubt quick on the railroad and arrived in Richmond ahead of all the engines and telegraph
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 26
danger that could not have been surpassed by Southern troops. The citizens were entirely defenseless, and there were no soldiers to "molest them or make them afraid. " Had there been a parties leader, with the spirit of a Marion, anywhere about, the Dismal Swamp would have been ambushed, and not a Yankee horseman would have returned to Norfolk to tell the fate of the fellows. One cavalry company could have bagged the whole party without difficulty. The bare mention of Col. Wright's Take Georgia regiment, by a shrewd negro boy whom they attempted to catechize, cause a rush to the saddle and a stampede towards Portsmouth which was ludicrous in the extreme. On Wednesday, only eight of the invaders returned to Suffolk, demanded the keys of the jail, released every prisoner, quartered their liberated felons and themselves on a respectable citizen, impressed the wagon of another to drag their filthy persons to Portsmouth, and then left at leisure. The enemy in Arkansas. The
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 26
, impressed the wagon of another to drag their filthy persons to Portsmouth, and then left at leisure. The enemy in Arkansas. The Memphis Avalanche, of the 10th inst., has the following editorial news relative to the movements of the enemy in Arkansas: A gentleman just from Newtown, Arkansas, states that the Federals had about 4,000 troops at Pocahontas, and about 5,000 more under General Curtis, were daily expected. The Federals were overrunning Arkansas, and it was reported thatArkansas, and it was reported that large bodies were moving on Little Rock and Jacksonport — They had not reached the latter place 1st Saturday. The Federals approaching, Little Rock are said to be accompanied by Lane, of Kansas, whom they design to make Governor of Arkansas, in Arkansas, in place of Governor Rector. The Federals at Pocahontas had taken possession of the Gazette and Herold office, and from it were issuing a paper devoted to local matters and the affair of the Federal troops. The editor of the Pocahontas. Herold and
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 26
rom Newtown, Arkansas, states that the Federals had about 4,000 troops at Pocahontas, and about 5,000 more under General Curtis, were daily expected. The Federals were overrunning Arkansas, and it was reported that large bodies were moving on Little Rock and Jacksonport — They had not reached the latter place 1st Saturday. The Federals approaching, Little Rock are said to be accompanied by Lane, of Kansas, whom they design to make Governor of Arkansas, in place of Governor Rector. The hey had not reached the latter place 1st Saturday. The Federals approaching, Little Rock are said to be accompanied by Lane, of Kansas, whom they design to make Governor of Arkansas, in place of Governor Rector. The Federals at Pocahontas had taken possession of the Gazette and Herold office, and from it were issuing a paper devoted to local matters and the affair of the Federal troops. The editor of the Pocahontas. Herold and Gazette Capt. Martin, is raising a guerrillas brigade.
Elkhorn, Walworth County, Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): article 26
fired in succession by the Confederates about 9 o'clock the night before, which seem to have produced a moving effect upon the Federals, who construed them into a signal of some sort, and, accordingly. they fell back some distance during the night. This rendered it necessary for us to march that much farther before we came up to them. And thus the enemy escaped. Gen. Ruggles opened the attack, and Van Dorn and Price soon took up the tale. The army of the West, led by the heroes of Elkhorn, were principally engaged. The enemy ran so fast that Gen. Ruggles's division, after a few discharges, were unable to get within range of his flying columns. Indeed, it was a running fight from the moment the Federals learned we had attacked them in force. Possibly Gen. Pope had orders to retire in the event he was attacked, since one can hardly conceive how 20,000 fresh troops in position could fail to offer a stubborn resistance to even twice their own numbers.--And yet the wild confus
Tybee Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 26
stop him, but the soldiers, who were deeply interested, would not allow it to be done. Defences of the Mississippi river. A late number of the Memphis Appeal says: Our "inland sea"--the great Mississippi —— has not yet been surrendered to the control of the enemy. Still more vigorous efforts, it seems, are to be made to repel his fleets, both from below and above, through the old instrumentality of land fortifications and heavy ordnance. The fall of Forts Henry, Donelson, Pulaski, Macon, Jackson, and St. Philip, of New Madrid and Island No.10, do not furnish a moral to our authorities sufficiently pointed to deter them from this difficult enterprise. They are determined that the approach to Memphis, at least, if nothing more can be accomplished, shall not be quite so easy as the foe was led to believe upon hearing that New Orleans had fallen. Accordingly, the defences at Forts Pillow and Wright, and Vicksburg have been greatly strengthened, and nut in a condit
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 26
present to stop him, but the soldiers, who were deeply interested, would not allow it to be done. Defences of the Mississippi river. A late number of the Memphis Appeal says: Our "inland sea"--the great Mississippi —— has not yet been surrendered to the control of the enemy. Still more vigorous efforts, it seems, are to be made to repel his fleets, both from below and above, through the old instrumentality of land fortifications and heavy ordnance. The fall of Forts Henry, Donelson, Pulaski, Macon, Jackson, and St. Philip, of New Madrid and Island No.10, do not furnish a moral to our authorities sufficiently pointed to deter them from this difficult enterprise. They are determined that the approach to Memphis, at least, if nothing more can be accomplished, shall not be quite so easy as the foe was led to believe upon hearing that New Orleans had fallen. Accordingly, the defences at Forts Pillow and Wright, and Vicksburg have been greatly strengthened, and nut in
Buras (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 26
ho were deeply interested, would not allow it to be done. Defences of the Mississippi river. A late number of the Memphis Appeal says: Our "inland sea"--the great Mississippi —— has not yet been surrendered to the control of the enemy. Still more vigorous efforts, it seems, are to be made to repel his fleets, both from below and above, through the old instrumentality of land fortifications and heavy ordnance. The fall of Forts Henry, Donelson, Pulaski, Macon, Jackson, and St. Philip, of New Madrid and Island No.10, do not furnish a moral to our authorities sufficiently pointed to deter them from this difficult enterprise. They are determined that the approach to Memphis, at least, if nothing more can be accomplished, shall not be quite so easy as the foe was led to believe upon hearing that New Orleans had fallen. Accordingly, the defences at Forts Pillow and Wright, and Vicksburg have been greatly strengthened, and nut in a condition to delay the Federal flotil
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