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South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
eived him with acclamations as he rode into camp with him at their head they feared nothing, and joyfully entered on the race with their adversary. Skillful retreat through the Carolinas. Greens had ordered the main army to rendezvous at Guilford, and thither he now directed his steps, closely watched by Cornwallis. To understand the ground over which this remarkable retreat was performed, it is necessary only to glance at a map. Three large rivers rise in the northwest parts of South and North Carolina, and flow in a southeasterly direction into the Atlantic. The lower or more southern one is the Catawha, which empties into the Santes. The next, north of it, and nearly parallel, is the Yadkin, emptying into the Pedee. The last, and more northern, is the Dan, which soon leaves its southwesterly direction and winds backwards and forwards across the Virginia line, and finally falls into the Roanoke. Greene was now on the Catawha, or must southern river, and directed his
Cowpens (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
go to make up the little comforts of a camp committed to the flames.--Cornwallis set the example, and, beginning with his own baggage, the destruction continued till it reached the last private. It took two days to complete it; and then, stripped like a wrestler for the struggle, the British General moved forward. But Greene. with only a single aid, and a sergeant's guard of dragoons, had left the main army, and pressed forward a hundred and fifty miles to succor Morgan. The victors of Cowpens received him with acclamations as he rode into camp with him at their head they feared nothing, and joyfully entered on the race with their adversary. Skillful retreat through the Carolinas. Greens had ordered the main army to rendezvous at Guilford, and thither he now directed his steps, closely watched by Cornwallis. To understand the ground over which this remarkable retreat was performed, it is necessary only to glance at a map. Three large rivers rise in the northwest part
Guilford, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): article 1
with their adversary. Skillful retreat through the Carolinas. Greens had ordered the main army to rendezvous at Guilford, and thither he now directed his steps, closely watched by Cornwallis. To understand the ground over which this remver, he crossed over, and started anew after his adversary. But the latter, ever vigilant, was already on his march for Guilford, where he resolved to make a stand, and strike this bold Briton to the heart. But on reaching Guilford, he learned, to Guilford, he learned, to his dismay, that the reinforcements promised him had not arrived.--The English army was nearly double that of his own, and all well tried, disciplined soldiers; and he knew it would be madness to give battle on such disadvantageous terms.--There was,, no remedy but to retreat, and this had now become a difficult matter. In the hope of being able to sustain himself at Guilford, he had suffered his enemy to approach so near, and block him in so effectually, that there was but one possible way of
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
acclamations as he rode into camp with him at their head they feared nothing, and joyfully entered on the race with their adversary. Skillful retreat through the Carolinas. Greens had ordered the main army to rendezvous at Guilford, and thither he now directed his steps, closely watched by Cornwallis. To understand the ground over which this remarkable retreat was performed, it is necessary only to glance at a map. Three large rivers rise in the northwest parts of South and North Carolina, and flow in a southeasterly direction into the Atlantic. The lower or more southern one is the Catawha, which empties into the Santes. The next, north of it, and nearly parallel, is the Yadkin, emptying into the Pedee. The last, and more northern, is the Dan, which soon leaves its southwesterly direction and winds backwards and forwards across the Virginia line, and finally falls into the Roanoke. Greene was now on the Catawha, or must southern river, and directed his steps north, h
Broad River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
through the Carolinas. [From "Washington and His Generals."] But Cornwallis at length saw the error he had been led into, and immediately concentrating his troops, moved forward upon Morgan. Tarleton, with eleven hundred men, was ordered to meet him in front, while he himself, with the main part of the army, would out off his retreat. Morgan, with less than a thousand men, immediately began to retire; but Tarleton, with his accustomed vigor, pressed him so hard that when he came to Broad River he dared not attempt the passage, and so resolved to make a desperate stand where he was. Out of the eleven hundred men Tarleton led into the battle of Cowpens, he saved but four hundred. Two cannon, eight hundred muskets, a hundred dragoon-horses, and tents and ammunition, were the fruits of this victory. Scarcely had the roar of battle ceased before Morgan began to retreat. He knew Cornwallis, with a powerful army, was close upon him, and an hour's delay might lose him all th
Dan River (United States) (search for this): article 1
ood, were now stretching forward through the midnight, miles in advance.--Cornwallis, when he arrived at the smouldering camp-fires, believed himself almost up with Greene, and allowing his troops but a few moments' repose, marched all night long. In the morning his van was close upon the rear of that firm guard. Now came the last prodigious effort of the British commander — that rear-guard must fall, and with it, Greene, or all has labor and sacrifice would be in vain. On the banks of the Dan he had resolved to bury the American army, and if human effort and human energy could effect it, it should be done. His steady columns closed more threateningly and rapidly on the guard; pushing it fiercely before them, and scorning all meaner success, pressed forward for the greater prize. Still Lee's intrepid legion, and Washington's fearless horsemen, hung black and wrathful around their path, striving desperately, but in vain, to check their rapid advance. On, on, like racers approachi
Americans (search for this): article 1
and marched boldly against the entire English army.--The British commander, thinking it to be the advance guard of the Americans, began hastily to contract his lines, and make preparations for a fierce resistance. This detained his march, and allowed Greene to get a start, without which he must inevitably have been lost. The English were without baggage; indeed, the whole army had been converted into light infantry, which enabled it to move with much more alacrity than that of the Americans. It was now the dead of winter — the roads to-day were filled deep with mud, and to-morrow frozen hard, presenting a mass of rugged points to the soldiers' feet, through which or over which they were compelled to drag themselves, urged on by the fear of destruction. In the meantime Cornwallis, apprised of his error, began the pursuit in good earnest. But that gallant rear guard of Williams kept between the two armies, slowly retreating, but still present — ever bending like a bow of wrat
ington and His Generals."] But Cornwallis at length saw the error he had been led into, and immediately concentrating his troops, moved forward upon Morgan. Tarleton, with eleven hundred men, was ordered to meet him in front, while he himself, with the main part of the army, would out off his retreat. Morgan, with less than a thousand men, immediately began to retire; but Tarleton, with his accustomed vigor, pressed him so hard that when he came to Broad River he dared not attempt the passage, and so resolved to make a desperate stand where he was. Out of the eleven hundred men Tarleton led into the battle of Cowpens, he saved but four hundred. Tarleton led into the battle of Cowpens, he saved but four hundred. Two cannon, eight hundred muskets, a hundred dragoon-horses, and tents and ammunition, were the fruits of this victory. Scarcely had the roar of battle ceased before Morgan began to retreat. He knew Cornwallis, with a powerful army, was close upon him, and an hour's delay might lose him all the fruits of his gallant achievem
ith the reinforcements he expected from Virginia. Discovering at once the error under which Cornwallis labored, he added to it by sending a large detachment to manœuvre in front, as if the upper fords were indeed the object of his efforts. Colonel Williams commanded this chosen body of men, and marched boldly against the entire English army.--The British commander, thinking it to be the advance guard of the Americans, began hastily to contract his lines, and make preparations for a fierce resio the soldiers' feet, through which or over which they were compelled to drag themselves, urged on by the fear of destruction. In the meantime Cornwallis, apprised of his error, began the pursuit in good earnest. But that gallant rear guard of Williams kept between the two armies, slowly retreating, but still present — ever bending like a bow of wrath on the advancing enemy. The fate of the American army rested on its firmness and skill, and every officer in it seemed to feel the immense trus
uggle, the British General moved forward. But Greene. with only a single aid, and a sergeant's guania line, and finally falls into the Roanoke. Greene was now on the Catawha, or must southern rivero keep a deep stream dividing him and his roe. Greene was now across the Catawha, which, swollen by antagonist, and cross without opposition. But Greene had been on the alert, and stationed a body of cabin, just showing its roof above the rocks, Greene took up his quarters, and while his troops weristance. This detained his march, and allowed Greene to get a start, without which he must inevitabng camp-fires, believed himself almost up with Greene, and allowing his troops but a few moments' reing in a swift gallop, up the road along which Greene had lately passed. Every eye watched him as hshores echo. But it was with sterner pleasure Greene contemplated his escape; and as he looked on t feats of ancient or modern times. It covered Greene with more glory than a victory could have done[7 more...]
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