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Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
buted to the zeal and energy of Col. Rufus Ingalie, the Chief Quartermaster at this post, which provoke on lies in his department, and the manner to which he has discharged them, has won for him a high reputation as an executive officer of rare ability. The first train of this with supplies for our army will leave here to-day for An overseer of a form belonging to a Maiden lady came into camp station yesterday, frightened at the threats of his negroes to take his teams and go to Fortress Monroe, to get their papers, as they said. He professed to be a good Union man, and evaded impressment into the rebel service by means of a sprained ankle. He wanted this affair settled because the war had raised the price of coffee to a dollar, sugar to fifty cents, and bacon to seventy-five cents a pound. He said he had told the Secessionists that the Yankees were not fighting for niggers, and that they (the and drought on the war by the flag." He desired very much that a guard should b
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
leans there is "an end to the blockade of that city." Only one thing was wanting, in his opinion, and that was that "cotton should come down" to New Orleans. Should the rebels destroy the stock, he adds, "it is hard to see what is gained by the capture." The London Post and Herald--the organs of the Cabinet and extreme aristocrats — were inclined to underrate the value of the achievement, so far as commercial benefits to Europe were to be expected from it. The impression in Manchester, at the latest moment, was to the effect that the fall of New Orleans would bring forward more cotton. The Opinion Nationals of Paris--Prince Napoleon's organ — says that M Mercier's visit visit to Richmond had reference merely to a French tobacco stock. The affair was still, however, the cause of much political speculation in Paris. Count de Persigny had, it was said, been suddenly ordered from Paris to London, his mission having reference to the cargo of cotton and naval store
Queenstown, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
he Chickahominy river, where it was supposed the enemy would make a stand, was passed by our forces without molestation.--The enemy were evidently afraid of a flank movement. Whiskey rations are now served out to the soldiers morning and evening, to counteract the influences of the malaria. Foreign news. The European news by the Kangaroo and Hibernian, telegraphed from Cape Race, is dated to the 16th of May--five days later than our advices by the Scouts. The Canada, at Queenstown and Liverpool; had reported the New Orleans by the Union army, and, her news being subsequently confirmed, the event was very widely commented on by the London journals. The fact produced no influence on the Liverpool cotton market at first, but American descriptions of the staple experienced a decline at the latest date of the Kangaroo. It is acknowledged by the London Times that the taking of New Orleans is a great triumph for the North. That paper says that the United States Min
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
s not very considerable. The fight took place in a swamp, our men fighting to great disadvantage, owing to this fact. This place has been metamorphosed into a locality of least temporary importance. Hereafter it will receive historic importance and dignity, from being the grand depot of supplies of the Union army in its advance to the capital of rebeldom. The Pamankey river, which flows by this place, is a stream of more importance than heretofore accorded to it. From its mouth, at West Point, the head of the York raver, to this place, a distance of over fifty miles, it runs through a picturesque country of a genial climate. It however, appears crude to the Northern eye, as the river banks are devoid of villages and country villas, which the agricultural resources of this section demand and warrant, and which would have been reared ere this had the land been in the possession of men imbued with a moiety of our Yankee enterprise. The river itself is somewhat sinuous, and at pl
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
, at Queenstown and Liverpool; had reported the New Orleans by the Union army, and, her news being subsequently confirmed, the event was very widely commented on by the London journals. The fact produced no influence on the Liverpool cotton market at first, but American descriptions of the staple experienced a decline at the latest date of the Kangaroo. It is acknowledged by the London Times that the taking of New Orleans is a great triumph for the North. That paper says that the United States Ministers in London and Paris had been "told to assure the Governments that plans are being matured for a mitigation of the blockade." The writer entertains no doubt of the sincerity of the intention of the Federal Cabinet in this direction, and states that with the fall of New Orleans there is "an end to the blockade of that city." Only one thing was wanting, in his opinion, and that was that "cotton should come down" to New Orleans. Should the rebels destroy the stock, he adds, "
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
ouring out their vials of wrath upon the head of Secretary Staunton. One of this class of journals, for instance, denounces his "management of the War Department" as "An intolerable nuisance which ought to be abated," while another describes the unfortunate Secretary "an official who possesses patriotism without discretion and enthusiasm without judgment, and who is as ready to exaggerate the terrors of his work to-day as he was to rush upon them yesterday. " But Mr. Senator Wilson, of Massachusetts, audacity saddles the whole responsibility in the premises upon the President, who has only to give his orders, and Secretaries and Generals are bound to obey. But let us go a little deeper into the merits of this master, and we will doubtless soon reach the true so of the mystery of this restless of General Banks from the Shenandoah Valley. The Secretary of War, we all know, is a lawyer and not a soldier, but granting that he "possesses patriotism without discretion and enthusias
Chickahominy (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
g. We make some extracts: White-House, Va., May 26, 1862. The great body of our army have safely, and, with but little opposition, crossed the Chickahominy river, and our advanced guard is within five miles of the city of Richmond. This fact dispels the heretofore prevalent idea that the enemy would make a bold defehe front I learn that the 4th Michigan regiment, while on a reconnaissance yesterday, encountered a large body of the rebels in a swamp a few miles from the Chickahominy river. An engagement took place, which resulted in the discomfiture and defeat of the rebels, a large number of whom were killed or wounded and taken prisoners. s reported the near approach of our forces. The announcement caused a stampede of the dinnerless party. A forward movement was made yesterday, and the Chickahominy river, where it was supposed the enemy would make a stand, was passed by our forces without molestation.--The enemy were evidently afraid of a flank movement.
M'Clellan (search for this): article 1
trigues to break up the army and the plans of Gen. McClellan, to stop recruiting for the army, when fifty thousand more men were needed to secure our conquests in Virginia, and a hundred thousand more to push the rebels speedily out of the State. Let the responsibility then rest where it belongs. We cannot consent that either the President or the Secretary of War shall be made the scapegoat for a disaster which properly belongs to the abolition negro brigade of Congress. Latest from M'Clellan's army. The Northern papers contain the usual quantity of letters from the Army of the Potomac. Some of them are amusing. We make some extracts: White-House, Va., May 26, 1862. The great body of our army have safely, and, with but little opposition, crossed the Chickahominy river, and our advanced guard is within five miles of the city of Richmond. This fact dispels the heretofore prevalent idea that the enemy would make a bold defence on the west bank of the river alre
Thaddeus Stevens (search for this): article 1
at the bottom of this movement, and that these Abolition radicals have been playing their cards with our armies in Virginia so as to bring about some great disaster, under the pressure of which the administration and the army might be dragged headlong into an exterminating crusade against Southern slavery. This is our solution of this unfortunate repulse of General Banks. We trace it to the enmity of Senators Wilson, Trumbull, Sumner and others of that clique in the Senate, and to Thaddeus Stevens, Lovejoy and their abolition brethren of the House; and to their successful tricks and intrigues to break up the army and the plans of Gen. McClellan, to stop recruiting for the army, when fifty thousand more men were needed to secure our conquests in Virginia, and a hundred thousand more to push the rebels speedily out of the State. Let the responsibility then rest where it belongs. We cannot consent that either the President or the Secretary of War shall be made the scapegoat for a
Andy Johnson (search for this): article 1
s army was divided into three armies, and with half his previous force he was shipped off to Yorktown. As he advances he finds the enemy in front in much superior numbers to his own. He calls for reinforcements. They are supplied from General McDowell; but thus depleted, McDowell becomes apprehensive of danger and calls for other troops. They are supplied from the army of Gen. Banks, who has thus been pounced upon, cut up, despoiled, and driven out by those watchful rebel guerrillas, Generals Johnson and Ewell. But why was not Gen. Banks reinforced from some other quarter? We answer, that it was because Mr. Senator Wilson, the head of the Military Committee of the Senate, and his Congressional Abolition clique, after the rebel evacuate on of Manassas, brought about the suspension of volunteering; that the hostility of this clique to Gen. McClellan and his well-considered plans was at the bottom of this movement, and that these Abolition radicals have been playing their cards w
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