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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 4
boasting — has, we are informed, telegraphed to Richmond that he is entrenched at Corinth, and prepared to defy the Federals, whatever numbers they may bring against him. In Mississippi, therefore, as in Virginia, the North has now to fight the sickly season. General Beauregard, in a vast mountain region, where a mere handful of steady troops might hold in check an army, is to look down on the plain below, and leave the marshes of the Tennessee to do his work, unless the enemy retires to Paducah or Illinois, and fights his way back again with the black frost next October or November. No important news at such a time, when the waning hours of spring have passed away in our own cooler latitude, can only mean that the war which the North is waging on the South is interminable. It is a war of glints — a drawn battle between two sturdy pug --in which the numbers resources of the North count for nothing.--Science, untiring energy, and devotion, are the effect for the Parrott guns whic
New England (United States) (search for this): article 4
his way back again with the black frost next October or November. No important news at such a time, when the waning hours of spring have passed away in our own cooler latitude, can only mean that the war which the North is waging on the South is interminable. It is a war of glints — a drawn battle between two sturdy pug --in which the numbers resources of the North count for nothing.--Science, untiring energy, and devotion, are the effect for the Parrott guns which Pennsylvania and the New England States supply. The Southerners, to a man, will fight resolutely to the bitter and in a war forced on them; and it is not possible to divine how the North is to recede from its position. Without foreign intervention there is, perhaps, but one way in which the Goodian not can be out. Were Beauregard to successfully resist the attack at Grant, Buell, and leck, at Corinth, and these Generals to keep the field until sickness obliged them to retire; were McClellan to rem before Yorktow
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 4
Illinois, and fights his way back again with the black frost next October or November. No important news at such a time, when the waning hours of spring have passed away in our own cooler latitude, can only mean that the war which the North is waging on the South is interminable. It is a war of glints — a drawn battle between two sturdy pug --in which the numbers resources of the North count for nothing.--Science, untiring energy, and devotion, are the effect for the Parrott guns which Pennsylvania and the New England States supply. The Southerners, to a man, will fight resolutely to the bitter and in a war forced on them; and it is not possible to divine how the North is to recede from its position. Without foreign intervention there is, perhaps, but one way in which the Goodian not can be out. Were Beauregard to successfully resist the attack at Grant, Buell, and leck, at Corinth, and these Generals to keep the field until sickness obliged them to retire; were McClellan to
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 4
English Press on "the Situation."the Situation in America. [From the London Times, May 6.] If we look with attention at the details of the recent engagements we shall be dispelled to conclude that the Federals have mode greater progress in military efficiency than their antagonists. Both at Fort Donelson, and still more conspicuously at Pittsburg, the Confederates did as much as would have secured them the victory if the Federals had been no better soldiers than they were at Bull Run. There cannot be a greater contrast than that between the invincible and unflinching endurance of the Unionists under the fierce onset of Beauregard and the panic and flight of a whole army before Johnston's division at Manassas. The Federals--at any rate those of the Western army--have learned to stand, and the Confederates can no longer snatch a sudden victory by a rapid assault. Whether the army of the East has been raised to the same standard of efficiency is what remains to be en, and the s
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
English Press on "the Situation."the Situation in America. [From the London Times, May 6.] If we look with attention at the details of the recent engagements we shall be dispelled to conclude that the Federals have mode greater progress in military efficiency than their antagonists. Both at Fort Donelson, and still more conspicuously at Pittsburg, the Confederates did as much as would have secured them the victory if the Federals had been no better soldiers than they were at Bull Run. There cannot be a greater contrast than that between the invincible and unflinching endurance of the Unionists under the fierce onset of Beauregard and the panic and flight of a whole army before Johnston's division at Manassas. The Federals--at any rate those of the Western army--have learned to stand, and the Confederates can no longer snatch a sudden victory by a rapid assault. Whether the army of the East has been raised to the same standard of efficiency is what remains to be en, and the su
France (France) (search for this): article 4
e. Though the proposal of referring the matter to universal suffrage is one which, in itself, it neither is unfitting in France to make, nor would be unreasonable in the States to accept it is, after all, but a proposal to have done over again what ficult to conclude that that which the North has refused and resisted at such cost, it would grant at the request or of France; and it is equally difficult to see what effective steps France could take were she denied and defied. As to this countrFrance could take were she denied and defied. As to this country, there seems no course open to her but inaction and almost silence.--We have no right to venture beyond friendly advice; and the fact that our interests are deeply concerned in a speedy settlement of the American subjects to suspicion and aversionreld argues, from the reports of M. Mercier's visit to Richmond, that the beginning of the end is not distant. It says France and England suffer more than neutrals over suffered from any contest, and both begin to regard the war as interminable an
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 4
by Northern troops, the position of the belligerents shall be anything like what it was at the last advices, or if indeed the position is not much more entirely altered than it would now be rational to expect, the facts will be regarded as insuring, in the absence of any new element, another year's war. Against such are suit, it is understood that the French Emperor is now more than inclined not only to protest but to act. More than probable, he will first propose to move in concert with great Britain; but we may assume, at least, in passing, that any such proposal would be declined by our Government. The Emperor would, in that case, go to work by himself. He will, perhaps, begin by a mere friendly remonstrance, addressed to both parties, but practically meant or needed only for the North--a remonstrance which there is desperately little chance of producing any effect beyond, at b a civil expression or resentment at foreign intermeddling. The course to which the Emperor would the
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 4
has, we are informed, telegraphed to Richmond that he is entrenched at Corinth, and prepared to defy the Federals, whatever numbers they may bring against him. In Mississippi, therefore, as in Virginia, the North has now to fight the sickly season. General Beauregard, in a vast mountain region, where a mere handful of steady troops might hold in check an army, is to look down on the plain below, and leave the marshes of the Tennessee to do his work, unless the enemy retires to Paducah or Illinois, and fights his way back again with the black frost next October or November. No important news at such a time, when the waning hours of spring have passed away in our own cooler latitude, can only mean that the war which the North is waging on the South is interminable. It is a war of glints — a drawn battle between two sturdy pug --in which the numbers resources of the North count for nothing.--Science, untiring energy, and devotion, are the effect for the Parrott guns which Pennsylvan
United States (United States) (search for this): article 4
ese is matter only of unassisted conjecture; but there is more than conjecture as to something like what has been indicated being at present not only the desire but the design of the French Government. The prospect is not a cheerful one. Though the proposal of referring the matter to universal suffrage is one which, in itself, it neither is unfitting in France to make, nor would be unreasonable in the States to accept it is, after all, but a proposal to have done over again what the Confederate States did in the spring of last year. They did then, as they would again do now, vote themselves out of the Union--and that is just the result against which the North has been fighting. In a word, for the North to accede to the French proposal would just be certainly, though indirectly, to concede separation. It is difficult to conclude that that which the North has refused and resisted at such cost, it would grant at the request or of France; and it is equally difficult to see what eff
n no better soldiers than they were at Bull Run. There cannot be a greater contrast than that between the invincible and unflinching endurance of the Unionists under the fierce onset of Beauregard and the panic and flight of a whole army before Johnston's division at Manassas. The Federals--at any rate those of the Western army--have learned to stand, and the Confederates can no longer snatch a sudden victory by a rapid assault. Whether the army of the East has been raised to the same standare Beauregard to successfully resist the attack at Grant, Buell, and leck, at Corinth, and these Generals to keep the field until sickness obliged them to retire; were McClellan to rem before Yorktown until his troops became and yielded to General Johnston on the Peninsula, without any really desperate effort, it is not improbable that the staunches? Northern Unionist would think seriously of giving way and advocating the adoption of a Secession plank in the next Republican party platform. F
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