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Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 18
s. General Casey's troops were forced to retire before super numbers, leaving all their camp equipage and two batteries. Colonel Valley, in endeavoring to save his batteries, was killed, Some of the troops in this division from New York and Pennsylvania behaved very badly. Many of the officers were killed and wounded in endeavoring to really their men. General Heintzolman, on ascertaining the result, ordered forward a portion of the divisions of Generals Kearney and Hooker to regain the Why this happened time will show. Brigadier-General Casey regular army officer, and had under his command three brigades. They were originally composed of a brigade under colonel vis, consisting of the 10th Pennsylvania, 11th Maine, Pennsylvania, 51st New York; and Col. Berdan's Sharpshooters; a second under Col. Tidball of the 52nd New York; the 85th Pennsylvania, and the 93d Pennsylvania; and a third, under Col. Aften of the th United States infantry, the 85th New York, and 17th New
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 18
pike leading over Bottom Bridge, and within seven miles of Richmond. The attack was made about 1 o'clock, on Saturday afternoon by General Hill's division, composed of five Rebel brigades, the troops being for the most part from Virginia, South Carolina and Georgia. The fight here was disastrous. General Casey's troops were forced to retire before super numbers, leaving all their camp equipage and two batteries. Colonel Valley, in endeavoring to save his batteries, was killed, Some of thry instance that our men charged. they were Victorians. These two divisions did nobly, driving the rebels at every point until dark. The enemy's loss here was very heavy, many of them being killed by the bayonet. Gen. Pettigrew, of South Carolina, was taken prisoner, and we had about too other prisoners. Opinion of the press.[from the New York Tribune, (Editorial,) June 2d]the Levered before Richmond. The news from the army before Richmond, which we publish this morning, thou
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 18
A ta gram from Washington states, on the authority of unofficial dispatches, first, that the battle fought on Saturday and Sunday resulted in a victory for the Federal arms; and secondly, that "the importance and dimensions of the victory increase as they are hourly developed." A Baltimore paper says: Lieutenant Davis has succeeded, after some difficulty, in establishing communication between the land forces under General McClellan and the gunboats in the James river, below City Point. He describes the Galena as being so much cut up with the enemy's shot that she will be obliged to go into dock for repairs before she can be brought into action again. From the Valley of the Doar The following Federal account of affairs in the Valley probably contains the usual amount of misrepresentation: Washington, June 2--Information was received at the War Department this evening that General Fremont had encountered and beaten, near Strasburg, yesterday afternoon an
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 18
contains the usual amount of misrepresentation: Washington, June 2--Information was received at the War Department this evening that General Fremont had encountered and beaten, near Strasburg, yesterday afternoon and this morning, a part of Jackson's army, which is in full re Fremont's Headquarters, Near Steasburg, Jane --General Fremont, with a strong column, left Franklin last Sunday, and by rapid forced marches crossed the Shenandoah Mountain ranges, Marching nearly one hundred mvance brigade, under Col. Chisevert, occupied Strasburg last high without resistance, Jackson rapidly retreating before our forces. A midnight reconnaissance three miles beyond Strasburg on Sunday night came upon a rope barricade and amo of Jackson's rear guard. Our men retired successfully, however, with the loss of only three wounded. Col. Figgetmentel of Gen. Fremont's staff, with only fifteen men brilliantly charged and put to fight a bony or cavalry commanded by Ashby in person.
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): article 18
last high without resistance, Jackson rapidly retreating before our forces. A midnight reconnaissance three miles beyond Strasburg on Sunday night came upon a rope barricade and amo of Jackson's rear guard. Our men retired successfully, however, with the loss of only three wounded. Col. Figgetmentel of Gen. Fremont's staff, with only fifteen men brilliantly charged and put to fight a bony or cavalry commanded by Ashby in person. The loss in Gen. Banks's army. The Albany. (N. Y.) Argus says: The loss in the disastrous defeat and flight! of Gen. Banks will, it is feared, prove very heavy. No official account can yet be obtained, but by roundabout ways something of the extent of the loss can be gathered. A dispatch sent to Montpelier, Vt., states that three hundred of the Vermont cavalry, mostly from that neighborhood, are missing, including Major Collina, Capt. Bean, and lieutenants Wurd and Danforth. In company A, Capt. Platt, five men only have escaped. T
Montpelier (Vermont, United States) (search for this): article 18
of only three wounded. Col. Figgetmentel of Gen. Fremont's staff, with only fifteen men brilliantly charged and put to fight a bony or cavalry commanded by Ashby in person. The loss in Gen. Banks's army. The Albany. (N. Y.) Argus says: The loss in the disastrous defeat and flight! of Gen. Banks will, it is feared, prove very heavy. No official account can yet be obtained, but by roundabout ways something of the extent of the loss can be gathered. A dispatch sent to Montpelier, Vt., states that three hundred of the Vermont cavalry, mostly from that neighborhood, are missing, including Major Collina, Capt. Bean, and lieutenants Wurd and Danforth. In company A, Capt. Platt, five men only have escaped. These are Captain Platt, Lieutenant Edwards, and Corporal Grost, Reyncids and Whippie, all officers. The loss of stores will also prove to have been very great. The Pittsburg Chontole learns that it will amount to at least two millions of dollars. Its corresponden
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 18
ss on both sides. A ta gram from Washington states, on the authority of unofficial dispatches, first, that the battle fought on Saturday and Sunday resulted in a victory for the Federal arms; and secondly, that "the importance and dimensions of the victory increase as they are hourly developed." A Baltimore paper says: Lieutenant Davis has succeeded, after some difficulty, in establishing communication between the land forces under General McClellan and the gunboats in the James river, below City Point. He describes the Galena as being so much cut up with the enemy's shot that she will be obliged to go into dock for repairs before she can be brought into action again. From the Valley of the Doar The following Federal account of affairs in the Valley probably contains the usual amount of misrepresentation: Washington, June 2--Information was received at the War Department this evening that General Fremont had encountered and beaten, near Strasburg, yes
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 18
Richmond have been fought, on both of which our troops have been victorious. The loss on both sides was heavy. The battle was opened up the enemy making an attack on Gone al Casey's Division, encamped near Seven Pines, on the turnpike leading over Bottom Bridge, and within seven miles of Richmond. The attack was made about 1 o'clock, on Saturday afternoon by General Hill's division, composed of five Rebel brigades, the troops being for the most part from Virginia, South Carolina and Georgia. The fight here was disastrous. General Casey's troops were forced to retire before super numbers, leaving all their camp equipage and two batteries. Colonel Valley, in endeavoring to save his batteries, was killed, Some of the troops in this division from New York and Pennsylvania behaved very badly. Many of the officers were killed and wounded in endeavoring to really their men. General Heintzolman, on ascertaining the result, ordered forward a portion of the divisions of Genera
Wardensville (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 18
ine of battle, but Jackson declined to light, and, while holding Colonel Chisevert in cheek with a portion of his troops, withdrew his main force, and continued the retreat In the skirmish, five of the 8th Virginia and two of the 60th Ohio were wounded. The enemy's loss is unknown. Twenty-five prisoners were taken by our cavalry. Lieutenant-Colonel Dowsey, of the 3d regiment Potomac Home Brigade, in a skirmish on Thursday morning, drove a large party of Ashby's cavalry through Wardensville, killing two and wounding three. Strasburg occupied. Near Strasburg, June 9 --Gen. Fremont's advance brigade, under Col. Chisevert, occupied Strasburg last high without resistance, Jackson rapidly retreating before our forces. A midnight reconnaissance three miles beyond Strasburg on Sunday night came upon a rope barricade and amo of Jackson's rear guard. Our men retired successfully, however, with the loss of only three wounded. Col. Figgetmentel of Gen. Fremont's
Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 18
his evening that General Fremont had encountered and beaten, near Strasburg, yesterday afternoon and this morning, a part of Jackson's army,d no supplies in the country. This morning, when five miles from Strasburg, over Jackson in full retreat with his whole force on the road from Winchester to Strasburg. Col. Chisevert, commanding the advance brigade, came upon the enemy strongly posted, with artillery, whichavalry through Wardensville, killing two and wounding three. Strasburg occupied. Near Strasburg, June 9 --Gen. Fremont's advanceStrasburg, June 9 --Gen. Fremont's advance brigade, under Col. Chisevert, occupied Strasburg last high without resistance, Jackson rapidly retreating before our forces. A midnighStrasburg last high without resistance, Jackson rapidly retreating before our forces. A midnight reconnaissance three miles beyond Strasburg on Sunday night came upon a rope barricade and amo of Jackson's rear guard. Our men retired suStrasburg on Sunday night came upon a rope barricade and amo of Jackson's rear guard. Our men retired successfully, however, with the loss of only three wounded. Col. Figgetmentel of Gen. Fremont's staff, with only fifteen men brilliantly c
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