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Secessionville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
Severe battle near Charleston. The ball has opened in earnest on the South Carolina coast, and appearances indicate that the enemy will withhold no effort to get possession of Charleston. A severe battle took place on Monday morning, on James Island, five miles from the city, commencing by an attack of five regiments of Yankees reinforced by artillery, upon the batteries at Secessionville. Col. Lamar commanded the Confederates, and with four hundred troops repulsed the enemy three times with great slaughter. The enemy fought bravely, but was defeated. A telegraphic dispatch received yesterday informs us that our victory was complete. The enemy's loss is supposed to be about four hundred, including thirty or more prisoners.--Our loss is estimated at from fifty to one hundred. Col. Lamar was wounded, and Captains Reed and King and Lieut. Edwards were killed. It was confidently expected on Monday evening that the attack would soon be renewed. The Confederates were much exhaus
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
Severe battle near Charleston. The ball has opened in earnest on the South Carolina coast, and appearances indicate that the enemy will withhold no effort to get possession of Charleston. A severe battle took place on Monday morning, on James Island, five miles from the city, commencing by an attack of five regiments of Yankees reinforced by artillery, upon the batteries at Secessionville. Col. Lamar commanded the Confederates, and with four hundred troops repulsed the enemy three times with great slaughter. The enemy fought bravely, but was defeated. A telegraphic dispatch received yesterday informs us that our victory was complete. The enemy's loss is supposed to be about four hundred, including thirty or more prisoners.--Our loss is estimated at from fifty to one hundred. Col. Lamar was wounded, and Captains Reed and King and Lieut. Edwards were killed. It was confidently expected on Monday evening that the attack would soon be renewed. The Confederates were much exhaus
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
Severe battle near Charleston. The ball has opened in earnest on the South Carolina coast, and appearances indicate that the enemy will withhold no effort to get possession of Charleston. A severe battle took place on Monday morning, on James Island, five miles from the city, commencing by an attack of five regiments of Yankees reinforced by artillery, upon the batteries at Secessionville. Col. Lamar commanded the Confederates, and with four hundred troops repulsed the enemy three times with great slaughter. The enemy fought bravely, but was defeated. A telegraphic dispatch received yesterday informs us that our victory was complete. The enemy's loss is supposed to be about four hundred, including thirty or more prisoners.--Our loss is estimated at from fifty to one hundred. Col. Lamar was wounded, and Captains Reed and King and Lieut. Edwards were killed. It was confidently expected on Monday evening that the attack would soon be renewed. The Confederates were much exhaus
batteries at Secessionville. Col. Lamar commanded the Confederates, and with four hundred troops repulsed the enemy three times with great slaughter. The enemy fought bravely, but was defeated. A telegraphic dispatch received yesterday informs us that our victory was complete. The enemy's loss is supposed to be about four hundred, including thirty or more prisoners.--Our loss is estimated at from fifty to one hundred. Col. Lamar was wounded, and Captains Reed and King and Lieut. Edwards were killed. It was confidently expected on Monday evening that the attack would soon be renewed. The Confederates were much exhausted by the shelling of the enemy, day and night, for a week; yet men never fought with more determined bravery. The troops engaged were an entire regiment from Charleston, a battalion from Hagood's 47th Georgia regiment, Lamar's battery, and a detachment of the Chatham Artillery, of Savannah. Col. Lamar was complimented on the field by Generals Evans and Pemberton.
on James Island, five miles from the city, commencing by an attack of five regiments of Yankees reinforced by artillery, upon the batteries at Secessionville. Col. Lamar commanded the Confederates, and with four hundred troops repulsed the enemy three times with great slaughter. The enemy fought bravely, but was defeated. A tey was complete. The enemy's loss is supposed to be about four hundred, including thirty or more prisoners.--Our loss is estimated at from fifty to one hundred. Col. Lamar was wounded, and Captains Reed and King and Lieut. Edwards were killed. It was confidently expected on Monday evening that the attack would soon be renewed. Tnd night, for a week; yet men never fought with more determined bravery. The troops engaged were an entire regiment from Charleston, a battalion from Hagood's 47th Georgia regiment, Lamar's battery, and a detachment of the Chatham Artillery, of Savannah. Col. Lamar was complimented on the field by Generals Evans and Pemberton.
y, upon the batteries at Secessionville. Col. Lamar commanded the Confederates, and with four hundred troops repulsed the enemy three times with great slaughter. The enemy fought bravely, but was defeated. A telegraphic dispatch received yesterday informs us that our victory was complete. The enemy's loss is supposed to be about four hundred, including thirty or more prisoners.--Our loss is estimated at from fifty to one hundred. Col. Lamar was wounded, and Captains Reed and King and Lieut. Edwards were killed. It was confidently expected on Monday evening that the attack would soon be renewed. The Confederates were much exhausted by the shelling of the enemy, day and night, for a week; yet men never fought with more determined bravery. The troops engaged were an entire regiment from Charleston, a battalion from Hagood's 47th Georgia regiment, Lamar's battery, and a detachment of the Chatham Artillery, of Savannah. Col. Lamar was complimented on the field by Generals Evans and
Pemberton (search for this): article 3
atteries at Secessionville. Col. Lamar commanded the Confederates, and with four hundred troops repulsed the enemy three times with great slaughter. The enemy fought bravely, but was defeated. A telegraphic dispatch received yesterday informs us that our victory was complete. The enemy's loss is supposed to be about four hundred, including thirty or more prisoners.--Our loss is estimated at from fifty to one hundred. Col. Lamar was wounded, and Captains Reed and King and Lieut. Edwards were killed. It was confidently expected on Monday evening that the attack would soon be renewed. The Confederates were much exhausted by the shelling of the enemy, day and night, for a week; yet men never fought with more determined bravery. The troops engaged were an entire regiment from Charleston, a battalion from Hagood's 47th Georgia regiment, Lamar's battery, and a detachment of the Chatham Artillery, of Savannah. Col. Lamar was complimented on the field by Generals Evans and Pemberton.
ed by artillery, upon the batteries at Secessionville. Col. Lamar commanded the Confederates, and with four hundred troops repulsed the enemy three times with great slaughter. The enemy fought bravely, but was defeated. A telegraphic dispatch received yesterday informs us that our victory was complete. The enemy's loss is supposed to be about four hundred, including thirty or more prisoners.--Our loss is estimated at from fifty to one hundred. Col. Lamar was wounded, and Captains Reed and King and Lieut. Edwards were killed. It was confidently expected on Monday evening that the attack would soon be renewed. The Confederates were much exhausted by the shelling of the enemy, day and night, for a week; yet men never fought with more determined bravery. The troops engaged were an entire regiment from Charleston, a battalion from Hagood's 47th Georgia regiment, Lamar's battery, and a detachment of the Chatham Artillery, of Savannah. Col. Lamar was complimented on the field by Gener
kees reinforced by artillery, upon the batteries at Secessionville. Col. Lamar commanded the Confederates, and with four hundred troops repulsed the enemy three times with great slaughter. The enemy fought bravely, but was defeated. A telegraphic dispatch received yesterday informs us that our victory was complete. The enemy's loss is supposed to be about four hundred, including thirty or more prisoners.--Our loss is estimated at from fifty to one hundred. Col. Lamar was wounded, and Captains Reed and King and Lieut. Edwards were killed. It was confidently expected on Monday evening that the attack would soon be renewed. The Confederates were much exhausted by the shelling of the enemy, day and night, for a week; yet men never fought with more determined bravery. The troops engaged were an entire regiment from Charleston, a battalion from Hagood's 47th Georgia regiment, Lamar's battery, and a detachment of the Chatham Artillery, of Savannah. Col. Lamar was complimented on the
batteries at Secessionville. Col. Lamar commanded the Confederates, and with four hundred troops repulsed the enemy three times with great slaughter. The enemy fought bravely, but was defeated. A telegraphic dispatch received yesterday informs us that our victory was complete. The enemy's loss is supposed to be about four hundred, including thirty or more prisoners.--Our loss is estimated at from fifty to one hundred. Col. Lamar was wounded, and Captains Reed and King and Lieut. Edwards were killed. It was confidently expected on Monday evening that the attack would soon be renewed. The Confederates were much exhausted by the shelling of the enemy, day and night, for a week; yet men never fought with more determined bravery. The troops engaged were an entire regiment from Charleston, a battalion from Hagood's 47th Georgia regiment, Lamar's battery, and a detachment of the Chatham Artillery, of Savannah. Col. Lamar was complimented on the field by Generals Evans and Pemberton.