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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 14
hout flinching Capt. Johnson was conspicuous for his bravery throughout the period in which his battery was engaged, and our informant says that not an inch of ground would have been yielded while a man remained to serve the guns, had not Gen. Lee, observing the deadly effect of the enemy's fire, ordered them to withdraw from the contest. The casualties, both in men and horses, were heavy. Among the sad incidents of the battle may be mentioned the death of Lieut. W. Eugene Webster, of Maryland, chief executive officer of the Arsenal, who was acting as Aid to Gen. Rodes. He fell in the thickest of the fight, while gallantly cheering on a regiment His body was brought to the city on Saturday. Lieut. W. was a relative of Gen. Lee. We regret to learn that Major T. S. Skinner, 1st N. C., was killed in the engagement on Thursday evening, in the attack on the Federal entrenchments. At Garnett's farm. About eleven o'clock Saturday, Capt. Monday's battery opened fire upon
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
wounded, having lost a leg. His condition is at least, exceeding critical. Capt. Wood McDonald, son of Col. Angus W. McDonald, of Winchester, and aid to Gen. Elzey, was killed in the same engagement. Major P. J. Sinclair, of the 5th North Carolina regiment, received a painful wound in the thigh, and was brought to the city yesterday afternoon by Dr. Coffin, by whom his wound was dressed. He is now at the American Hotel. Private Charles Lucas, of the "Wise Artillery," from Martinsburg, was killed on Friday afternoon. His brother, Serg't Benj. Lucas, of the same company, was seriously wounded. In the engagement near "Fair Oaks," yesterday afternoon, Brigadier General Griffith had one of his legs broken, and apprehensions are felt that amputation may be necessary. A Federal Lieutenant, who was captured yesterday morning and brought to the head quarters of Gen. Lee, reports that two entire regiments had deserted during the morning. The Confederate forces ye
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 14
are heard in rapid succession, which are recognized and cheered by our men--"It is Jackson!" they shout, "on their right and rear!" Yes, two or three brigades of Jackson's army have flanked the enemy, and are getting in the rear! Now, the fighting was bitter and terrific. Worked up to madness, Wilcox, Featherstone and Pryor dashresented in the Federal line — cavalry were there in force, and when our men emerged from the woods, attempted to charge, but the three brigades on the right, and Jackson's three brigades on the left, closed up ranks and poured such deadly volleys upon the horsemen, that they left the ground in confusion and entirely for their infaiment Virginia volunteers. He was shot through the head and expired almost instantly. At the time he received the fatal shot, he was acting Brigadier-General of Jackson's celebrated "Stonewall Brigade." His body was brought to this city yesterday morning, and during the day deposited in Holly wood Cemetery. Maj. Frank B. Jones,
Neshoba (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 14
, Holland, Heart, Harrow, Geo. W. Johnston, E. P. Jones, W. T. Flint, James, Kimball, Mitchell, Mahoney, McLeod, Morton, O Brien, F. S. Price, Ritchie, Rose, Sacrey, T. H. Thompson, B. M. Temple, Partington, W. T. Smith, T. T. Yager. This list proves the desperate bravery exhibited by the command in the bloody strife.--We learn that Mr. Dawson, a young English man, who came over in the Nashville, volunteered for the engagement, and received a wound while acting most gallantly. The Crenshaw Battery, of this city, (attached to Gregg's brigade,) acted with distinguished gallantry in Friday's battle. The casualties are: Serg't S. Strother and Private Robt Hines, killed; Corporal Wm. B. Allen, Marion Knowles, Geo. Young, Benton Graves, Daniel Lancaster, Thos. Mallory, and Thomas Ryder, wounded. The company lost fully one third of their horses, and had three of their guns disabled. All the pieces were brought off the field, however, though, owing to a lack of horses, some had to
Holly River, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
. Mitchell, jr They were all young men. Col. J. G. Seymond, of the 6th Louisiana was killed Saturday. Among the killed in the desperate fight of Friday afternoon, was Col. J. W. Allen of the 2d regiment Virginia volunteers. He was shot through the head and expired almost instantly. At the time he received the fatal shot, he was acting Brigadier-General of Jackson's celebrated "Stonewall Brigade." His body was brought to this city yesterday morning, and during the day deposited in Holly wood Cemetery. Maj. Frank B. Jones, of the same regiment, is thought to be mortally wounded, having lost a leg. His condition is at least, exceeding critical. Capt. Wood McDonald, son of Col. Angus W. McDonald, of Winchester, and aid to Gen. Elzey, was killed in the same engagement. Major P. J. Sinclair, of the 5th North Carolina regiment, received a painful wound in the thigh, and was brought to the city yesterday afternoon by Dr. Coffin, by whom his wound was dressed. He is now
Powhite Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
position at the White House, on the Pamunkey, but all the stores of the enemy at that point were destroyed by them in their retreat. An official Dispatch. The following dispatch was received by President Davis at a late hour on Friday night. It relates to the operations of Friday Headquarters, June 27, 1862 His Excellency, President Davis: Mr. President --Profoundly grateful to Almighty God for the signal victory granted to us, it is my pleasing task to announce to you the success achieved by this army to-day. The enemy was this morning driven from strong position behind Beaver Dam Creek, and pursued to that behind Powhite Creek, and finally after a severe contest of five hours entirely repulsed from the field. Night put an end to the contest. I grieve to stand that our loss in officers and men is great. We sleep on the field, and shall renew the contest in the morning. I have the honor to be, very respectably, (signed)R. E. Lee, General
Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
ar!" Yes, two or three brigades of Jackson's army have flanked the enemy, and are getting in the rear! Now, the fighting was bitter and terrific. Worked up to madness, Wilcox, Featherstone and Pryor dash forward at a run, and drive the enemy with irresistible fury — to our left emerge Hood's Texan brigade, Whiting's comes after, and Pender follows! The line is now complete, and "forward" rings from one end of the line to the other, and the Yankees, over 30,000 strong, begin to retreat! Wheeling their artillery from the front, the Federals turn part of it to break our left, and save their retreat. The very earth shakes at the roar! Not one piece of ours has yet opened! all has been done with bullet and bayonet, and onward press our troops through camps upon camps, capturing guns, stores, arms, clothing, &c. Yet, like bloodhounds on the trail, the six brigades sweep everything before them, presenting an unbroken, solid front, and closing in upon the enemy, keep up an incessant su
Twymans Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
took this or that battery, for ever since the capture of Sherman's at Manassas the question of conquered batteries has always been a vexed one. The position of regiments changes so often in an engagement that one, perhaps, who did but little, by some lucky chance, finds itself before a feebly defended or deserted battery, and simply for the trouble of planting a flag thereon has honor conferred on it for doing nothing! There were not less than six batteries captured in the battles of "Gaines's Mill," yet not one of any of our regiments can lay positive claim to any single one piece, for all are contested property. Some of the 12th Mississippi claim the beautiful brass pieces so much admired, and officers say that when they arrived in front a young man named Cassidy jumped upon one of the horses, and wished to drive them off or turn them on the enemy, but was not allowed. The 5th Texas, after hard fighting, found itself before a battery and cleared it, but yet some other regiment
Cold Harbor Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
ins, Joseph Beall, Robert Norris, J. Norris, F. J. Weldon, Green Allison, W. S. Futral, N. T. Gibson, H. H. Gibson, Wm. Jester, T. T. Bishop. Engagement at Coal Harbor. In the fight on Friday, Johnson's Battery, of this city, occupied an exposed position on the Coal Harbor road, about one mile from Coal Harbor, and was subCoal Harbor road, about one mile from Coal Harbor, and was subjected to a fire remarkable for its accuracy, which (as an eye witness informs us) the command encountered without flinching Capt. Johnson was conspicuous for his bravery throughout the period in which his battery was engaged, and our informant says that not an inch of ground would have been yielded while a man remained to serve thCoal Harbor, and was subjected to a fire remarkable for its accuracy, which (as an eye witness informs us) the command encountered without flinching Capt. Johnson was conspicuous for his bravery throughout the period in which his battery was engaged, and our informant says that not an inch of ground would have been yielded while a man remained to serve the guns, had not Gen. Lee, observing the deadly effect of the enemy's fire, ordered them to withdraw from the contest. The casualties, both in men and horses, were heavy. Among the sad incidents of the battle may be mentioned the death of Lieut. W. Eugene Webster, of Maryland, chief executive officer of the Arsenal, who was ac
Chickahominy (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
owed and conversed with prisoners, who informed us that their loss on Friday at Meadow Bridge, Mechanicsville, and Ellsyson's Mills, had been fearful, and that the whole night had been occupied in burial. The Federals carry off all their dead and wounded, as fast as shot, and we only discover those who fall and are left at the actual moment of retreat. This inforformation we believe to be correct. The heads of our three columns having reached Waller Hogan's farm, north bank of the Chickahominy, about 9 miles northeast of Richmond, all came to a halt, and Gens. Lee and Longstreet took up quarters in the house and made dispositions for a further advance towards Gaines's Mills, distant about one mile through the woods. Featherstone's brigade having suffered much in the morning, Wilcox led, being followed by Pryor, and Featherstone in reserve. The composition of Wilcox's command is mostly Alabamans; Pryor has the 14th Louisiana, St. Paul's battalion, 3d Virginia, and one other r
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