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West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
confusion among them. As an evidence of this we may state the fact that Dr. Thomas Carpenter and two companions succeeded in gathering up upwards of fifty, who, without any organization, were wandering about in apparent bewilderment. Other parties were similarly captured, and during the day small squads of a dozen or more were continually arriving in the city. During the day, a portion of the cavalry of Gen. Stuart captured and destroyed several transports on the Pamunkey river near West Point. Thus are the means of escape for the enemy being cut off; so that, in any view of the case, there seems to be little probability of their getting off in force. Early in the day it was stated, with some degree of plausibility, that the forces of Gen. Jackson had succeeded in bagging some forty-five hundred of the enemy; and although we have no positive confirmation of the statement, we are inclined to think it correct in the main. Certain it is, that the vigilance of that distinguis
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
thorough state of confusion among them. As an evidence of this we may state the fact that Dr. Thomas Carpenter and two companions succeeded in gathering up upwards of fifty, who, without any organization, were wandering about in apparent bewilderment. Other parties were similarly captured, and during the day small squads of a dozen or more were continually arriving in the city. During the day, a portion of the cavalry of Gen. Stuart captured and destroyed several transports on the Pamunkey river near West Point. Thus are the means of escape for the enemy being cut off; so that, in any view of the case, there seems to be little probability of their getting off in force. Early in the day it was stated, with some degree of plausibility, that the forces of Gen. Jackson had succeeded in bagging some forty-five hundred of the enemy; and although we have no positive confirmation of the statement, we are inclined to think it correct in the main. Certain it is, that the vigilance
San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): article 1
llant dead. We learn with much regret that Major Austin E. Smith, of Gen. Whiting's staff, died on Sunday last in this city from the effects of a wound received on Friday, while gallantly leading an assault against one of the enemy's heavy batteries. He was disabled by a fragment of shell which struck him in the shoulder, and amputation was subsequently resorted to, but he died shortly afterwards. Major S. (who was a son of ex-Governor Smith,) occupied the position of Navy Agent in San Francisco under Buchanan's Administration. He left California for Virginia after the State seceded, was arrested in New York and thrown into Fort Warren, where he remained until his exchange was effected. Since his return to Virginia he has been among the most active in the defence of his native soil. Horrors of War. In addition to several hundred Confederate soldiers who lay wounded on the battle field yesterday, and of whose situation notice was given the Government authorities, there
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
"Oh, yes," replied the Federal, "he is in the Valley, and has been largely reinforced." "Indeed," was the rejoinder; "now what would you say if I was to tell you that Stonewall is now in the rear of your army on the Chickahominy, with a fair prospect of giving McClellan a worse rout than he gave Banks on the Shenandoah?" The Federal started as if he had received another shock from a bomb-shell, and at once subsided into silence. Another Batch of Yankees. There arrived at the Confederate States Military Prison on Sunday, June 29th, two hundred and seventy-one Yankee prisoners of war, including the following officers, viz: Major D. Davidson, 4th U. S. infantry. James Markson, 2d Lieutenant company K, 73d New York. Surgeon M. Grimes, (Major,) 2d N. York, Sickles's Excelsior Brigade. 1st Lieut. A. M. Judson, company E. 83d Penn's. 2d Lieut. Geo. I. Brown, company B, 2d Maine. John J. McGowan, Surgeon, (Major,) 2d N. York, Sickles's Excelsior Brigade.
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
heavily loaded. Our field pieces on the Chesterfield side engaged the gunboats and poured "hot fire" into them. The gunboats dropped down to Turkey Island, followed by our field pieces. The enemy were fleeing down the river bank, hotly pursued by our troops, and were falling thick and fast at last accounts. The firing was incessant. Col. Lamar. In our report of the engagement of Gen. Magruder on Sunday afternoon, as published yesterday, we noticed the capture of Col. Lamar, of Georgia, after receiving a severe wound. We are gratified to be able to state that the gallant Colonel was yesterday recaptured and brought to this city. In addition, some two hundred Yankees were taken at the same point. The gallant dead. We learn with much regret that Major Austin E. Smith, of Gen. Whiting's staff, died on Sunday last in this city from the effects of a wound received on Friday, while gallantly leading an assault against one of the enemy's heavy batteries. He was disab
Green Isle (Michigan, United States) (search for this): article 1
th side of the Chickabominy, the redoubtable Stuart was not less successful in frustrating the plans of the young Napoleon on the north side. Dashing down to the White House, on the Pamunkey, he succeeded in bagging about 2,500 of the grand Union army at that point. A number of these were brought to the city during the day yesterday, and the others we understand, are on route hither. Of this number, there is a large sprinkling of the foreign element, representatives some of them of the "Green Isle of Erin," and' others of the German "Faderland." Operations yesterday. Of operations yesterday there is little to be said. They were not destitute of importance, however and their results were of a serious nature to the enemy. The "folds of the anaconda are tightening around him." and it is very evident that the "backbone" of the rebellion has been greatly strengthened. There was some fighting, it is true, resulting more from efforts of the foe to cover his retreat than from any
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
of a wound received on Friday, while gallantly leading an assault against one of the enemy's heavy batteries. He was disabled by a fragment of shell which struck him in the shoulder, and amputation was subsequently resorted to, but he died shortly afterwards. Major S. (who was a son of ex-Governor Smith,) occupied the position of Navy Agent in San Francisco under Buchanan's Administration. He left California for Virginia after the State seceded, was arrested in New York and thrown into Fort Warren, where he remained until his exchange was effected. Since his return to Virginia he has been among the most active in the defence of his native soil. Horrors of War. In addition to several hundred Confederate soldiers who lay wounded on the battle field yesterday, and of whose situation notice was given the Government authorities, there remained at a point one and a half miles from Dr. Gaines's farm, the scene of the former conflict, (which is the same distance beyond New Bridge
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ng the railroad and telegraph lines and driving the Yankees this side the Chickahominy, Jackson also crossed and is now pressing hard upon them. Yesterday it was said that Generals Long street and Hill were in position in Charles City, and that the last avenue of escape for the "grand army" is cut off. Gen Magruder had gone down to reinforce Gen. Longstreet to assist in checking the retreat, while Jackson and others are steadily driving them on. The only alternative is a heavy fight the James river or an unconditional surrender of McClellan's army. While Magruder was thus successfully "pushing the enemy to the wall" on the south side of the Chickabominy, the redoubtable Stuart was not less successful in frustrating the plans of the young Napoleon on the north side. Dashing down to the White House, on the Pamunkey, he succeeded in bagging about 2,500 of the grand Union army at that point. A number of these were brought to the city during the day yesterday, and the others we un
California (California, United States) (search for this): article 1
ustin E. Smith, of Gen. Whiting's staff, died on Sunday last in this city from the effects of a wound received on Friday, while gallantly leading an assault against one of the enemy's heavy batteries. He was disabled by a fragment of shell which struck him in the shoulder, and amputation was subsequently resorted to, but he died shortly afterwards. Major S. (who was a son of ex-Governor Smith,) occupied the position of Navy Agent in San Francisco under Buchanan's Administration. He left California for Virginia after the State seceded, was arrested in New York and thrown into Fort Warren, where he remained until his exchange was effected. Since his return to Virginia he has been among the most active in the defence of his native soil. Horrors of War. In addition to several hundred Confederate soldiers who lay wounded on the battle field yesterday, and of whose situation notice was given the Government authorities, there remained at a point one and a half miles from Dr. Gain
Charles City (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
d an immense quantity of stores destroyed. Arms, baggage, overcoats, knapsacks, caps, and h cks, were scattered along the route in profusion. The latest accounts of yesterday represent the Yankee army cut in twain and trying to escape towards the James. After destroying the railroad and telegraph lines and driving the Yankees this side the Chickahominy, Jackson also crossed and is now pressing hard upon them. Yesterday it was said that Generals Long street and Hill were in position in Charles City, and that the last avenue of escape for the "grand army" is cut off. Gen Magruder had gone down to reinforce Gen. Longstreet to assist in checking the retreat, while Jackson and others are steadily driving them on. The only alternative is a heavy fight the James river or an unconditional surrender of McClellan's army. While Magruder was thus successfully "pushing the enemy to the wall" on the south side of the Chickabominy, the redoubtable Stuart was not less successful in frustrati
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