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Memphis (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 8
The battle on White Rived.Federal accounts.terrible Destruction of a Federal steamer. The much talked of "White River Expeliti in" left Memphis, Tenn., on the 19th ult., and consisted of eight gunboats. The feast proceeded very successfully for a while and captured a Confederate steamer on White river and battered down several fortifications on the way. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer says: The Union fleet had proceeded something over eighty miles up White river, when they were tired upon from a battery on the south side, but so batden among the trees that the officers could hereby determine the spot whence the pieces were discharged. The guns of the enemy were not very heavy. They sounded like 12 and 24 pounders, and subsequent examination proved they were such. The Mound City fired her how guns twice, and then her port guns, as she steamed up the river little further, making the distance between her and the upper battery, less than half a mile. The se
White River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 8
left Memphis, Tenn., on the 19th ult., and consisted of eight gunboats. The feast proceeded very successfully for a while and captured a Confederate steamer on White river and battered down several fortifications on the way. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer says: The Union fleet had proceeded something over eighty miles up White river, when they were tired upon from a battery on the south side, but so batden among the trees that the officers could hereby determine the spot whence the pieces were discharged. The guns of the enemy were not very heavy. They sounded like 12 and 24 pounders, and subsequent examination proved they were such. persons were on board, us was That the accident to the Mound City repented on the same day-- with me such effect — is a singular The obstructions in the White river, near St. Charles, have been and the . and Lexington have gone further up the on a but have dois before this time. The Mound City will be in a few days,
St. Charles, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 8
vered with ghastly wounds. Those of the rebels along the shore who had been firing at the Unionists in the water were soon charged upon by the Indianian, for whom they did not wait, but took to flight along the bank towards the village of St. Charles. A portion of the insurgents ran to a place above where the river had been obstructed, and jumping into a few small boats they had moored there, crossed the stream and disappeared in the woods. The rout was complete. The victory was cureponents the gunboat. The steam escaped in and yet, th many persons were on board, us was That the accident to the Mound City repented on the same day-- with me such effect — is a singular The obstructions in the White river, near St. Charles, have been and the . and Lexington have gone further up the on a but have dois before this time. The Mound City will be in a few days, and the National same their expeditions. Ninety-four of one men have been is thought thirty
s, was warmly kept up for eight or ten minutes, less than twenty having elapsed since the first gun had been fired from the lower battery. In the meantime Colonel Fitch had landed his five or six hundred men on the Southern bank below the first battery with the intention of attacking the upper works in the rear, and surprisingrowned. The enemy was still bent on their demonize work, and would have fired his last cartridge at the defenseless sailors, had not the brave Indianian, under Col. Fitch, succeeded by this time in reaching the rear of the fortification, where Fry commanded, and arrested the labor of destruction. The 46th Indiana rushed with ion. Great indignation was fell against the renegade Fry, (who is seriously wounded.) and he would have been killed a dozen times but for the interposition of Colonel Fitch. One of the Indianian bad his market leveled at Fry's head, and was about to pull the trigger, when his piece was knocked up by the House of his company,
sels with their burned and suffering limbs. The gunners in the upper battery turned their guns upon the suffering officers and seamen of the Mound City, and Captain Fry, the commander of the works, ordered his sharp-shooters to kill every Yankee before he could reach the shore or succor could be brought. The devilish enemy is last cartridge at the defenseless sailors, had not the brave Indianian, under Col. Fitch, succeeded by this time in reaching the rear of the fortification, where Fry commanded, and arrested the labor of destruction. The 46th Indiana rushed with a shout and a volley of musketry into the hostile works, and then charged with baire force was about five hundred, and of these about fifty were captured, and the remainder escaped in the manner I have described. Among the prisoners was Captain Fry, formerly a lieutenant in the navy, and commander of the gunboat Pontchartrain, which, with three transports, had been sunk-opposite the upper fortification. G
The battle on White Rived.Federal accounts.terrible Destruction of a Federal steamer. The much talked of "White River Expeliti in" left Memphis, Tenn., on the 19th ult., and consisted of eight gunboats. The feast proceeded very successfully for a while and captured a Confederate steamer on White river and battered down several fortifications on the way. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer says: The Union fleet had proceeded something over eighty miles up White river, when they were tired upon from a battery on the south side, but so batden among the trees that the officers could hereby determine the spot whence the pieces were discharged. The guns of the enemy were not very heavy. They sounded like 12 and 24 pounders, and subsequent examination proved they were such. The Mound City fired her how guns twice, and then her port guns, as she steamed up the river little further, making the distance between her and the upper battery, less than half a mile. The s