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Berkley (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
, which were embarked in the vicinity of Shirley. It is stated further that the banks of the river were lined with stragglers yesterday, and that they could be seen to rush eagerly to the transports as fast as they would reach the wharf. Four of the fugitives rushed into a small boat, and paddling out into the stream, were drifted to the Chesterfield shore. These were captured, and expected to reach Petersburg last evening. Several hundred Federal army wagons were seen at Berkeley, Charles City county, yesterday morning early, by citizens of Prince George. They communicated with a small tug lying out in the stream, but none of them were embarked. The wagons were protected by Federal cavalry, and known to be empty from the rattling noise which they caused when they were driven up. A detachment of Stuart's cavalry could easily bag all this valuable game. Parties from Drewry's Bluff, who arrived here last night, report heavy firing of cannon, and rapid discharges of musket
Berkley (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
ich they caused when they were driven up. A detachment of Stuart's cavalry could easily bag all this valuable game. Parties from Drewry's Bluff, who arrived here last night, report heavy firing of cannon, and rapid discharges of musketry, all day yesterday across the river. The fight was evidently progressing on the north of the James, but no accounts of results had reached Richmond last night at ten o'clock. We have positive information that the enemy were reinforced yesterday from below. We know not the extent of the reinforcements, but the Vanderbilt, a very large transport, was certainly in the lower James yesterday, crowded with troops. More reinforcements were probably carried up last night.--The immense train of wagons seen yesterday at Berkley are to be used, doubtless, for the purpose of carrying ammunition and provisions to the now much discomfited foe. It is gratifying to know that we are prepared to meet these reinforcements with fresh troops, man for man.
Turkey Island Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
uesday morning he came in tolerably well, but considerably bruised about the head. Tuesday's operations. During the forenoon of Tuesday there was no regular engagement, but much desultory firing along the whole extent of the retreating and advancing lines. In the afternoon, about 2½ o'clock, a brisk fight was commenced on the right of the left wing of our army, Jackson's corps, then situated convenient to Dr. Poindexter's farm, on the Williamsburg road, and directly opposite Turkey Island creek. The character of the country here is slightly undulating, the intervening ground between the belligerent parties consisting of open, cultivated fields, whilst the extremes are dense woods of heavy timber and thick undergrowth. From the situation occupied by our troops, the enemy was discovered in large force deploying their troops, and placing their artillery in position. Bodies of skirmishers were thrown out from our column with a view to test the disposition of the enemy. This
Deep Bottom (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
pprised of their particular participation in this grand struggle for the defence of liberty, we are not prepared to notice them specially. Yesterday's operations. Notwithstanding the heavy rains of yesterday, the two armies were not inactive, though we have no report of any severe fighting. The latest accounts we have inform us that the enemy, finding some difficulty in getting off the bulk of their forces by the way of Turkey Island, had moved to their left, in the direction of Deep Bottom, where there are good landings and deep water. But their retreat was cut off by our troops occupying the New Market road, while they were also being attacked along the lines of the Long Bridge and the Quaker roads. These three roads form a triangle of about one and a half or two miles area of low and heavily timbered land, with thick undergrowth and which, in wet weather, is almost impassable. If this information is correct — and we cannot doubt it — the total surrender must be onl
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ce, which is of much interest: We have reliable information that a portion of McClellan's army sought safety in flight as far back as Monday afternoon. This we knew Monday night, and so stated yesterday, but further confirmation of this retreat is furnished in the following communication which Col. Pannill, the Provost Marshal of this city, has kindly furnished us: Drewry's Bluff, July 1. To Col. Wm. Pannill, Provost Marshal: Capt. Upshur reports from Bermuda Hundreds on James river, at 11 o'clock last night, that the enemy (or a portion of them) was in full retreat; that their gunboats were near Shirley, on the Charles City shore, endeavoring to protect the retreat; that the Galena and two other gunboats had tired 200 shells into ranks, as they supposed, but that our forces had pressed the enemy hard, and he could hear fearfully rapid musketry firing until dark; that they were embarking their wounded above Shirley, and that many stragglers of all arms of the service
Quaker (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
erday, the two armies were not inactive, though we have no report of any severe fighting. The latest accounts we have inform us that the enemy, finding some difficulty in getting off the bulk of their forces by the way of Turkey Island, had moved to their left, in the direction of Deep Bottom, where there are good landings and deep water. But their retreat was cut off by our troops occupying the New Market road, while they were also being attacked along the lines of the Long Bridge and the Quaker roads. These three roads form a triangle of about one and a half or two miles area of low and heavily timbered land, with thick undergrowth and which, in wet weather, is almost impassable. If this information is correct — and we cannot doubt it — the total surrender must be only a question of time; and, in the absence of supplies, can not be postponed more than one or two days. Federal Barbarity. On Monday last, in the fight near Willis's Church, Winfield Byrd, of the 11th Ala
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 1
m on the side of the head. He was missed after the fight was ended, and it was feared that he had been captured; but on Tuesday morning he came in tolerably well, but considerably bruised about the head. Tuesday's operations. During the forenoon of Tuesday there was no regular engagement, but much desultory firing along the whole extent of the retreating and advancing lines. In the afternoon, about 2½ o'clock, a brisk fight was commenced on the right of the left wing of our army, Jackson's corps, then situated convenient to Dr. Poindexter's farm, on the Williamsburg road, and directly opposite Turkey Island creek. The character of the country here is slightly undulating, the intervening ground between the belligerent parties consisting of open, cultivated fields, whilst the extremes are dense woods of heavy timber and thick undergrowth. From the situation occupied by our troops, the enemy was discovered in large force deploying their troops, and placing their artillery in
Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
reach Petersburg last evening. Several hundred Federal army wagons were seen at Berkeley, Charles City county, yesterday morning early, by citizens of Prince George. They communicated with a small tug lying out in the stream, but none of them were embarked. The wagons were protected by Federal cavalry, and known to be empty from the rattling noise which they caused when they were driven up. A detachment of Stuart's cavalry could easily bag all this valuable game. Parties from Drewry's Bluff, who arrived here last night, report heavy firing of cannon, and rapid discharges of musketry, all day yesterday across the river. The fight was evidently progressing on the north of the James, but no accounts of results had reached Richmond last night at ten o'clock. We have positive information that the enemy were reinforced yesterday from below. We know not the extent of the reinforcements, but the Vanderbilt, a very large transport, was certainly in the lower James yesterday,
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
left wing of our army, a scarcely less severe fight was progressing on the right, where the division of Gen. Huger was engaged. The brigades of Mahone and Armistead had been exerting themselves against a largely overwhelming force of the enemy, but being compelled to fall back in order to rest their men. Gen. Ranson's brigade was ordered forward. It consisted of five regiments, viz: 24th, Col. Clark; 25th, Col. Kutledge, 26th, Col. Vance; 35th, Col. Ransom, and 49th, Col. Ramseur, all North Carolina troops. They were ordered to charge two heavy batteries, that were supported by not less than five Federal brigades, and all the while they were marching up to make the charge were under three fires. They did not falter, however, but went forward into the very teeth of the enemy without so much as the slightest indication of hesitation. It was, beyond question, one of the hardest fights, and one of the most desperate charges, that has been made during the whole war. This one brigade e
Shirley (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
r reports from Bermuda Hundreds on James river, at 11 o'clock last night, that the enemy (or a portion of them) was in full retreat; that their gunboats were near Shirley, on the Charles City shore, endeavoring to protect the retreat; that the Galena and two other gunboats had tired 200 shells into ranks, as they supposed, but that our forces had pressed the enemy hard, and he could hear fearfully rapid musketry firing until dark; that they were embarking their wounded above Shirley, and that many stragglers of all arms of the service were on the banks, without arms, also a large number of teams. S. S. Lee, Capt. C. S. N. All day yesterday, as w transports, and sailing vessels — the latter under the convoy of gunboats — were plying up and down the river with troops, which were embarked in the vicinity of Shirley. It is stated further that the banks of the river were lined with stragglers yesterday, and that they could be seen to rush eagerly to the transports as fast as
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