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West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
was a cessation of hostilities, and reached Baltimore en route to New York, at 5 A. M. on Sunday morning. They estimate that the Confederates lost six men to McClellan's one. These officers were released from the army on surgeons' certificates for illness. McClellan is reported as being in the best possible humor, and perfectly confident of success in his efforts to reduce the Confederate capital. Beauregard's army in Richmond. A correspondent of the New Pork Post, writing from West Point, June 27th, gives the following important information: Capt. T. S. Phelps, of the gunboat Corwin, intercepted a mail on the Mattaponi, on the 23d, which stated that Beauregard had arrived at Richmond with the main portion of his army; that- 30,000 men had been sent to Jackson, and that Jackson with these reinforcements, and the men he already had, would at once attack our right flank, about Mechanicsville, and get around into our rear, while Gen. Lee, with the main Confederate army,
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 9
open space, we saw an immense force; some drawn up in line of battle, and others marching and countermarching. These consisted of Porter's corps and McCall's Pennsylvania boys, who had yielded against their will. The Second day's battle. Two hours afterward the enemy came feeling their way through the woods, and finallythe front of the entire line, and was removed at 2 A. M., In frontier Conn. Rocker, Ramsey, and Edmund, possibility .... Four losses. Col. Black, of Pennsylvania, was killed, his head blown off by a shell. When we lost, Easton's battery, we lost its valuable commander besides. Ten guns were taken from us by a sudden fight to--(a distance of five miles, called White House. --Rep.) and on the centre, too, if necessary; but hold that position when reached, at all hazards." The Pennsylvania "Bucktails" were then in command of a Napoleon battery, and were mowing the Confederates down at a fearful rate with their destructive missiles. As fast a
White House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
300,000. The prisoners and wounded are obdurate, insert and ... action. Colonel Platt's regiment, it is said, did not suffer so severely as was reported by the first dispatches. This gentleman also reports that while he was in Baltimore a dispatch passed over the wires to the War Department, which, from his knowledge of the machinery and working of the telegraph, he believed to be "McClellan has commenced bombarding Richmond, and the city was burning" These officers left White-House at 11 A. M., on Saturday, at which time there was a cessation of hostilities, and reached Baltimore en route to New York, at 5 A. M. on Sunday morning. They estimate that the Confederates lost six men to McClellan's one. These officers were released from the army on surgeons' certificates for illness. McClellan is reported as being in the best possible humor, and perfectly confident of success in his efforts to reduce the Confederate capital. Beauregard's army in Richmond. A co
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
er — it would seem — in consequence of Gen. McClellan's right wing giving way. The "White House" being our great depot of provisions, etc., and the railroad there connecting our camps with the depot being broken up, it follows that General McClellan has but two alternatives left: 1st. To force his way to James river — in order, by connecting with the gunboats, to get something to eat. 2d. Rapid retreat further down the river, and if James river cannot be reached, retreat to York river and Hampton Roads. The News from the army. [From the same paper, fourth edition.] Some more light is thrown upon the army news in our special Washington dispatches (Fourth Edition.) The telegraph line connecting our depot with Gen. McClellan's army was broken Saturday, and hence, since that, we have nothing, and can have nothing from him directly. What happened afterwards, Saturday afternoon and Sunday, is among the things yet unknown here. The White House seems to have be<
Port Republic (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
) at 1,260. The loss of the enemy is reported on all hands as being much larger, their dead lying as one officer reported, who saw them in a ravine, piled up "as thick as flies on a bowl of sugar." The railroad from Savage Station to White-House I found well guarded, especially at Dispatch Station. On my arrival at White-House, I found that Gen. McClellan had ordered that all civilians should leave that place immediately. A train was (soon after we arrived there) sent up to DispWhite-House, I found that Gen. McClellan had ordered that all civilians should leave that place immediately. A train was (soon after we arrived there) sent up to Dispatch Station, but the engineer came back stating that the station was in the hands of the enemy, and he left his train and returned through the woods. Late in the afternoon of Friday Gen. McClellan's headquarters were removed from near the Chief a hominy back to near Savage Station, as also all the wagons, numbering thousands, ammunition commissary stores, forage, cattle — in short, everything — were all moved back to Savage's Station. General McClellan was on the battle field during
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
ollows that General McClellan has but two alternatives left: 1st. To force his way to James river — in order, by connecting with the gunboats, to get something to eat. 2d. Rapid retreat further down the river, and if James river cannot be reached, retreat to York river and Hampton Roads. The News from the army. [From the same paper, fourth edition.] Some more light is now in Confederate hands — and General McClellan must either retreat, in order to live, upon James river, to get a fresh and better hold, by means of the gunboats, upon Richmond — or else to Yorktown and Hampton Roads. There are gunboats on both rivers, both Pamunkey and James rivers, which will protect his river flank. The army now, it is clear from this dispatch, is to be supplied from Jameso be supplied from James river, upon which, doubtless, General McClellan is marching, whether in retreat, or in the line of Fort Darling and Wilton, seven miles below Richmond, remains to be se
Chickahominy (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
s as a successful strategic movement, into which the enemy have unwillingly been drawn, and which will soon result in the capture of Richmond and the entire Rebel army. The attack was made by the enemy in immense force, who crossed the Chickahominy river near the railroad, above Mechanicsville, on Thursday afternoon, and fought desperately, but were unable to drive our men back a single rod from their position, not withstanding that we had to contend, in an unequal combat, with nearly or quite ten to one. The only forces engaged on that day was McCall's Division which was lodged on the opposite side of a swampy ravine, about a mile and a half back from the Chickahominy river. The battle lasted from about 2 until 9 P. M., when the enemy drew off, renewing the attack at the break of day, and after several hours of hard fighting Gen. McCall's division was ordered to fall back. The soldiers, supposing that the order was given from fear of being overpowered, said they could
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 9
vered by the thick smoke which hung around the pieces and slowly drifted to leeward. Incidents. The Pennsylvania Reserve drove the attacking regiments of Jackson's command. To-day they were over powered by the same troops, reinforced. Syles's Regulars, called up, proved unequal to the task of stopping them, and Slocum's sibility of resisting or refusing McClellan's appeals for reinforcements? Later--12½ A. M.--Count de Paris took prisoner a Confederate Major, who belonged to Jackson's army. He said he had been in the Valley of the Shenandoah all winter, and came here yesterday with part of Jackson's army. The rest of it arrived this morningJackson's army. The rest of it arrived this morning. The whole of it was here. He said that in the attack on our right the Confederates had from sixty to eighty thousand troops. This will explain the enormous fire under which our men were borne down and swept away, precisely as some of the regiments were swept away at the Seven Pines. On the Confederate side, it is estimate
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
our part. The very anxious men and minds, who had been so eager to have this little "White House" turned into a hospital, will see that great matter is ended by the house being burnt up. Two thousand five hundred dollars will build another as good a house, and $700 re-supply all the furniture. What were General McClellan's intentions, after Sunday noon, are now to be guessed. The railroad, track, locomotive, are all now in Confederate hands — and General McClellan must either retreat, in order to live, upon James river, to get a fresh and better hold, by means of the gunboats, upon Richmond — or else to Yorktown and Hampton Roads. There are gunboats on both rivers, both Pamunkey and James rivers, which will protect his river flank. The army now, it is clear from this dispatch, is to be supplied from James river, upon which, doubtless, General McClellan is marching, whether in retreat, or in the line of Fort Darling and Wilton, seven miles below Richmond, remains to be seen
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
ews that all the public property at White House Landing had been embarked, and all the transports and vessels under charter ordered to sail under convoy to the Hampton Roads. The truth at last dawned upon the eyes of the dullest. McClellan had not soldiers enough to fight the enemy in front, and to maintain the base of his supplicting with the gunboats, to get something to eat. 2d. Rapid retreat further down the river, and if James river cannot be reached, retreat to York river and Hampton Roads. The News from the army. [From the same paper, fourth edition.] Some more light is thrown upon the army news in our special Washington dispatchellan must either retreat, in order to live, upon James river, to get a fresh and better hold, by means of the gunboats, upon Richmond — or else to Yorktown and Hampton Roads. There are gunboats on both rivers, both Pamunkey and James rivers, which will protect his river flank. The army now, it is clear from this dispatch, is to b
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