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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
Senator Clarke also makes an inquiry concerning the treatment to be demanded in behalf of private citizens of the Confederate States captured while making resistance to any attempt of the enemy to invade their domicils. The reply of the Secretary is as follows: Confederate States of America. War Department,Richmond, July 16th, 1862. Hon. John B. Clarke,C. S. Senate.Sir --I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 15th inst, and to reply that Partisan Rangers are a part of the Provisional army of the Confederate States, subject to all the regulations adopted for its government, and entitled to the same protection as prisoners of war; Partisan Rangers are in no respect different from troops of the line, defence, and if captured and confined by the enemy under such circumstances, they are entitled, as citizens of the Confederate States, to all the protection which that Government can afford, and among the measures to which it may be needful to resor
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 5
Partisan Rangers and private citizens captured by the enemy. In reply to a letter addressed to him by the Hon. John B. Clarke, Senator from Missouri, the Secretary of War makes an important explanation in relation to the status of the Partisan Rangers, and clearly states what will be expected in their behalf in the event of capture by the enemy. Senator Clarke also makes an inquiry concerning the treatment to be demanded in behalf of private citizens of the Confederate States captured wh at home are respected in their rights of person and property. In return for this privilege they are expected to take no part in hostilities unless called on by their Government. If, however, in violation of this usage, private citizens of Missouri should be oppressed and maltreated by the public enemy, they have unquestionably a right to take arms in their own defence, and if captured and confined by the enemy under such circumstances, they are entitled, as citizens of the Confederate Sta
John B. Clarke (search for this): article 5
Partisan Rangers and private citizens captured by the enemy. In reply to a letter addressed to him by the Hon. John B. Clarke, Senator from Missouri, the Secretary of War makes an important explanation in relation to the status of the Partisan Rangers, and clearly states what will be expected in their behalf in the event of capture by the enemy. Senator Clarke also makes an inquiry concerning the treatment to be demanded in behalf of private citizens of the Confederate States captured while making resistance to any attempt of the enemy to invade their domicils. The reply of the Secretary is as follows: Confederate States of America. War Department,Richmond, July 16th, 1862. Hon. John B. Clarke,C. S. Senate.Sir --I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 15th inst, and to reply that Partisan Rangers are a part of the Provisional army of the Confederate States, subject to all the regulations adopted for its government, and entitled to the sa
G. W. Randolph (search for this): article 5
o part in hostilities unless called on by their Government. If, however, in violation of this usage, private citizens of Missouri should be oppressed and maltreated by the public enemy, they have unquestionably a right to take arms in their own defence, and if captured and confined by the enemy under such circumstances, they are entitled, as citizens of the Confederate States, to all the protection which that Government can afford, and among the measures to which it may be needful to resort, is that of the less saltonis. We shall deplore the necessity of retaliation, as adding greatly to the miseries of the war without advancing its objects; and, therefore, we shall act with great circumspection, and only upon facts clearly ascertained; but if it is our only means of compelling the observance of the usages of civilized warfare, we cannot hesitate to resort to it when the proper time arrives. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, G. W. Randolph. Secretary of War.
July 16th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 5
ortant explanation in relation to the status of the Partisan Rangers, and clearly states what will be expected in their behalf in the event of capture by the enemy. Senator Clarke also makes an inquiry concerning the treatment to be demanded in behalf of private citizens of the Confederate States captured while making resistance to any attempt of the enemy to invade their domicils. The reply of the Secretary is as follows: Confederate States of America. War Department,Richmond, July 16th, 1862. Hon. John B. Clarke,C. S. Senate.Sir --I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 15th inst, and to reply that Partisan Rangers are a part of the Provisional army of the Confederate States, subject to all the regulations adopted for its government, and entitled to the same protection as prisoners of war; Partisan Rangers are in no respect different from troops of the line, except that they are not brigaded, and are employed oftener on detached service. They