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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 15
ad come down from Vicksburg The valorous little city was considered too hard a nut for it to crack. What its destination is was not known. Some of its officers, however, declared that it was Mobile; others thought Galveston, and still others James river. It must be doing something, but we can hardly see what use it can be of in James river. A few days ago there was great fear of an uprising of the people. Double sentries were put on duty, and some of the heaviest of the war vessels werJames river. A few days ago there was great fear of an uprising of the people. Double sentries were put on duty, and some of the heaviest of the war vessels were moored in front of the city. The purpose was to destroy it if the movement should be made. It was this fear that prompted the order of the Provost Marshal, declaring that three persons found together on the streets were equivalent to a riot; and several citizens were arrested and fined for violating it. On the 13th instant the fear of a riot was so great that signal flags from St. Patrick's Cathedral were used nearly all day. The same day a lady was arrested for displaying a Confederate ban
Madisonville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 15
o weeks ago there was a battle between some Texas guerrillas, near Opelousas, and a portion of Butler's forces. How it resulted is not exactly known, but cars returned to New Orleans laden with wounded Yankee soldiers. Butler sent reinforcements, and a portion of them had come back, making their way through swamps, and getting to their quarters in a very forlorn condition. Communication with the city, it was supposed, would be entirely cut off. Sailing vessels, accustomed to run to Madisonville, on the opposite side of the lake, are all retained there; and on the 14th inst, several persons were arrested for running this blockade and imprisoned. Trade was as dull as before. On Tuesday there were no clearances, and only two arrivals of small coasters. Several vessels in the employment of the Lincoln Government had come in from sea. There is a great deal of sickness among the invaders; but they conceal this by burying their dead at night, unless in the case of conspicuo
Opelousas (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 15
d for displaying a Confederate banner in honor of the victory in Virginia, and the movement among the citizens was so marked and defiant that the Provost Marshal exhibited considerable apprehension of the result. Gen. Van-Dorn is rebuilding the Manchaca bridge, about thirty six miles from New Orleans, and the Confederate pickets had driven in those of the enemy at Kenner, which is distant only twelve miles. Some two weeks ago there was a battle between some Texas guerrillas, near Opelousas, and a portion of Butler's forces. How it resulted is not exactly known, but cars returned to New Orleans laden with wounded Yankee soldiers. Butler sent reinforcements, and a portion of them had come back, making their way through swamps, and getting to their quarters in a very forlorn condition. Communication with the city, it was supposed, would be entirely cut off. Sailing vessels, accustomed to run to Madisonville, on the opposite side of the lake, are all retained there; and o
Pikesville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 15
the 14th inst, several persons were arrested for running this blockade and imprisoned. Trade was as dull as before. On Tuesday there were no clearances, and only two arrivals of small coasters. Several vessels in the employment of the Lincoln Government had come in from sea. There is a great deal of sickness among the invaders; but they conceal this by burying their dead at night, unless in the case of conspicuous officers. Yankee Depredations in "Union" Districts. Pikesville, Tenn., a town in the "Union" portion of Tennessee, was visited by the Yankees on the 14th inst. and "cleaned out." The Atlanta Confederacy says: Most of the prominent Southern men, profiting by the experience of their brethren at Jasper, left town. At 11 o'clock the pickets, numbering eighty men, entered with navy repeaters drawn, and dividing in the public square posted themselves on the various roads leading into town, some going up the valley road two miles or more. Soon the m
Jasper, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 15
Lincoln Government had come in from sea. There is a great deal of sickness among the invaders; but they conceal this by burying their dead at night, unless in the case of conspicuous officers. Yankee Depredations in "Union" Districts. Pikesville, Tenn., a town in the "Union" portion of Tennessee, was visited by the Yankees on the 14th inst. and "cleaned out." The Atlanta Confederacy says: Most of the prominent Southern men, profiting by the experience of their brethren at Jasper, left town. At 11 o'clock the pickets, numbering eighty men, entered with navy repeaters drawn, and dividing in the public square posted themselves on the various roads leading into town, some going up the valley road two miles or more. Soon the main body of cavalry came in, numbering about 1,400, after them came the infantry in wagons, about 600 strong, with four pieces of artillery--one a Parrot rifle gun. The officers quartered at the houses of the citizens ordering their dinner, wh
McMinnville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 15
t to the female hangers on about their camp; destroyed all the clothing of I. Pankey, deceased, which his wife had in a private room, and performed a thousand other acts of vandalism not easily enumerated. They arrested several citizens, but not getting hold of any they particularly wanted, turned them loose on their departure. They mixed with the negroes, and endeavored, with promises of good pay and freedom, to entice them off. They got away with nine, five of which were returned from McMinnville and Murfreesboro'. On Sunday evening, the 15th, they left, taking with them sixteen recruits for their army. These were men of a particular character, which does not contain philanthropy or patriotism enough to entitle them to the name of "citizen" in any country. This section is relieved of a class which are a nuisance in any community. The class which had been called "respectable Union men" is open in denouncing the conduct of the Federals, and even decent negroes are disgusted with
Kenner (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 15
a riot was so great that signal flags from St. Patrick's Cathedral were used nearly all day. The same day a lady was arrested for displaying a Confederate banner in honor of the victory in Virginia, and the movement among the citizens was so marked and defiant that the Provost Marshal exhibited considerable apprehension of the result. Gen. Van-Dorn is rebuilding the Manchaca bridge, about thirty six miles from New Orleans, and the Confederate pickets had driven in those of the enemy at Kenner, which is distant only twelve miles. Some two weeks ago there was a battle between some Texas guerrillas, near Opelousas, and a portion of Butler's forces. How it resulted is not exactly known, but cars returned to New Orleans laden with wounded Yankee soldiers. Butler sent reinforcements, and a portion of them had come back, making their way through swamps, and getting to their quarters in a very forlorn condition. Communication with the city, it was supposed, would be entirely
Galveston (Texas, United States) (search for this): article 15
will see that this order be enforced. By order of J. G. Parkhurst, Lieut. Col. 9th Mich. Inf'y, Comd'g, Military Governor of Murfreesboro'. W. A. Hull, Acting Adjutant. From New Orleans. The promised bombardment of Galveston has not taken place. On the 14th instant a skirmish took place near that place between a detachment of Federals who had landed and a body of Texan troops. The Yankees were forced to re-embark "promptly, " and then the Federal blockading sace." The mortar fleet had come down from Vicksburg The valorous little city was considered too hard a nut for it to crack. What its destination is was not known. Some of its officers, however, declared that it was Mobile; others thought Galveston, and still others James river. It must be doing something, but we can hardly see what use it can be of in James river. A few days ago there was great fear of an uprising of the people. Double sentries were put on duty, and some of the he
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 15
ticular character, which does not contain philanthropy or patriotism enough to entitle them to the name of "citizen" in any country. This section is relieved of a class which are a nuisance in any community. The class which had been called "respectable Union men" is open in denouncing the conduct of the Federals, and even decent negroes are disgusted with their treacherous, pilfering, and insulting conduct. Conversation with prisoners. A letter from "Before Richmond," in the Columbia (S. C.) Guardian, gives an interesting account of the writer's conversation with some Yankee prisoners. It says: We conversed with a wounded New York Zouave, who was shot through the leg — tibia shattered — and was a prisoner in our hands. He expressed himself perfectly satisfied with the results of the day to him, for his wound would release him from the remaining portion (ten months) of his term of service. He told us that he had received more personal kindness at the hands of the re
United States (United States) (search for this): article 15
to preach. In such a state of affairs we may imagine how heartily the approach of Forrest's cavalry was welcomed: Headq'rs Ninth Reg't Mich. Inf'y, Murfreesboro', June 17, 1862. Whereas, it is not the policy of the Government of the United States to encourage treason, nor to afford protection to its enemies, whether in open rebellion or in secret conspiracy against the laws therefore, it is ordered, that all traders, merchants, druggists, grocers, shop- keepers, school teachers, preachers, lawyers, and others, in the city of Murfreesboro', who solicit the patronage of the public, be required to subscribe to the oath of allegiance to the Government of the United States; and in case of their refusal to take the oath, that they be prohibited from practicing their trade or profession within the limits of the city of Murfreesboro'. Capt. O. C. Rounds, Provost Marshal, will see that this order be enforced. By order of J. G. Parkhurst, Lieut. Col. 9th Mich. Inf'y, C
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