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Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): article 10
y step appearing to them to diminish the faintest hope of extrication. Reports of the enemy's strength at Garlick's and Tunstall's were conflicting, but generally indicated a small number. Prisoners were captured at every step and including officers, soldiers, and negroes. The rear now became of as much interest and importance as the front, but the duties of rear guard devolving upon the Jeff. Davis Legion, with the howitzer attached, its conduct was entrusted to its commander, Lieut. Col., Martin, in whose judgment and skill I had entire confidence. He was not attacked, but at one time the enemy appeared in his rear bearing a flag of truce, and the party, twenty-five in number, bearing it, actually surrendered to his rear guard, so great was the consternation produced by our march. An assistant surgeon was also taken — he was en routs, and not in charge of the sick. Upon arriving opposite Garlick's. I ordered a squadron from the 9th Va. cavalry to destroy whatever could
South Anna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
of the expedition.--Two routes were before me, the one to return by Hanover C. H., the other to pass around through New Kent, taking the chances of having to swim the Chickahominy, and make a bold effort to cut the enemy's lines of communication. The Chickahominy was believed by my guides to be fordable near Forge Bridge. I was fourteen miles from Hanover C. H., which I would have to pass if I returned; the enemy had a much shorter distance to pass to intercept me there; besides, the South Anna river was impassable, which still further narrowed the chances of escape in that direction; the enemy, too, would naturally expect me to take that route. These circumstances led me to look with more favor to my favorite scheme, disclosed to you before starting, of passing around. It was only nine miles to Tunstall's Station, on the York River Railroad; and that point once passed, I felt little apprehension; beyond, the route was one of all others which I felt sure the enemy would never expe
White Oak Swamp (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
I felt little apprehension; beyond, the route was one of all others which I felt sure the enemy would never expect me to take. On that side of the Chicka hominy infantry could not reach me before crossing, and I felt able to whip any cavalry force that could be brought against me. Once on the Charles City side, I knew you would, when aware of my position, if necessary, order a diversion in my favor on the Charles City road, to prevent a move to intercept me from the direction of White Oak Swamp. Besides this the hope of striking a serious blow at a boastful and insolent foe, which would make him tremble in his shoes, made more agreeable the alternative I chose. In a brief and frank interview with some of my officers. I disclosed my views, but while none accorded a full assent, all assured me a hearty support in whatever I did. With an abiding trust in God, and with such guarantees of success as the two Lees and Martin, and their devoted followers, this enterprise I
Charles City (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
o Tunstall's Station, on the York River Railroad; and that point once passed, I felt little apprehension; beyond, the route was one of all others which I felt sure the enemy would never expect me to take. On that side of the Chicka hominy infantry could not reach me before crossing, and I felt able to whip any cavalry force that could be brought against me. Once on the Charles City side, I knew you would, when aware of my position, if necessary, order a diversion in my favor on the Charles City road, to prevent a move to intercept me from the direction of White Oak Swamp. Besides this the hope of striking a serious blow at a boastful and insolent foe, which would make him tremble in his shoes, made more agreeable the alternative I chose. In a brief and frank interview with some of my officers. I disclosed my views, but while none accorded a full assent, all assured me a hearty support in whatever I did. With an abiding trust in God, and with such guarantees of succes
Black Creek, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
d troops on board, and we prepared to attack it; the train swept off the obstructions without being thrown from the track, but our fire, delivered at only a few rods distance, either killed or caused to feign death every one on board, the engineer being one of the first victims from the unerring fire of Capt. Farley. It is fair to presume that a serious collision took place on its arrival at the White House, for it made extraordinary speed in that direction. The railroad bridge over Black creek was fired under the direction of Lieut. Burke, and it being now dark the burning of the immense wagon train and the extricating of the teams involved much labor and delay, and illuminated the country for miles. The roads at this point were far worse than ours, and the artillery had much difficulty in passing. Our march was finally continued by bright moonlight to Talleysville, where we halted three and a half hours for the column to close up At this point we passed a large hospital, of
Talleysville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
its arrival at the White House, for it made extraordinary speed in that direction. The railroad bridge over Black creek was fired under the direction of Lieut. Burke, and it being now dark the burning of the immense wagon train and the extricating of the teams involved much labor and delay, and illuminated the country for miles. The roads at this point were far worse than ours, and the artillery had much difficulty in passing. Our march was finally continued by bright moonlight to Talleysville, where we halted three and a half hours for the column to close up At this point we passed a large hospital, of one hundred and fifty patients. I deemed it proper not to molest the surgeons and attendants in charge. At 12 o'clock at night the march was continued, without incident, under the most favorable auspices, to Forge Bridge, (eight miles,) over the Chickahominy, where we arrived just at daylight. Lee, of the Ninth, by personal experiment, having found the stream not ford
Louisa Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
essential to success,) and was known to my command only as the actual march developed it. The force was quietly concentrated beyond the Chickahominy, near Kilby's Station, on the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad, and moved thence parallel to and to the left of that road. Scouts were kept far to the right to ascertain the enemy's whereabouts, and advanced guard flankers and rear guard to secure our column against surprise. I purposely directed my first day's march towards Louisa, so as to favor the idea of reinforcing Jackson, and camped just opposite Hanover Court-House, near Southaven bridge (R., F. and P. Railroad,) twenty-two miles from Richmond. Our noiseless bivouac was broken early next morning, and without flag or bugle sound we resumed our march, none but one knew whither. I however, immediately took occasion to make known my instructions and plans confidentially to the regimental commanders, so as to secure an intelligent action and co-operation in whate
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
ent my thanks are especially due for the diligent performance of the duties assigned them. They were as follows: First Lieut. John Esten Cook, Ordnance Officer, (my principal staff officer for the occasion,) 1st Lieut. C. Dabney, A. D. C., Rev. Mr. Longstreet, Capts. Farley, Towles Fitzhugh, and Mosby, rendered conspicuous and gallant service during the whole expedition. My escort, under Corp'l Hagan, are entitled individually to my thanks for their zeal and devotion to duty, particularly privates Carson, of the Jeff. Davis Legion, and Pierson, of the 4th Virginia cavalry. Herewith are submitted the reports of subordinate commanders, marked A, B and C, and a map, D, showing my route, and papers E, containing recommendations for promotion, and F, containing congratulatory orders published to the command upon its return. I have the honor to be, General. Your most obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Brig. Gen. com'g cavalry. Gen. R. E. Lee, com'g D. N. Virginia.
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
communication to New Bridge and vicinity. I proceeded, therefore, via Hanover Court-House, upon the route to Old Church. Upon reaching the vicinity of Hanover Court House, I found it in possession of the enemy; but very little could be as certained about the strength and nature of his force. I therefore sent Col. Fitz Lee's n left, were speedily burned and the march resumed whither! Here was the turning point of the expedition.--Two routes were before me, the one to return by Hanover C. H., the other to pass around through New Kent, taking the chances of having to swim the Chickahominy, and make a bold effort to cut the enemy's lines of communication. The Chickahominy was believed by my guides to be fordable near Forge Bridge. I was fourteen miles from Hanover C. H., which I would have to pass if I returned; the enemy had a much shorter distance to pass to intercept me there; besides, the South Anna river was impassable, which still further narrowed the chances of escape
Towles Fitzhugh (search for this): article 10
he Honorable Secretary of War, joined in the charge of the first squadron in gallant style, and subsequently, by his energy, skill, and activity, won the praise and admiration of all. To my Staff present my thanks are especially due for the diligent performance of the duties assigned them. They were as follows: First Lieut. John Esten Cook, Ordnance Officer, (my principal staff officer for the occasion,) 1st Lieut. C. Dabney, A. D. C., Rev. Mr. Longstreet, Capts. Farley, Towles Fitzhugh, and Mosby, rendered conspicuous and gallant service during the whole expedition. My escort, under Corp'l Hagan, are entitled individually to my thanks for their zeal and devotion to duty, particularly privates Carson, of the Jeff. Davis Legion, and Pierson, of the 4th Virginia cavalry. Herewith are submitted the reports of subordinate commanders, marked A, B and C, and a map, D, showing my route, and papers E, containing recommendations for promotion, and F, containing congr
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