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Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 12
e for sale. Nobody, except some ancient female, has used hair-dye since the call was made for all men "under 45 years of age." Gray hairs are not only honorable, they are fashionable. How suddenly some men grow old! Secret organization in Indiana. The grand jury of the United States for the district of Indiana have presented the secret organization of the Knights of the Golden Circle as a treasonable organization, one of the obligations being that if any of its members should be drafIndiana have presented the secret organization of the Knights of the Golden Circle as a treasonable organization, one of the obligations being that if any of its members should be drafted into the militia, they are to shoot over the head of any member of the organization in the rebel army who may exhibit the signal of membership. The grand jury say there are 15,000 members of the order in that State. The order was originated by some Southern fillibusters, and its purpose originally was to invade Mexico. As there is another field now opened by the rebellion, the members of the order will no doubt be found in the ranks of the guerrillas and their sympathizers. Arrests
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 12
a have presented the secret organization of the Knights of the Golden Circle as a treasonable organization, one of the obligations being that if any of its members should be drafted into the militia, they are to shoot over the head of any member of the organization in the rebel army who may exhibit the signal of membership. The grand jury say there are 15,000 members of the order in that State. The order was originated by some Southern fillibusters, and its purpose originally was to invade Mexico. As there is another field now opened by the rebellion, the members of the order will no doubt be found in the ranks of the guerrillas and their sympathizers. Arrests in Baltimore. The Baltimore Sun, of the 8th inst., says: William D. Parker was arrested yesterday, on the charge of making a pair of slippers on which was a Confederate flag. He was taken before Gen. Wool, and discharged after taking the oath. The slippers were confiscated. William H. Gaultree was arrested on
Pacific Ocean (search for this): article 12
ce to his rank he was brought to the hospital and laid among the dead. His friends prepared to give him a decent burial, and were about to carry the body out, when the Colonel rolled over, and in tones more like those of a man drunk than dead, called out, "Ben, John, where is my whiskey flask? " The Burning of the Golden Gate. In commenting upon the causes of the destruction of the steamship Golden Gate, the New York Times says: The disaster was wholly unexpected. In the Eastern Pacific half the terrors of sea travel are disarmed. In July there are no frightful gales and tremendous seas to imperil the strength of the vessel. Unless the pilot wander from a well defined course, there are no reefs nor shoals where he may be suddenly sunk. So plain and secure has been the journey from San Francisco to Panama, that the voyager has come to regard it as less formidable than the crossing of an inland ferry. But from the one danger of which no vessels is free, even when
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 12
n commenting on the above the New York Express uses the following language: We answer, in the first place, by asking what right — war right or constitutional right — has the Government to make war upon loyal States like Kentucky, Missouri, Maryland, Delaware, Tennessee in part, Virginia in part, or upon loyal slaveholders or slaveholding States anywhere! The right does not exist, either according to the laws of war or the Constitution of the United States, which President, Judges, Cabinetamination made, she was allowed to go on parole, the testimony to be submitted to the Provost Marshal in the meantime. Her friends, she said, were in Richmond, but her husband in the Federal army. Miscellaneous. Hon. Thos. F. Bowie, of Maryland, arrested some time since on the charge of disloyalty, appeared before the Provost Marshal, at Washington, on the 8th inst., in obedience to a parole given, and was discharged on giving a further parole not to give aid and comfort to the Confede
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 12
From the North. The subjoined extracts are called from the latest Northern papers received at this office: A negro regiment to be Raised in Rhode Island--Gov. Sprague's proclamation. The Providence (R. I) correspondent of the New York Tribune, under date of August 5th, writes: The war is begun. The bitter and trd allowing the great slaveholders' rebellion to become what it has been so long struggling toward becoming — a gigantic suicide. These are its words: State of Rhode Island and Providence, Plantations, Adj't General's Office, Providence. August 4. General Orders, No. 36.--The 6th regiment, ordered by the Secretary of Wrations and equipments on requisition. Our colored fellow-citizens are reminded that the regiment from this State will constitute a part of the quota from Rhode Island, and it is expected they will respond with real and spirit to this sall. The Commander-in-Chief will lead them into the field, and will share with them, i
Fairfield county (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 12
The United States authorities in Newark, N. J., have seized a silver cup which had been sent to an engraver in that city to be marked as follows: "Stonewall Jackson. L. 1862" It is not known whether it is intended for some Ledge or Lodges, or whether it is a present for some child in Dixie the latter is probably the case. The subject is, however, under investigation by the proper authorities. Strong language — Lincoln Denounced. At a meeting recently held in Fairfield county. Ohio, Dr. Olds, a Democratic candidate for Congress, made a speech, during which the following language was used by him in reference to Lincoln's emancipation scheme: "I denounce Lincoln as a tyrant. He has perjured his soul. He may imprison me, but I will still cry tyrant. I denounce these acts of oppression as foul acts of perjury against the Constitution." "And now, my fellow Democrts, I am going to have a vision, which, if it were not a vision, might be treason, but w
San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): article 12
the Golden Gate. In commenting upon the causes of the destruction of the steamship Golden Gate, the New York Times says: The disaster was wholly unexpected. In the Eastern Pacific half the terrors of sea travel are disarmed. In July there are no frightful gales and tremendous seas to imperil the strength of the vessel. Unless the pilot wander from a well defined course, there are no reefs nor shoals where he may be suddenly sunk. So plain and secure has been the journey from San Francisco to Panama, that the voyager has come to regard it as less formidable than the crossing of an inland ferry. But from the one danger of which no vessels is free, even when its ribs and their coverings are of iron, the boats of the Pacific Steamship Company are not exempt. The Golden Gate was burned at sea. Nearly one-fourth of her passengers perished. There was every chance to escape, had means of escape been provided. Herein, as the case stands at present, there is a melancholy ba
United States (United States) (search for this): article 12
swear that I will support and defend the Constitution and Government of the United States against all their enemies or opposers, whether domestic or foreign, and wiltwithstanding. That I renounce all allegiance to the so-called Confederate States of America, and that I will not in any manner give any aid, advice, comfort, or intelligence to the enemies of the United States. And further, that I will use all the means in my power to assist the Government of the United States in the United States in the restoration of the Union, and the execution and enforcement of the laws now in force, made in pursuance of the Constitution thereof. And further, that I do this¼ cents a pound. A silver cup for Stonewall Jackson captured. The United States authorities in Newark, N. J., have seized a silver cup which had been sent en grow old! Secret organization in Indiana. The grand jury of the United States for the district of Indiana have presented the secret organization of the K
Newburyport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 12
ty of the meagre telegraphic dispatch hurried across the continent. It is sincerely to be hoped the particulars to come hereafter will mitigate the severity of the present verdict. Sickness caused from "Exposure to a draft." The Newburyport (Mass.) Herald says it never knew it so sickly before at Newburyport as it is now. The disease affects only males between the ages of 18 and 45. The cases are very distressing. Several have occurred where men have nearly lost their sight; they sNewburyport as it is now. The disease affects only males between the ages of 18 and 45. The cases are very distressing. Several have occurred where men have nearly lost their sight; they say that bad as they hate the Confederates, they could not see one across the street, and spectacles are in demand. Some are badly ruptured, but were never troubled by it till last week; and others are lame. This disease affects the mind as well as the body. They see war in a different light than formerly, and some of the foremost Abolitionists begin to think that they would be willing to abandon the negro if the war could only be closed at once. This is a terrible disease and widely spread.
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): article 12
men were all Democrats. They see that the outbreak of a slaveholders' war has changed essentially the relations of slavery to the State, and they guide their minds, not by the old party traditions, or according to circumstances which have forever passed away, but by the light of existing events. We of the North can no doubt whip the rebels by arms; we can drive them out of Richmond into the cotton States; we can pursue them through the thousand swamps of the cotton States into the Gulf of Mexico; it would take time and money and life to do so; but we could do it all beyond a peradventure. But the Union would not be thereby restored. The same elements of discord would still exist; the same fends would break out, and no permanent peace or permanent harmony would be possible until the respective social systems of the North and South are rendered homogeneous by the extinction of the only difference between them. We must go on fighting for ever in this kind of desultory civil war,
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