hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Westover (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 8 2 Browse Search
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Quantrel 8 0 Browse Search
Hampton (Virginia, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
McClellan 7 1 Browse Search
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 26, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 467 total hits in 239 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
rly destroyed. Dr. M. was sent for by one of the Generals to estimate and receive compensation for his property which was seized for the use of the army; but learning that the oath of allegiance was one of the conditions, promptly told the officer that he gave up all, and, more than that, would give up his life, before he would take it. Desertions were numerous, and one Yankee soldier paid as high as $40 in gold for an old suit of citizens' clothes, in which to pass his picket. On the first of the four very hot days during the stay of the army, the sick list was 365, and by the fourth day it ran up to 1,068. The country is literally dotted with Yankee graves, many of them hardly covering the bodies. From one he saw the nose of a corpse protruding, and from another a pair of legs encased in boots. Some of the gunboats are still lying off Westover, and on one of them was a son of Mrs. James Selden, who is in the U. S. Navy. The commander of the fleet sent word ashore a da
Later from the North. New York papers of the 20th contain some news of interest. They contain dates from Europe to the 9th inst. Lord Palmerston had made a speech at a banquet in Sheffield, in which, while deploring the suffering in that district, he reiterated the intention of the Government not to interfere in the American war. He thought interference would only make matters worse. Mr. Roebuck, M. P., also made a speech, in which he predicted that America would be divided into five parts. The war, he thought, was a useless waste of blood, and not waged for the extermination of slavery. The sales of cotton in Liverpool on the 9th were 5,000 bales. The New York Herald has dispatches from Washington to the effect that "movement of immense importance" would be made by Pope's army in a day or two. The guerrillas at work in Missouri. Sr. Louis, Aug. 13. --A fight took place west of Warrensburg on Friday last, in which three thousand guerrillas, under Quantrel and Hug
n on the Peninsula is evident, and between Hampton and Yorktown. As there are 20 acres covered by hospitals at Hampton a railroad is now being completed between there and Fortress Monroe. Miscellaneous. A Fredericksburg correspondent of the Herald, under date of August 17, says Gen. Burnside has inaugurated the assumption of his command in that vicinity with prompt measures to repress the command which in progress between Richmond and the rebel sympathizers. On the morning of the 15th, the following Marylanders, who were endeavoring to make their way to Richmond, were captured: A. Gives, M. E. Haines, W. H. Archer, John L. Welch, G. R. Hodges, W. S. Winder, M. Thompson, H. Barch, E. K, Goldsborough, Lloyd Lownders. Albert Mudd, George Mudd and G. C. Burch. T. M. Hodges and two others. escaped. Dispatches from New Orleans announce the death of Connnander Thomas Wainwright, of the U. S. sloop of war Hartford. Old Abe has just made the following appointments: Brigad
the 18th and Cincinnati papers of the 19th have been received. They furnish the following summary of news. Several new points in Kentucky have been occupied by rebel guerrillas Richmond 23 miles from Lexington is now occupied by three thousand rebels. Eighty Confederates, supposed to be on their way to join Morgan, a ere captured at Mammoth Cave. Bodies of cavalry, supposed to be the advance of a large force, have appeared at London and Somerset Bull Nelson was at Nashville on the 18th. Trains are running through from Nashville on the Chattanooga road. A large body of rebels, collected in Jackson Mo., threaten, an attack on Kansas City. The Kansas militia has been ordered out en masse. At the ovation given to Col. Corcoran at Washington. Col. Wilcox declared that the rebellion was stronger now than ever. Cassius M. Clay has been assigned to an important command west of the Mississippi. The Emperor of Russia expects to visit the United States.
o others. escaped. Dispatches from New Orleans announce the death of Connnander Thomas Wainwright, of the U. S. sloop of war Hartford. Old Abe has just made the following appointments: Brigadier General H. G. Wright, of the United States Engineers, to be a Major-General; Col. Michael Corcoran, of the 69th New York Militia, to be a Brigadier-General; Col Orlando N. Wilcox, of the 2d Michigan Volunteers, to be a Brigadier General; Brigadier General G. W. Collom, not confirmed by the Senate by an accidental emission, is reappointed to be a Brigadier-General. The body of Brigadier General Thos. Williams, who was killed at Baton Rouge, reached New York last Monday. It will be carried to Newburg, New York, where the family of deceased reside. He was shot through the heart by a Minnie ball. The sales of cotton in New York on Tuesday, the 19th, amounted to 400 bales of middling uplands at 46½@47 cents. Exchange dull at 127@127½. Gold opened at 115, but declined to 114¾
August 13th (search for this): article 8
make matters worse. Mr. Roebuck, M. P., also made a speech, in which he predicted that America would be divided into five parts. The war, he thought, was a useless waste of blood, and not waged for the extermination of slavery. The sales of cotton in Liverpool on the 9th were 5,000 bales. The New York Herald has dispatches from Washington to the effect that "movement of immense importance" would be made by Pope's army in a day or two. The guerrillas at work in Missouri. Sr. Louis, Aug. 13. --A fight took place west of Warrensburg on Friday last, in which three thousand guerrillas, under Quantrel and Hughes used up eight hundred State militia, commanded by Major Emory S. Foster, mortally wounding the latter. The Union loss in killed, wounded and missing was three hundred. The rebel loss was near five hundred. The rebels captured two cannon. Sr. Louis, Aug. 19.--The city was full of vague rumors yesterday that a fight had occurred on Friday last near Lexingt
August 17th (search for this): article 8
A large baggage train is now at Hampton. Gen. Burnside is now at Fortress Monroe, and there is some talk of his taking command of the army now in command of Gen. McClellan. That a portion of this army must remain on the Peninsula is evident, and between Hampton and Yorktown. As there are 20 acres covered by hospitals at Hampton a railroad is now being completed between there and Fortress Monroe. Miscellaneous. A Fredericksburg correspondent of the Herald, under date of August 17, says Gen. Burnside has inaugurated the assumption of his command in that vicinity with prompt measures to repress the command which in progress between Richmond and the rebel sympathizers. On the morning of the 15th, the following Marylanders, who were endeavoring to make their way to Richmond, were captured: A. Gives, M. E. Haines, W. H. Archer, John L. Welch, G. R. Hodges, W. S. Winder, M. Thompson, H. Barch, E. K, Goldsborough, Lloyd Lownders. Albert Mudd, George Mudd and G. C. Burc
August 18th (search for this): article 8
F. Switzler, Secretary of State for Arkansas, left yesterday for Helena, Arkansas. Colonels McGill and Guitar have been promoted to Brigadier Generals of the enrolled militia for the recent battles with the guerrillas. Lexington, Mo., August 18. --Brigadier-General Lane has reached here with reinforcements, rendering the safety of the place certain. The gunboat Mercier is also here, which can do valuable service in case of an attack. Some of Quantrel's general orders have beenchattels and property taken for the use of the Southern army. These orders emanated from the commanding officers recognized as regular soldiers by the rebel Secretary of War. M'Clellan's avant courier at the Fortress. Fortress Monroe, Aug. 18. --The avant courier of the Army of the Potomac arrived at Hampton this morning, in the shape of Hunt's Artillery Reserve, and immediately went into camp, for two or three days rest. Fitz John Porter's corps is now at Newport News, or rapi
August 19th (search for this): article 8
would be made by Pope's army in a day or two. The guerrillas at work in Missouri. Sr. Louis, Aug. 13. --A fight took place west of Warrensburg on Friday last, in which three thousand guerrillas, under Quantrel and Hughes used up eight hundred State militia, commanded by Major Emory S. Foster, mortally wounding the latter. The Union loss in killed, wounded and missing was three hundred. The rebel loss was near five hundred. The rebels captured two cannon. Sr. Louis, Aug. 19.--The city was full of vague rumors yesterday that a fight had occurred on Friday last near Lexington between about 200 Federal troops and the guerrillas of Quantrel, Hays, and Hughes's gang, in which the Federal were defeated; but no official advices have yet been received. Passengers by the Pacific Railroad, however, bring reports that a fight did occur on Friday at Lone Jack. Jackson county, about twenty miles southwest of Lexington, between parts of Colonels Phillips's and Critten
August 19th (search for this): article 6
Five dollars reward. --Ran away, from my house, on Tuesday, the 19th day of August, my negro boy Alfred. The said boy is of a light copper color; a slight scar on the chin; is very quick spoken, and is about 12 years of age; he had on when he left my house a blue checked coat, white pants, and light wool hat. The said boy was hired to me by Thomas Davis. The above reward will be paid for his apprehension and delivery either to Thos. Davis, on corner of Baker and St. James streets, or to me, on 1st, between Duval and Baker streets. au 23--3t* James R. Thom.
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...