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Warwick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
at Fort Grafton, nearly in front of Yorktown. The right flank was defended by the fortifications at the month of Warwick river, and at Mulberry Island Point, and the redoubts extending from the Warwick to James river. Intervening between tes too weak to attempt the defence of this line, I was compelled to prepare to receive the enemy on a second line, on Warwick river. This line was incomplete in its preparations, owing to the fact that a thousand negro laborers that I had engaghave been attended with great loss. The Warwick line, upon which we rested, may be briefly described, as follows: Warwick river rises very near York river, and about a mile and a half to the right of Yorktown. Yorktown and Redoubts Nos. 4, ains and flanked by rifle-pits, for the left of the line, until, at the commencement of the military road, it reaches Warwick river, here, a sluggish and boggy stream, twenty or thirty yards wide, and running through a dense wood fringed by swamps.
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
a front from Yorktown to Minor's farm of twelve miles, and from the latter place to Mulberry Island Point of one and a half miles. I was compelled to place in Gloucester Point, Yorktown, and Mulberry Island, fixed garrisons amounting to six thousand men, my whole force being eleven thousand (11,000,; so that it will be seen that the balance of the line, embracing a length of thirteen miles, was defended by about five thousand men. After two reconnaissances in great force from Fortress Monroe and Newport News, the enemy, on the 3d of April, advanced and took possession of Harwood's Mills. He had advanced in two heavy columns--one along the old York road, and the other along the Warwick road, and, on the 5th of April. appeared simultaneously along the whole front of our line, from Minor's farm to Yorktown. I have no accurate data upon which to base an exact statement of his force, but, from various sources of information, I was satisfied that I had before me the ene
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
official report. Headq'rs Department of the Peninsula; Lees Farm, May 3, 1862. Gen. S. Cooper. Adj't and Insp'r Gen'l, C. S. A: General — Deeming it of vital importance, for a time, Yorktown, on York river, and Mulberry Island on James river, and to keep the enemy in check by an intervening line, until the authorities might take such steps as should be deemed necessary to meet a serious advance of the enemy in the Peninsula, I felt compelled to dispose my forces in such a manner and Wormley's Creek and terminating at Fort Grafton, nearly in front of Yorktown. The right flank was defended by the fortifications at the month of Warwick river, and at Mulberry Island Point, and the redoubts extending from the Warwick to James river. Intervening between the two mills was a wooded country about two miles in extent. This wooded line, forming the centre, needed the defence of infantry in a sufficient force to prevent any attempt on the part of the enemy to break th
Minor (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
ore I could reorganize the laborers for the engineers. Keeping, then, only small bodies of troops at Harwood's and Young's Mills, and at Ship Point, I distributed my remaining forces along the Warwick line, embracing a front from Yorktown to Minor's farm of twelve miles, and from the latter place to Mulberry Island Point of one and a half miles. I was compelled to place in Gloucester Point, Yorktown, and Mulberry Island, fixed garrisons amounting to six thousand men, my whole force bevanced and took possession of Harwood's Mills. He had advanced in two heavy columns--one along the old York road, and the other along the Warwick road, and, on the 5th of April. appeared simultaneously along the whole front of our line, from Minor's farm to Yorktown. I have no accurate data upon which to base an exact statement of his force, but, from various sources of information, I was satisfied that I had before me the enemy's Army of Potomac, under the command of Gen. McClellan,
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
eninsula; Lees Farm, May 3, 1862. Gen. S. Cooper. Adj't and Insp'r Gen'l, C. S. A: General — Deeming it of vital importance, for a time, Yorktown, on York river, and Mulberry Island on James river, and to keep the enemy in check by an intervening line, until the authorities might take such steps as should be deemed neceft flank was defended by elaborate fortifications at ship Point, connected by a broken line of redoubts, crossing the heads of the various ravines emptying into York river and Wormley's Creek and terminating at Fort Grafton, nearly in front of Yorktown. The right flank was defended by the fortifications at the month of Warwickr part would have been attended with great loss. The Warwick line, upon which we rested, may be briefly described, as follows: Warwick river rises very near York river, and about a mile and a half to the right of Yorktown. Yorktown and Redoubts Nos. 4, and 5, united by long curtains and flanked by rifle-pits, for the left
Mulberry Island (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
eneral Magruder's official report. Headq'rs Department of the Peninsula; Lees Farm, May 3, 1862. Gen. S. Cooper. Adj't and Insp'r Gen'l, C. S. A: General — Deeming it of vital importance, for a time, Yorktown, on York river, and Mulberry Island on James river, and to keep the enemy in check by an intervening line, until the authorities might take such steps as should be deemed necessary to meet a serious advance of the enemy in the Peninsula, I felt compelled to dispose my forces ining forces along the Warwick line, embracing a front from Yorktown to Minor's farm of twelve miles, and from the latter place to Mulberry Island Point of one and a half miles. I was compelled to place in Gloucester Point, Yorktown, and Mulberry Island, fixed garrisons amounting to six thousand men, my whole force being eleven thousand (11,000,; so that it will be seen that the balance of the line, embracing a length of thirteen miles, was defended by about five thousand men. After tw
Ship Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
f this line, I was compelled to prepare to receive the enemy on a second line, on Warwick river. This line was incomplete in its preparations, owing to the fact that a thousand negro laborers that I had engaged in fortifying were taken from me and discharged by superior orders, in December last, and a delay of nine weeks consequently occurred before I could reorganize the laborers for the engineers. Keeping, then, only small bodies of troops at Harwood's and Young's Mills, and at Ship Point, I distributed my remaining forces along the Warwick line, embracing a front from Yorktown to Minor's farm of twelve miles, and from the latter place to Mulberry Island Point of one and a half miles. I was compelled to place in Gloucester Point, Yorktown, and Mulberry Island, fixed garrisons amounting to six thousand men, my whole force being eleven thousand (11,000,; so that it will be seen that the balance of the line, embracing a length of thirteen miles, was defended by about five
Rochambeau Village (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
cribed, as follows: Warwick river rises very near York river, and about a mile and a half to the right of Yorktown. Yorktown and Redoubts Nos. 4, and 5, united by long curtains and flanked by rifle-pits, for the left of the line, until, at the commencement of the military road, it reaches Warwick river, here, a sluggish and boggy stream, twenty or thirty yards wide, and running through a dense wood fringed by swamps. Along this river are five dams--one at Wynne's Mill, and one at Lee's Mill, and three constructed by me. The effect of these dams is to back up the water along the course of the river, so that for nearly three-fourths of its distance its passage is impracticable for either artillery or infantry. Each of these dams is protected by artillery, and extensive earthworks for infantry. After eleven days of examination the enemy seems, very properly, to have arrived at the conclusion that Dam No. 1, the centre of our line, was the weakest point in it, and hence, on
Gloucester Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
With twenty-five thousand, I don't believe it could have been broken by any force the enemy could have brought against it. Its two flanks were protected by the "Virginia" and the works on one side, and the fortifications at Yorktown and Gloucester Point on the other. Finding my forces too weak to attempt the defence of this line, I was compelled to prepare to receive the enemy on a second line, on Warwick river. This line was incomplete in its preparations, owing to the fact that ip Point, I distributed my remaining forces along the Warwick line, embracing a front from Yorktown to Minor's farm of twelve miles, and from the latter place to Mulberry Island Point of one and a half miles. I was compelled to place in Gloucester Point, Yorktown, and Mulberry Island, fixed garrisons amounting to six thousand men, my whole force being eleven thousand (11,000,; so that it will be seen that the balance of the line, embracing a length of thirteen miles, was defended by about f
McClellan (search for this): article 8
, from Minor's farm to Yorktown. I have no accurate data upon which to base an exact statement of his force, but, from various sources of information, I was satisfied that I had before me the enemy's Army of Potomac, under the command of Gen. McClellan, with the exception of the two corps d' armee of Banks and McDowell respectively, forming an aggregate number of certainly not less than 100,000 men, since ascertained to have been 120,000. On every portion of my lines, he attacked us wiently the enemy massed heavier bodies of troops, and again approached the stream. It was now evident that a most serious and energetic attract, in large force, was being made to break our centre, under, it is believed, the immediate eye of McClellan himself; but Brigadier General Howell Cobb, who was in command at that point, forming, the 2d Louisiana, 7th and 8th Georgia, of Col. Anderson's brigades, the 15th and 24th Georgia, and Cobb's Legion, in line of battle on our front, received th
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