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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Handsome affair at Williamsburg. On Tuesday morning last a cavalry force, consisting of a portion of the "Holcombe Legion," of South Carolina, two companies of Virginia and one of Georgia cavalry, in all numbering some 370 men, made a brilliant dash upon the enemy at Williamsburg, in which they succeeded in inflicting pretty severe punishment on the nest of Yankee thieves quartered at that place. About sunrise our scouts came up with those of the enemy one mile from the town, on the Centreville road. A brisk skirmish ensued, in which the Yankees were routed, leaving several of their number dead on the field. Our forces followed quickly after them, and soon entered the town, where they encountered some eight hundred of the foe, who fired upon them from behind houses and other concealed points. The fight, which was a severe one, lasted about fifteen minutes, when the enemy broke and ran in the direction of their camps, about a mile and a half below Williamsburg. Between t
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
Handsome affair at Williamsburg. On Tuesday morning last a cavalry force, consisting of a portion of the "Holcombe Legion," of South Carolina, two companies of Virginia and one of Georgia cavalry, in all numbering some 370 men, made a brilliant dash upon the enemy at Williamsburg, in which they succeeded in inflicting pretty severe punishment on the nest of Yankee thieves quartered at that place. About sunrise our scouts came up with those of the enemy one mile from the town, on the Centreville road. A brisk skirmish ensued, in which the Yankees were routed, leaving several of their number dead on the field. Our forces followed quickly after them, and soon entered the town, where they encountered some eight hundred of the foe, who fired upon them from behind houses and other concealed points. The fight, which was a severe one, lasted about fifteen minutes, when the enemy broke and ran in the direction of their camps, about a mile and a half below Williamsburg. Between th
open field. Our forces were immediately drawn up in line to attack them, and the order given to charge. This was too much for the timid Yankees, and after a volley or two from their carbines they fled from the field in confusion, leaving more dead and wounded to the care of our men. They were pursued to their camps, which they quickly deserted, and only stopped when they had found shelter in Fort Magruder, some distance below Williamsburg. Our forces were under the command of Colonel Shingler, of the "Holcombe Legion." Our loss in the fight was too killed and five or six wounded; that of the enemy not less than sixty killed and wounded. Besides these, our forces captured 110 Yankees and 16 contrabands; also, 71 horses and some 20 or 25 carbines. Among the prisoners was one Colonel and the Military Governor of Williamsburg, named Campbell. The prisoners captured were brought to this city last night under charge of Serg'ts Thorne and Dickens, of the Legion, and are now
y drawn up in line to attack them, and the order given to charge. This was too much for the timid Yankees, and after a volley or two from their carbines they fled from the field in confusion, leaving more dead and wounded to the care of our men. They were pursued to their camps, which they quickly deserted, and only stopped when they had found shelter in Fort Magruder, some distance below Williamsburg. Our forces were under the command of Colonel Shingler, of the "Holcombe Legion." Our loss in the fight was too killed and five or six wounded; that of the enemy not less than sixty killed and wounded. Besides these, our forces captured 110 Yankees and 16 contrabands; also, 71 horses and some 20 or 25 carbines. Among the prisoners was one Colonel and the Military Governor of Williamsburg, named Campbell. The prisoners captured were brought to this city last night under charge of Serg'ts Thorne and Dickens, of the Legion, and are now snugly quartered in the Libby prison.
drawn up in line to attack them, and the order given to charge. This was too much for the timid Yankees, and after a volley or two from their carbines they fled from the field in confusion, leaving more dead and wounded to the care of our men. They were pursued to their camps, which they quickly deserted, and only stopped when they had found shelter in Fort Magruder, some distance below Williamsburg. Our forces were under the command of Colonel Shingler, of the "Holcombe Legion." Our loss in the fight was too killed and five or six wounded; that of the enemy not less than sixty killed and wounded. Besides these, our forces captured 110 Yankees and 16 contrabands; also, 71 horses and some 20 or 25 carbines. Among the prisoners was one Colonel and the Military Governor of Williamsburg, named Campbell. The prisoners captured were brought to this city last night under charge of Serg'ts Thorne and Dickens, of the Legion, and are now snugly quartered in the Libby prison.
y drawn up in line to attack them, and the order given to charge. This was too much for the timid Yankees, and after a volley or two from their carbines they fled from the field in confusion, leaving more dead and wounded to the care of our men. They were pursued to their camps, which they quickly deserted, and only stopped when they had found shelter in Fort Magruder, some distance below Williamsburg. Our forces were under the command of Colonel Shingler, of the "Holcombe Legion." Our loss in the fight was too killed and five or six wounded; that of the enemy not less than sixty killed and wounded. Besides these, our forces captured 110 Yankees and 16 contrabands; also, 71 horses and some 20 or 25 carbines. Among the prisoners was one Colonel and the Military Governor of Williamsburg, named Campbell. The prisoners captured were brought to this city last night under charge of Serg'ts Thorne and Dickens, of the Legion, and are now snugly quartered in the Libby prison.