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September 12th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 3
Confederate Congress. Friday,Sept. 12TH, 1862. Senate--The Senate was opened with prayer at noon by the Rev. J. D. Coulling, of the M. E. Church. Mr. Brown, of Miss, offered the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Committee on Military Affairs be instructed to inquire whether persons holding commissions in the army of the Confederate States are employed as clerks in the Departments, and especially in the offices of the Quartermaster and Commissary General, in this city; what pay and allowances such clerks receive; whether they are paid as clerks or commissioned officers, or both; and whether the duties performed by such commissioned officers, as clerks, may not be as well performed by persons taken from civil life, and at less cost to the Government. Mr. Oldham, of Texas, offered the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Committee on Finance be instructed to inquire and report what legislation is necessary, if
n came from a source in which he placed implicit confidence, and that although there was a law to punish officers for transcending their authority, that law would scarcely be enforced where the only parties, who could convict, were to the power of the tyrant. Messrs. Clay, of Ala., Phelan, Wigfall, Yancey, and Hunter, opposed the resolution, and Mr. Clark favored it in a debate of some length. House of Representatives --House met at 12 o'clock. Journal of yesterday read. Mr. Boteler, of Va., presented a memorial from the citizens of Shenandoah county, asking the exemption of millers from conscription. Referred to Military Committee. Mr. Hilton, of Fla., from the Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the message of the President communicating the dispatches from Gen. Lee relative to the recent victories and the resolution of yesterday in relation to the movement of our armies across the Potomac, reported the following substitute for said resolution
ule, now confined by the enemy in Fort Warren, with amendments, so that the resolution would request the President to "use all the means of his power to effect the liberation (instead of exchange,) of Pierre Soule, and all other persons illegally arrested by the enemy."--The resolution was laid on the table for the present. Mr. Sparrow, from the same committee, reported back the resolutions of inquiry into the authenticity and authority, if authentic, of certain reported executions by Gen. Bragg, of soldiers, without court-martial, and asked to be discharged from the further consideration of the subject. The reason for this request was, that the Senator (Mr. Orr) who had offered the resolution had written a communication to the committee, indicating the necessity of calling for persons and papers, which would place the subject before the committee in a form which they did not deem it expedient to consider it. The committee being discharged, Mr. Orr, of S. C., moved that
Confederate Congress. Friday,Sept. 12TH, 1862. Senate--The Senate was opened with prayer at noon by the Rev. J. D. Coulling, of the M. E. Church. Mr. Brown, of Miss, offered the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Committee on Military Affairs be instructed to inquire whether persons holding commissions in the army of the Confederate States are employed as clerks in the Departments, and especially in the offices of the Quartermaster and Commissary General, in this city; what pay and allowances such clerks receive; whether they are paid as clerks or commissioned officers, or both; and whether the duties performed by such commissioned officers, as clerks, may not be as well performed by persons taken from civil life, and at less cost to the Government. Mr. Oldham, of Texas, offered the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Committee on Finance be instructed to inquire and report what legislation is necessary, if
he reason for this request was, that the Senator (Mr. Orr) who had offered the resolution had written a communication to the committee, indicating the necessity of calling for persons and papers, which would place the subject before the committee in a form which they did not deem it expedient to consider it. The committee being discharged, Mr. Orr, of S. C., moved that the resolution be referred to a special committee of three, with authority to call for persons and papers. Mr. Burnett, of Ky., objected. The army was acting under law, and whenever an officer disobeyed that law, he was amenable to it, whatever his position. With that law the matter should be left and not brought here to be investigated before a committee. Mr. Orr replied that the information upon which he based his resolution came from a source in which he placed implicit confidence, and that although there was a law to punish officers for transcending their authority, that law would scarcely be e
e left and not brought here to be investigated before a committee. Mr. Orr replied that the information upon which he based his resolution came from a source in which he placed implicit confidence, and that although there was a law to punish officers for transcending their authority, that law would scarcely be enforced where the only parties, who could convict, were to the power of the tyrant. Messrs. Clay, of Ala., Phelan, Wigfall, Yancey, and Hunter, opposed the resolution, and Mr. Clark favored it in a debate of some length. House of Representatives --House met at 12 o'clock. Journal of yesterday read. Mr. Boteler, of Va., presented a memorial from the citizens of Shenandoah county, asking the exemption of millers from conscription. Referred to Military Committee. Mr. Hilton, of Fla., from the Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the message of the President communicating the dispatches from Gen. Lee relative to the recent victories and t
t law, he was amenable to it, whatever his position. With that law the matter should be left and not brought here to be investigated before a committee. Mr. Orr replied that the information upon which he based his resolution came from a source in which he placed implicit confidence, and that although there was a law to punish officers for transcending their authority, that law would scarcely be enforced where the only parties, who could convict, were to the power of the tyrant. Messrs. Clay, of Ala., Phelan, Wigfall, Yancey, and Hunter, opposed the resolution, and Mr. Clark favored it in a debate of some length. House of Representatives --House met at 12 o'clock. Journal of yesterday read. Mr. Boteler, of Va., presented a memorial from the citizens of Shenandoah county, asking the exemption of millers from conscription. Referred to Military Committee. Mr. Hilton, of Fla., from the Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the message of the Presi
the officers and men under his command. Mr. Lyons of Va., moved to amend the second resolution by striking out the words "advance our standards into the territory of the enemy." Mr. Miles, of S. C., was rather surprised at this motion of the gentleman from Virginia. He had thought that if there was any one thing more than another upon which the people of the Confederate States were united, it was a change of policy from the defensive to the aggressive in conducting the war. Mr. Conrad, of La., concurred with the gentleman from Virginia, who made the motion which had caused discussion. He thought the resolution, in its present form, transcended the appropriate duty of Congress. Mr. Foote called the question, which was sustained; when Mr. Goode, of Va., called for the ayes and does on the motion of Mr. Lyons, when it was defeated by ayes 29, noes 61. The Speaker announced that, the morning hour having expired, the business in order was the special order of
J. D. Coulling (search for this): article 3
Confederate Congress. Friday,Sept. 12TH, 1862. Senate--The Senate was opened with prayer at noon by the Rev. J. D. Coulling, of the M. E. Church. Mr. Brown, of Miss, offered the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Committee on Military Affairs be instructed to inquire whether persons holding commissions in the army of the Confederate States are employed as clerks in the Departments, and especially in the offices of the Quartermaster and Commissary General, in this city; what pay and allowances such clerks receive; whether they are paid as clerks or commissioned officers, or both; and whether the duties performed by such commissioned officers, as clerks, may not be as well performed by persons taken from civil life, and at less cost to the Government. Mr. Oldham, of Texas, offered the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Committee on Finance be instructed to inquire and report what legislation is necessary, if
tion being again open for discussion, the House was detained until half past 3 o'clock without coming to a vote, the opposition being confined to the second resolution. On a test vote, however, it was adopted by ayes, 63; noes, 15.--The resolutions, as they came from the committee, were agreed to by a decided majority of the House. Mr. Miles, of S. C., moved, as a substitute for the title of these resolutions, the following: Joint resolutions in relation to the late victories, and the crossing of the Potomac by the Army of Northern Virginia. To this Mr. Jones, of Tenn., moved to amend the title by adding the words, and "Congressional General Order, No. 1," so as to make it read, "Joint resolutions in relation to the late victories and the crossing of the Potomac by the Army of Northern Virginia." Upon this amendment, Mr. Farrow, of S. C., called the ayes and noes, which was agreed to, and the vote resulted — ayes 13, noes 56. On motion, the House then adjourned.
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