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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 16, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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George W. Munford (search for this): article 1
By the Governor of Virginia — a proclamation. --Whereas a vacancy has occurred in the House of Delegates of Virginia, occasioned by the resignation of John G. Steger, one of the Delegates from the city of Richmond, therefore, the Sergeant of the said city is hereby required to cause an election to be held at the several places of voting prescribed by law in said city, on Monday, the twenty-second day of the present month, (September,) for a Delegate to supply the vacancy. Given under my hand, as Governor, and under the Seal of the Commonwealth, this tenth day of September, 1862, and in the eighty-seventh year of the Commonwealth. John Letcher. By the Governor. George W. Munford. se 12--td Sec'y of the Commonwealth.
John Letcher (search for this): article 1
By the Governor of Virginia — a proclamation. --Whereas a vacancy has occurred in the House of Delegates of Virginia, occasioned by the resignation of John G. Steger, one of the Delegates from the city of Richmond, therefore, the Sergeant of the said city is hereby required to cause an election to be held at the several places of voting prescribed by law in said city, on Monday, the twenty-second day of the present month, (September,) for a Delegate to supply the vacancy. Given under my hand, as Governor, and under the Seal of the Commonwealth, this tenth day of September, 1862, and in the eighty-seventh year of the Commonwealth. John Letcher. By the Governor. George W. Munford. se 12--td Sec'y of the Commonwealth.
John G. Steger (search for this): article 1
By the Governor of Virginia — a proclamation. --Whereas a vacancy has occurred in the House of Delegates of Virginia, occasioned by the resignation of John G. Steger, one of the Delegates from the city of Richmond, therefore, the Sergeant of the said city is hereby required to cause an election to be held at the several places of voting prescribed by law in said city, on Monday, the twenty-second day of the present month, (September,) for a Delegate to supply the vacancy. Given under my hand, as Governor, and under the Seal of the Commonwealth, this tenth day of September, 1862, and in the eighty-seventh year of the Commonwealth. John Letcher. By the Governor. George W. Munford. se 12--td Sec'y of the Commonwealth.
September 10th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
By the Governor of Virginia — a proclamation. --Whereas a vacancy has occurred in the House of Delegates of Virginia, occasioned by the resignation of John G. Steger, one of the Delegates from the city of Richmond, therefore, the Sergeant of the said city is hereby required to cause an election to be held at the several places of voting prescribed by law in said city, on Monday, the twenty-second day of the present month, (September,) for a Delegate to supply the vacancy. Given under my hand, as Governor, and under the Seal of the Commonwealth, this tenth day of September, 1862, and in the eighty-seventh year of the Commonwealth. John Letcher. By the Governor. George W. Munford. se 12--td Sec'y of the Commonwealth.
September (search for this): article 1
By the Governor of Virginia — a proclamation. --Whereas a vacancy has occurred in the House of Delegates of Virginia, occasioned by the resignation of John G. Steger, one of the Delegates from the city of Richmond, therefore, the Sergeant of the said city is hereby required to cause an election to be held at the several places of voting prescribed by law in said city, on Monday, the twenty-second day of the present month, (September,) for a Delegate to supply the vacancy. Given under my hand, as Governor, and under the Seal of the Commonwealth, this tenth day of September, 1862, and in the eighty-seventh year of the Commonwealth. John Letcher. By the Governor. George W. Munford. se 12--td Sec'y of the Commonwealth.
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
there are so many civilians who will answer the purpose just as well, and who, when a battle takes place, have nothing to do but to look on. Troops are constantly pouring into this city from all points both north and west of this. Several Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois regiments have arrived and crossed the river to day. Among them were several regiments of cavalry and two batteries of light articled. We now have in and around the city a force sufficient to reaped any enemy which can be brought he river. A dispatch from Point Pleasant to the Military Committee at Gallipolis, says that the contending forces are in sight of each other, and that the rebels are but nine hundred strong, and that a battle is imminent. Gov. Morton, of Ind., has ordered all the male citizens between the ages of 18 and 45 residing in the border counties, to organize themselves into military companies, to repel the invasion. A dispatch from Gallipolis, Ohio, (a town on the river,) dated the 7th,
Poolesville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
Federal "green backs," whether counterfeit or good is not known. These cattle were all driven towards the Potomac, rendering it probable that the whole invasion is only for foraging purposes, and to furnish supplies for the main body of the rebel army on the other side of the Potomac. The purchases made in Frederick are said to have been paid for partly in Federal money, but mostly in Virginia and South Carolina money. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer writing from Poolesville, Md., on the 9th differs a little from the above. He says: They are still sending all the cattle over into Virginia, but are not paying Treasury notes, as at first stated; but, where a man declines Confederate money, give him receipts. Some few who are considered Union men, because they come from the North and do not own niggers, received no receipts or money, and had cornfields swept away, cattle driven off, and were nearly ruined. Many who have taken the oath of allegiance threw op
Racine (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): article 1
eral Colonel, Rathbone. The dispatch adds: On Wednesday morning Jenkins's forces entered Revenswood, Va., and on the same evening crossed the Ohio river at Buffington's Island, and came down to Racine, Ohio, where they killed one man and wounded two others, and stole twelve horses. They then recrossed the river at Wolf's Bar, and encamped for the night. The people were rising to resist further attempts at invasion by the rebels. A later report says the rebels are crossing at Racine, and are coming down on both sides of the river. A dispatch from Point Pleasant to the Military Committee at Gallipolis, says that the contending forces are in sight of each other, and that the rebels are but nine hundred strong, and that a battle is imminent. Gov. Morton, of Ind., has ordered all the male citizens between the ages of 18 and 45 residing in the border counties, to organize themselves into military companies, to repel the invasion. A dispatch from Gallipolis, O
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 1
hen he comes, in proper style. In this respect General Wallace has shown that he has a proper appreciation of a soldier and his duties, and he says it would be madness to wear out the men who must do the fighting, with hard work, while there are so many civilians who will answer the purpose just as well, and who, when a battle takes place, have nothing to do but to look on. Troops are constantly pouring into this city from all points both north and west of this. Several Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois regiments have arrived and crossed the river to day. Among them were several regiments of cavalry and two batteries of light articled. We now have in and around the city a force sufficient to reaped any enemy which can be brought against it by the rebels. Of course, I am not allowed to give the exact numbers, but there need now be no fear for the safety of Cincinnati; for in the event of a fight, which seems imminent, our troops will surely win a victory; and should the enemy learn of
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
his own request." General McDowell, whose division was almost destroyed by our army, has met Pope's fate. He has been "temporarily" relieved by Gen. Reno. Gen. Banks is still lying at Willard's Hotel, Washington, from his wound. The draft in Pennsylvania and several other States has been postponed till the 20th inst. The war tax has raised the rates of everything. In Philadelphia the price of beer has been increased, causing much dissatisfaction among the Germans. A flag of truce visit tond that the front door is impassable, those supplies which he is collecting in Maryland will be required to feed his army while recrossing this desert of Northern Virginia back to Richmond. That he contemplates a winter sojourn in Maryland or Pennsylvania we cannot for a moment suppose; but that, before returning to Richmond, he will make a desperate effort by strategy and by hard fighting to get into Washington we have very little reason to doubt. Let him be defeated in this last and most des
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