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Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 4
the general welfare. Respectfully, your obedient servant, B. Macoffin. The contrast. [From the Albany (N. Y.) Atlas.] At a public meeting in New Hampshire, Senator Hale of that State is reported to have said: "I may be ordered to Fort Warren for the expression I am about to make, but I do not hesitate to declare that there is nothing that can parallel the exhibition of ability, vigor and resource shown by the Confederate Government, except the incapacity and imbecility of our own." Senator Hale has not yet been sent to Fort Warren, and will not be. That place is reserved for Democrats, who, at some former day, may have offended a Cabinet officer, and who are badgered with false charges of disloyalty now. What is the secret of the contrast between rebel efficiency and governmental helplessness? When the Confederate Government was organized, the opposition was at once associated in the administration. Stephens, who ran with Douglas, was made Vice President. A Cabi
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): article 4
ed and very able successor my best wishes for the success of his administration, in the hope he will be more successful than I have been in protecting all classes of the citizens of my native and still dearly beloved State in their rights under the Constitution and laws, to which I have faithfully endeavored to adhere, and in promoting the general welfare. Respectfully, your obedient servant, B. Macoffin. The contrast. [From the Albany (N. Y.) Atlas.] At a public meeting in New Hampshire, Senator Hale of that State is reported to have said: "I may be ordered to Fort Warren for the expression I am about to make, but I do not hesitate to declare that there is nothing that can parallel the exhibition of ability, vigor and resource shown by the Confederate Government, except the incapacity and imbecility of our own." Senator Hale has not yet been sent to Fort Warren, and will not be. That place is reserved for Democrats, who, at some former day, may have offended a Cabinet o
Cape May (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 4
Northern News. We make the following extracts from our Northern files: Narrow escape of two Federal regiments The New York Times states that the 13th and 25th New York regiments, about 1,300 strong, narrowly escaped being lost at sea while on their way, in the steamer Baltic, from Norfolk to New York. They had been stationed at Suffolk, but their time being up they left for home, shipping at Norfolk. The ship went aground about fifty miles South of Cape May, and was gotten off, leasing badly. Minute guns were field, and blue lights sent up at night. Meanwhile, the troops had been detailed into gangs and reliefs of 20 men each, and, under the direction of their officers, worked incessantly at the pumps, the coal hole, and the baggage gangways. In these tolls they were cheered and assisted by the crew of the ship, who, with the zeal and skill of American seamen, gave themselves no respite all night long Hundreds of tons of coal, baggage, and commissary stores, wer
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
xtreme. Each man had to be lowered into the boats along side by ropes, and then as each boat was filled, the living freight was conveyed to the smaller vessels. The crews of the Baltic and the schooners manned all the boats they could launch, and the number of these alone rendered the transfer possible, as the sea, was high and brought, and each loating required a tedious time.--One schooner took 229 of the Twenty fifth and fifty of the Thirteenth and sailed, our informant thought, to Fortress Monroe, the other took 200 of the Twenty fifth, and was to make for Cape May Breakwater, where she was to send a boat ashore and telegraph to Philadelphia for assistance to the Baltic. After this the Baltic made her way safely to New York, but one of the small vessels that took soldiers from her had not been heard of at last accounts. Horace Greeley to Abraham Lincoln again The editor of the New York Tribune seems disposed to continue his ill natured correspondence with Mr. Linco
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 4
imary an act of self-defence as to relieve those who would serve and save it from chatted servitude to those who are wading through seas of blood to subvert and destroy it. Future generations will with difficulty realize that there could have been hesitation on this point. Sixty years of general and boundless subserviency to the slave power do not adequately explain it. Mr. President, I beseech you to open your eyes to the fact that the devotees of slavery everywhere — just as much in Maryland as in Mississippi, in Washington, as in Richmond — are to-day your enemies and the implacable foes of every effort to reestablish the national authority by the discomfiture of its assailants. Their President is not Abraham Lincoln, but Jefferson Davis. You may draft them to serve in the war; but they will only fight under the rebel flag. There is not in New York to-day a man who really believes in slavery loves it, and desires its perpetuation, who heartily desires the crushing out of re
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
caped being lost at sea while on their way, in the steamer Baltic, from Norfolk to New York. They had been stationed at Suffolk, but their time being up they left for home, shipping at Norfolk. The ship went aground about fifty miles South of Capversaries. Union troops near Norfolk. The New York Times states that the Union force at and between Norfolk and Suffolk amounts to between 8,000 and 9,000 men, consisting of the 3d and 4th New York, the 1st Delaware, and the 31st illinois infantry regiments, and the 11th Pennsylvania cavalry, all stationed at Suffolk. The 13th Illinois has seen severe service, and the 11th Pennsylvania cavalry, under Lieutenant Colonel Spear, is spoken of very highly. In addition to these, there were near Suffolk the New York Mounted Ritles, Capt. Howard's battery of the 4th United States artillery, and the three regiments composing Gen. Ferry's brigade, which has just arrived from the Peninsula, where it formed part of General McClellan's lat
e to traitors to the protection of our flag have been assented, wounded, and murdered by soldiers of the Union--unpunished and unrebuked by your General Commanding — to prove that it is your duty to take action in the premises — action that will cause the law to be proclaimed and obeyed wherever your authority or that of the Union is recognized as paramount. The rebellion is strengthening, the national cause imperiled, by every hour's delay to strike treason this staggering blow. When Fremont proclaimed freedom to the slaves of rebels, you constrained him to modify his proclamation into rigid accordance with the terms of the existing law. It was your clear right to do so. I now ask of you conformity to the principle so sternly enforced upon him, I ask you to instruct your Generals and Commodores that no loyal person — certainly none willing to render service to the national cause — is henceforth to be regarded as the slave of any traitor. While no rightful Government was ever
Laggart Generals (search for this): article 4
t some former day, may have offended a Cabinet officer, and who are badgered with false charges of disloyalty now. What is the secret of the contrast between rebel efficiency and governmental helplessness? When the Confederate Government was organized, the opposition was at once associated in the administration. Stephens, who ran with Douglas, was made Vice President. A Cabinet of all parties was constructed. When Cabinet officers were proved insufficient, they were dismissed. Laggart Generals were cashiered, deserters shot, peculators punished. The South was organized on a war basis. President Lincoln, on the other hand, made up his Cabinet out of the dead-wood of the Chicago Convention. Seward, Chase, Cameron, Bates, were all his rivals, and enemies of each other — all disappointed and rejected men! These worn-out politicians had their followers to provide for; and they fed them upon the plunder of the treasury — upon the commissariat of the army — upon the spoils o<
rong enough to sweep away the cobweb system of terrorism and threats which seemed to be held over the heads of the people. The security of the public is in the loyalty and intelligence of that party, and upon that party the Government can at all times rely. The President has been far less embarrassed by Democrats than by Republicans. Mr. Seymour concluded by saying that the Democracy were confident in their cause, for they were battling for the Union, the Constitution, and the laws. Magoffin's letter of resignation. The following is the letter of the Governor of Kentucky, resigning his position as Governor of Kentucky. Weary of being longer a witness to all manner of tyranny perpetrated by the might of the strong arm of the military, he resigns his position and entrusts the cares of the Government to a more pliant tool of the Washington cabinet: Executive Department, August 16, 1862, To the Senate and House by Representatives. Having felt for a long time that
above them as at any time, if we had men in charge of public affairs capable of handling there resources. There, and there alone, the contrast lies between ourselves and our adversaries. Union troops near Norfolk. The New York Times states that the Union force at and between Norfolk and Suffolk amounts to between 8,000 and 9,000 men, consisting of the 3d and 4th New York, the 1st Delaware, and the 31st illinois infantry regiments, and the 11th Pennsylvania cavalry, all stationed at Suffolk. The 13th Illinois has seen severe service, and the 11th Pennsylvania cavalry, under Lieutenant Colonel Spear, is spoken of very highly. In addition to these, there were near Suffolk the New York Mounted Ritles, Capt. Howard's battery of the 4th United States artillery, and the three regiments composing Gen. Ferry's brigade, which has just arrived from the Peninsula, where it formed part of General McClellan's late army. At Norfolk there were the 99th New York and a Wisconsin regiment.
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