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Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
them and the straggling soldiers. I saw the cloud of dust, but could not for a moment divine its meaning, until I saw the horsemen come dashing back. Fortunately, no injury was done, though a ball pierced the hat of one of Jackson's aids. I heard in Williamsport — his residence — that Capt. Russell was wounded in the mouth. Capt. J. M. Payne and a doctor, whose name I did not learn, lost their horses. They were taking dinner at a hotel. The enemy fled before us from Martinsburg to Harper's Ferry; we pursued; a part of Longstreet's forces captured the Maryland Heights; others got possession of the Loudoun Heights, and we surrender them. Thus the words of Gen. Johnston were literally verified, that Harper's Ferry would prove a man-trap to any party who might attempt to hold it. Their troops were living on half rations. A large number of stolen negroes were also captured, estimated at from five to eight hundred. Having filled our haversacks with three days rations of crackers, J
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
From the army. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Frederick Co. Va., 9 miles from Winchester, Sept. 22d, 1862. You should have heard from me are this, of the stirring events just transacted in this part of the State, but for an unfortunate wound received in the battle of Sharpsburg, September 17th, on account of which I have since been so situated as to be unable to write until at present. The particulars of the march through Maryland are now so well known to every one that it is useless to repeat. One circumstance, however, I have not jet seen in print, and will mention. Jackson's corps marched from Frederick via Boonesboro' to Williamsport. Just in sight of Boonesboro', the whole army stopped to camp and cook rations. As usual, several soldiers made their way on to town in search of something good to eat. No danger was apprehended. Gen. Jackson and staff rode on in front, not dreaming of danger; but just as they had reached the centre of the town Capt. Rus
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
made a dash upon them and the straggling soldiers. I saw the cloud of dust, but could not for a moment divine its meaning, until I saw the horsemen come dashing back. Fortunately, no injury was done, though a ball pierced the hat of one of Jackson's aids. I heard in Williamsport — his residence — that Capt. Russell was wounded in the mouth. Capt. J. M. Payne and a doctor, whose name I did not learn, lost their horses. They were taking dinner at a hotel. The enemy fled before us from Martinsburg to Harper's Ferry; we pursued; a part of Longstreet's forces captured the Maryland Heights; others got possession of the Loudoun Heights, and we surrender them. Thus the words of Gen. Johnston were literally verified, that Harper's Ferry would prove a man-trap to any party who might attempt to hold it. Their troops were living on half rations. A large number of stolen negroes were also captured, estimated at from five to eight hundred. Having filled our haversacks with three days ratio
Boonsboro (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
present. The particulars of the march through Maryland are now so well known to every one that it is useless to repeat. One circumstance, however, I have not jet seen in print, and will mention. Jackson's corps marched from Frederick via Boonesboro' to Williamsport. Just in sight of Boonesboro', the whole army stopped to camp and cook rations. As usual, several soldiers made their way on to town in search of something good to eat. No danger was apprehended. Gen. Jackson and staff rode Boonesboro', the whole army stopped to camp and cook rations. As usual, several soldiers made their way on to town in search of something good to eat. No danger was apprehended. Gen. Jackson and staff rode on in front, not dreaming of danger; but just as they had reached the centre of the town Capt. Russell's company made a dash upon them and the straggling soldiers. I saw the cloud of dust, but could not for a moment divine its meaning, until I saw the horsemen come dashing back. Fortunately, no injury was done, though a ball pierced the hat of one of Jackson's aids. I heard in Williamsport — his residence — that Capt. Russell was wounded in the mouth. Capt. J. M. Payne and a doctor, whose na
hundred. Having filled our haversacks with three days rations of crackers, Jackson's corps started, a little after twelve o'clock on the night of the surrender, directly for Shepherdstown, waded the river, and proceeded at once into the heaviest of the fight on the extreme left of our lines. The second brigade was that evening exposed to a severe cannonade from the enemy for an hour. Capt. Kelly, who at that time commanded the brigade, was slightly wounded and retired from the field. Capt. Dobyns, of the 42d, was wounded in the arm, besides eight or ten others, whose names I did not learn. The command of the brigade then devolved upon Capt. Penn, of the 42d We lay all night on the field, and the morning of the bloodiest day of American history still found us in the same position. We were in an uncommonly exposed position, on a ridge just between two depressions, one about 100 yards in front, and the other about the same distance in rear of our line. The firing commenced early i
on half rations. A large number of stolen negroes were also captured, estimated at from five to eight hundred. Having filled our haversacks with three days rations of crackers, Jackson's corps started, a little after twelve o'clock on the night of the surrender, directly for Shepherdstown, waded the river, and proceeded at once into the heaviest of the fight on the extreme left of our lines. The second brigade was that evening exposed to a severe cannonade from the enemy for an hour. Capt. Kelly, who at that time commanded the brigade, was slightly wounded and retired from the field. Capt. Dobyns, of the 42d, was wounded in the arm, besides eight or ten others, whose names I did not learn. The command of the brigade then devolved upon Capt. Penn, of the 42d We lay all night on the field, and the morning of the bloodiest day of American history still found us in the same position. We were in an uncommonly exposed position, on a ridge just between two depressions, one about 100
f one of Jackson's aids. I heard in Williamsport — his residence — that Capt. Russell was wounded in the mouth. Capt. J. M. Payne and a doctor, whose name I did not learn, lost their horses. They were taking dinner at a hotel. The enemy fled before us from Martinsburg to Harper's Ferry; we pursued; a part of Longstreet's forces captured the Maryland Heights; others got possession of the Loudoun Heights, and we surrender them. Thus the words of Gen. Johnston were literally verified, that Harper's Ferry would prove a man-trap to any party who might attempt to hold it. Their troops were living on half rations. A large number of stolen negroes were also captured, estimated at from five to eight hundred. Having filled our haversacks with three days rations of crackers, Jackson's corps started, a little after twelve o'clock on the night of the surrender, directly for Shepherdstown, waded the river, and proceeded at once into the heaviest of the fight on the extreme left of our lines.
ations. As usual, several soldiers made their way on to town in search of something good to eat. No danger was apprehended. Gen. Jackson and staff rode on in front, not dreaming of danger; but just as they had reached the centre of the town Capt. Russell's company made a dash upon them and the straggling soldiers. I saw the cloud of dust, but could not for a moment divine its meaning, until I saw the horsemen come dashing back. Fortunately, no injury was done, though a ball pierced the hat of one of Jackson's aids. I heard in Williamsport — his residence — that Capt. Russell was wounded in the mouth. Capt. J. M. Payne and a doctor, whose name I did not learn, lost their horses. They were taking dinner at a hotel. The enemy fled before us from Martinsburg to Harper's Ferry; we pursued; a part of Longstreet's forces captured the Maryland Heights; others got possession of the Loudoun Heights, and we surrender them. Thus the words of Gen. Johnston were literally verified, that H
rrender, directly for Shepherdstown, waded the river, and proceeded at once into the heaviest of the fight on the extreme left of our lines. The second brigade was that evening exposed to a severe cannonade from the enemy for an hour. Capt. Kelly, who at that time commanded the brigade, was slightly wounded and retired from the field. Capt. Dobyns, of the 42d, was wounded in the arm, besides eight or ten others, whose names I did not learn. The command of the brigade then devolved upon Capt. Penn, of the 42d We lay all night on the field, and the morning of the bloodiest day of American history still found us in the same position. We were in an uncommonly exposed position, on a ridge just between two depressions, one about 100 yards in front, and the other about the same distance in rear of our line. The firing commenced early in the morning, even before light.--About sunrise it commenced along our lines. From the first our men began to fall from their long- range guns. The ene
Andrew Johnston (search for this): article 1
as done, though a ball pierced the hat of one of Jackson's aids. I heard in Williamsport — his residence — that Capt. Russell was wounded in the mouth. Capt. J. M. Payne and a doctor, whose name I did not learn, lost their horses. They were taking dinner at a hotel. The enemy fled before us from Martinsburg to Harper's Ferry; we pursued; a part of Longstreet's forces captured the Maryland Heights; others got possession of the Loudoun Heights, and we surrender them. Thus the words of Gen. Johnston were literally verified, that Harper's Ferry would prove a man-trap to any party who might attempt to hold it. Their troops were living on half rations. A large number of stolen negroes were also captured, estimated at from five to eight hundred. Having filled our haversacks with three days rations of crackers, Jackson's corps started, a little after twelve o'clock on the night of the surrender, directly for Shepherdstown, waded the river, and proceeded at once into the heaviest of the
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