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Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
ting; for while he was engaged at Munfordsville Buell moved up to Cave City, and made a movement on the Glasgow road. There no longer remained an egress for him. What was more natural, then, than to avoid him, and push forward to some point by which he could reach Central Kentucky, and find the only available outlet from the State east of Glasgow? On a careful examination of the map it will be found that it is only by getting north of Muldraugh's Hills, and taking the turnpike road to Danville, Stanford, and London, that Bragg's large force can get out of the State at Cumberland Gap. It is surmised that Bragg is trying to avail himself of this outlet, and he proposes making an effort to destroy this army in the meantime. Should he approach this city by the Bardstown road, and fail in his attempt to destroy us before Buell comes up, he could shy off by the Shelbyville road to Frankfort, and thence via Lexington, Richmond, and London, to East Tennessee. Should Buell and this arm
Bardstown (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 7
ky, and find the only available outlet from the State east of Glasgow? On a careful examination of the map it will be found that it is only by getting north of Muldraugh's Hills, and taking the turnpike road to Danville, Stanford, and London, that Bragg's large force can get out of the State at Cumberland Gap. It is surmised that Bragg is trying to avail himself of this outlet, and he proposes making an effort to destroy this army in the meantime. Should he approach this city by the Bardstown road, and fail in his attempt to destroy us before Buell comes up, he could shy off by the Shelbyville road to Frankfort, and thence via Lexington, Richmond, and London, to East Tennessee. Should Buell and this army pursue him, a few hours start or of forced marches would enable Bragg to put the Kentucky river between him and his enemies; and should he find that Buell was moving to keep him north of the Kentucky river he could easily escape as Humphrey Marshall entered. I am satisfied, m
Jackson Crossing (Texas, United States) (search for this): article 7
miration of the South, by telegraphing, exulting, to Davis, that " the army of Richmond is safe" In fact, his retreat over the Potomac was a master piece, and in which he combined and Jackson for the envelopment of Harper's Ferry, while he checked our columns at Hagerstown Heights and Crampton Gap, is probably the best achievement of the war. The rapidity of his movements, as well as the perfect on his combinations, contrasts strangely with the marches of McClellan; and when we behold Jackson crossing and recrossing the Potomac, at long distances, in four days we look with surprise at the tardiness of our early movement toward the enemy by a series of marches that barely averaged four or five miles a day. Does any one suppose for an instant that Pope, who found sixteen fighting days out of thirty-five between Centreville and the Rapidan, would not have found Lee at the end of fifty miles of a well-known road in less than ten days. Or can any one believe that Napoleon, who is so honor
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 7
f Lincoln, through his proclamation suspending habeas corpus, does not succeed in keeping down the public will. The. "Neatness" of rebel retreat — Scenes after the battle — the dead. A correspondent of the New York Tribune, writing from Sharpsburg, on the 19th inst., says: Notwithstanding the rapidity with which the chase was conducted, we have caught but few of the running rebels. Seven hundred will, I think, cover the entire number. Nearly all their wounded in the battle of Wedat victories are composed of. On the other hand, the retreat of the rebels was an ably managed affair, and reflects great credit upon Gen. Lee. "It is, " said a gentleman to me, "Corinth repeated, only much more neatly." In passing through Sharpsburg, although upon a double-quick, the rebel army seemed struck with the appearance of the village. You will remember it was exposed for several hours on Wednesday evening to furious shelling by Burnside's artillery. The terrible effects of his s
New England (United States) (search for this): article 7
n in real estate. That caused the advance in stocks, which was in fact only apparent, and which is not an increase in the value of the stocks, but only a mode of balancing the new difference between paper and specie incident to the rise in the price of gold. But what caused the rise in gold? A dozen different causes, all working together and assisting each other. In the first place, there was the President's emancipation proclamation. Then the secret revolutionary meetings of the New England Governors, culminating in the conclave at Altoona, which we reported yesterday, had something to do with it. The pause of McClellan's army on the Potomac helped it along. The nomination of Wadsworth — a radical disunionist — had its weight. The knowledge that there are at least two members of the Cabinet who are practically in favor of disunion, and zealously working for that object, did not lack its influence. All these and other similar facts, supporting and corroborating each other,
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 7
nsue all the same.--Neither will it be possible for him to refuse any deposits over six millions; for upon such a refusal the gold already deposited with him would be immediately withdrawn. Thus the occasion of the excitement must remain, and behind the occasion lie the causes. Evidently Wall, street does not believe the assertions of the radicals that the war will be over in thirty days that Greeley's nine hundred thousand reserve of abolitionists will enlist, and that the highways of Massachusetts will swarm with Governor Andrew's promised recruits, in consequence of the President's emancipation proclamation. Wall street is practical, and cannot rely upon prophecies and predictions. Neither does it fail to see that the revolutionary Governors are obstructing recruiting, delaying the draft, and holding back soldiers already enlisted, because of some foul conspiracy and diabolical intrigue, which has already borne fruit in crippling McClellan, by depriving him of reinforcements an
Kentucky River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 7
l comes up, he could shy off by the Shelbyville road to Frankfort, and thence via Lexington, Richmond, and London, to East Tennessee. Should Buell and this army pursue him, a few hours start or of forced marches would enable Bragg to put the Kentucky river between him and his enemies; and should he find that Buell was moving to keep him north of the Kentucky river he could easily escape as Humphrey Marshall entered. I am satisfied, more over, that a desperate effort is being made to destroy BrKentucky river he could easily escape as Humphrey Marshall entered. I am satisfied, more over, that a desperate effort is being made to destroy Bragg's army, and that there are high hopes of accomplishing it. General Nelson has ordered the work on the fortifications at Louisville to be discontinued. He declared that the rebels could shell the city from a dozen different positions. A letter from Louisville, dated the 23d instant says: The latest news from Bragg's army in rather of an encouraging nature, tending to the conviction that instead of moving on this city, he has been frightened by the combinations making ag
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
iastical character; and to impress favorably the minds of the people of Ireland and France towards the Union, he had used his best energies. Miscellaneous. Rev. James H. Crooke, colored, was shot and killed at West Farms, N. Y., on the 24th inst., by Mary H. Hodges, also colored, whom he had seduced. He was "emancipated" from this world's troubles before the "proclamation." Dr. Mackay, the New York correspondent of the London Times, says of the President of the United States that he writes English "that passes muster in America, but that would not be tolerated in a British school for young gentlemen." Rev. Mr. Bosserman and family, of Richmond, have arrived in Baltimore. It was rumored at Fortress Monroe, on Friday, that a rebel force, numbering from 18,000 to 20,000, was in the vicinity of Black water river. A collision occurred near York, Pa, on the 25th, killing some of the 32d Ohio, paroled at Harper's Ferry, and on their way to fight the Indians.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 7
teers, but also portions of the militia of the States by draft, in order to suppress the insurrection existing in the United States, and disloyal persons are not adequately restrained by the ordinary processes of law from hindering this measure, andand as a necessary measure for suppressing the same, all rebels and insurgents, their siders and abettors, within the United States, and all persons discour aging volunteer enlistments, resisting militia drafts, or guilty of any disloyal practice, affording aid and comfort to the rebels against the authority of the United States, shall be subject to martial law, and liable to trial and punishment by court-martial of military commissions. 2d. That the writ of habeas corpus is suspenore the "proclamation." Dr. Mackay, the New York correspondent of the London Times, says of the President of the United States that he writes English "that passes muster in America, but that would not be tolerated in a British school for young
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 7
two forces each equal to his own. I look upon the movement made by Bragg as certainly forced upon hi . After his movement in force to Munfordsville, and the reduction of that point, Bragg had no road to get South without fighting; for while he was engaged at Munfordsville Buell moved up to Cave City, and made a movement on the Glasgow road. There no longer remained an egress for him. What was more natural, then, than to avoid him, and push forward to some point by which he could reach Central Kentucky, and find the only available outlet from the State east of Glasgow? On a careful examination of the map it will be found that it is only by getting north of Muldraugh's Hills, and taking the turnpike road to Danville, Stanford, and London, that Bragg's large force can get out of the State at Cumberland Gap. It is surmised that Bragg is trying to avail himself of this outlet, and he proposes making an effort to destroy this army in the meantime. Should he approach this city by the
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