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el, which is awaiting their arrival at Charleston. It is reported that three of the steamers on the Clyde — The Trounce, the and the Clydesdale — have been sold to the Government. The Paris correspondent of the New York Herald, writing on the 16th, says: Since the arrival of the news of the first battle at Run there has not been so much excitement by dispatches from the United States as was the result of those which reached here on Saturday evening up to the 4th of September. We wh reverses do not teach the North to reconsider its course, we do not see how political wisdom is to be learned or political error retrieved. The French Emperor on recognition. The Paris correspondent of the London Times, writing on the 16th ult., says: The continued successes of the Confederates, and the decided superiority which their armies, and, still more, their Generals, seem to have established over those of their antagonists, naturally embolden the hopes of the Southern sym
subsequent regret. Should it delay the concession much longer, the result humorously fore shadowed by a New York writer may actually occur in the restoration of the Union by conquest on the part of the South. Already President Lincoln has lost much of his advantage in treating for a frontier, and a few more defeats like those sustained by Gen. Pope, may almost leave him without a frontier for which to treat. Revolutionary Symptoms in the Federal States. The London Globe, of the 17th instant, remarks that dissatisfaction with the Government at Washington can no longer be suppressed. There are something like three Governments in the field. The New York War Committee cames out with a proposal to raise two armies, if not with the consent of the Washington Government, then without it. Then what means the council of the New England Governors at Providence? These men represent the abolitionist States. Do they, too, contemplate some course independent of the Federal Government?
The latest from Europe. comments of the English press on Pope's defeat — Calls for intervention — the bravery of the south an object of admiration — the emancipation policy condemned, &c., &c. The news by the Angle Saxon, from Liverpool on the 18th, is highly interesting. The Liverpool Telegraph says that besides the commissions committed to other ship builders by the rebel Government, which are being pushed forward with all possible dispatch, a large iron plated ram it being constructed on the river Mersey, without any attempt being made at concealment. This ran will be of the most formidable character, and will attempt to run the blockade at Charleston. The journal says that a vessel is lying at Liverpool, taking in a cargo of iron plates, destined for Southern vessel, which is awaiting their arrival at Charleston. It is reported that three of the steamers on the Clyde — The Trounce, the and the Clydesdale — have been sold to the Government. The Paris
September 1st (search for this): article 1
o give increased force to the claim to acknowledgment by European Powers of the independence of a country which has already shown itself so competent to maintain its rights and fight its own battles. The battles at Manassas — the position of the Confederates. [From the London Post, (Government Organ,) September 16.] Three days afterwards the Army of Virginia lay behind the fortifications of Washington. They were fairly beaten back and driven in there by the Confederates, for on the 1st and 2d of September the Southern forces followed up their successes and attacked the divisions which were defending the rear of the Northern army. In those minor battles the North lost two Generals, Kearney and Stevens, who were both killed; and such alarm was instilled in the minds of the Federal commanders that they resolved to seek safety behind the earthworks of Washington. They removed the planks from the chain bridge at Washington, and the late besiegers of Richmond are now contented
September 2nd (search for this): article 1
ed force to the claim to acknowledgment by European Powers of the independence of a country which has already shown itself so competent to maintain its rights and fight its own battles. The battles at Manassas — the position of the Confederates. [From the London Post, (Government Organ,) September 16.] Three days afterwards the Army of Virginia lay behind the fortifications of Washington. They were fairly beaten back and driven in there by the Confederates, for on the 1st and 2d of September the Southern forces followed up their successes and attacked the divisions which were defending the rear of the Northern army. In those minor battles the North lost two Generals, Kearney and Stevens, who were both killed; and such alarm was instilled in the minds of the Federal commanders that they resolved to seek safety behind the earthworks of Washington. They removed the planks from the chain bridge at Washington, and the late besiegers of Richmond are now contented with the hope
September 15th (search for this): article 1
rs,) and some Indigenous corps it is proposed to form, the French force would not be lets than that stated in the Paris journal already quoted. Of course, if it prove to be thus, many persons will be hard to persuade that such an expedition, so much larger than is necessary to accomplish French objects in Mexico, has not been formed also with a view to future eventualities or contingencies in the Anglo-American conflict. An emancipation proclamation called for. [From the London Star, Sept. 15. The crisis of the civil war has come at length.--The "stunning defeat" for which Mr. Wendell Phillips prayed has certainly been inflicted. * * The war has but arrived at the point which we have anticipated as the alternative to the adoption of the policy necessary to secure success, and even to justify the contest. From the first we have held that it were better to separate than to hold the South to an allegiance which could only be made a willing allegiance by the virtual submission
September 16th (search for this): article 1
e, Confederates--recognition to be won by themselves. [From the London Times, Sept. 16.] The people of the Confederate States have made themselves famous. If thece.--the blockade ought to be raised. [From the London Herald, (Derby organ,) Sept. 16.] There is a degree of Inhumanely in the attitude on this question assumedd States--the alleged tyranny of the Lincoln Cabinet. [From the London Times, Sept. 16.] There is not one-tenth part of the liberty of opinion or discussion in r Manchester Joins in the cry for the rebels. [From the Manchester Guardian,Sept. 16.] Meanwhile, the Confederates must be congratulated on having fully vindic.--Napoleon's troops in Mexico may Operate in American difficulties. [Paris (Sept. 16th.) Correspondence of the London Times.] In the way of news from America, whe position of the Confederates. [From the London Post, (Government Organ,) September 16.] Three days afterwards the Army of Virginia lay behind the fortificatio
September 17th (search for this): article 1
rt not of bravery but of madness. An English opinion of a slaveholding nation. [From the London News, (Abolition.) Sept. 17.] The friends of secession in this country are justified in celebrating the military exploits of the Southern army. pinion of the cotton Districts on recognition of the South--a strong Voice from Liverpool. [From the Liverpool Courier, Sept. 17.] The sum and substance of the startling intelligence brought by the Europa is included in a few brief words--"The rt the fate of the Union. The Retreat to Washington--English views of a Rising in Maryland. [From the London Times, Sept. 17.] These operations, now distinctly presented to our view, reflect high credit on the Confederate arms, and show the iossibly relieve us from our suspense. The "Inkling" of peace in Liverpool. [From the London Times, (city article,) Sept. 17.] The last accounts from America have created a strong impression among many of the cotton operators at Liverpo
April, 9 AD (search for this): article 1
Southern vessel, which is awaiting their arrival at Charleston. It is reported that three of the steamers on the Clyde — The Trounce, the and the Clydesdale — have been sold to the Government. The Paris correspondent of the New York Herald, writing on the 16th, says: Since the arrival of the news of the first battle at Run there has not been so much excitement by dispatches from the United States as was the result of those which reached here on Saturday evening up to the 4th of September. We were in hopes at first that as has usually been the last for the past year, the first dispatches might have been of an exaggerated character, to be very much modified by subsequent once and by the from the journals. We have had, this time, news that our troops have been driven in on Washington, confirmed by the journals which have since arrived. Upon receiving it Mr. Slidell immediately sought and ob an interview with M. Thoubenel, in which he again urged upon him immediate
Americans (search for this): article 1
of Inhumanely in the attitude on this question assumed by the European Powers which seems to us to call for the sternest censure. We are standing with folded arms and a placid expression on our faces, while America is being made in desert, and Americans, most valiantly, are hacking one another to pieces. Will it advantage us at all that the spirit of the country should be broken, a whole generation of young men slain or maimed in the cruelest of unjust wars, and the benefits that the might ry should be so directly visited? The cause of this war is a thinners, a fatal infatuation. Let us not be content with muttering this to ourselves; let us tell the Americans what we think of it, and cry — hold! while something yet remains for Americans to fight about. If our Government will not do this we must held them in part responsible for the continuance of this plague of civil war — this standing outrage and against God and man. The same paper says the blockade has not in anythi
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