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Perhaps the President waited longer than he should, [laughter,] but that very hesitancy gave the measure finally its fullest force. He did not believe there was one man in the Cabinet who did not think that, if we put down the rebellion, we must put down slavery. There never was a moment since the war began when there was not a tendency to give the contest this aspect. He had the utmost confidence in our success. The rebels had exhausted the goods they bought of the New York merchants in 1860 and cheated them out of in 1861. [Laughter.] He did not believe the rebels were getting many supplies from Europe, for they were bad paymasters at best, and this was not their best time [Laughter and applause.] He believed that by next spring we should be a united, free and happy people. [Applause.] He believed that the South would try and patch up a peace before January. The English, who saw nothing but defeat for us, forgot that we were reinforcing the Army of the Potomac with 600,0
Latest from the North.the battle at Corinth. We have received New York papers of Monday last October "> They contain brief dispatches a great Federal victory at Corinth. A Washington states that the Confederates the instant under Price and attached at but with great slaughter, and retreated, dead and wounded on the fled. The dispatch "our forces are in full pursuit." A dispatch the 5th, says: On Saturday morning General Price, attacked General right, while Generals with great determination. At was penetrated and the Corinth House, near the centre They at the point of the bayonet.--General his column over an abatts on the yards of They at the time to a scathing and driven back by a The half past 11, when the the Batchie river. The died and wounded on either side Gen. was killed and Gen. Oglesby was wounded. Colonels Smith, are wounded. larger than ours. We have taken between seven hundred and other thousan
nger than he should, [laughter,] but that very hesitancy gave the measure finally its fullest force. He did not believe there was one man in the Cabinet who did not think that, if we put down the rebellion, we must put down slavery. There never was a moment since the war began when there was not a tendency to give the contest this aspect. He had the utmost confidence in our success. The rebels had exhausted the goods they bought of the New York merchants in 1860 and cheated them out of in 1861. [Laughter.] He did not believe the rebels were getting many supplies from Europe, for they were bad paymasters at best, and this was not their best time [Laughter and applause.] He believed that by next spring we should be a united, free and happy people. [Applause.] He believed that the South would try and patch up a peace before January. The English, who saw nothing but defeat for us, forgot that we were reinforcing the Army of the Potomac with 600,000 men. Our army was stronger th
ad the utmost confidence in our success. The rebels had exhausted the goods they bought of the New York merchants in 1860 and cheated them out of in 1861. [Laughter.] He did not believe the rebels were getting many supplies from Europe, for they were bad paymasters at best, and this was not their best time [Laughter and applause.] He believed that by next spring we should be a united, free and happy people. [Applause.] He believed that the South would try and patch up a peace before January. The English, who saw nothing but defeat for us, forgot that we were reinforcing the Army of the Potomac with 600,000 men. Our army was stronger than the rebels, in its intelligence and its capacity. [Applause.] As to the President's proclamation, we heard predictions that the army wouldn't stand it — the officers would resign. He didn't see it. [Laughter.] Where was the man who had resigned? There were some whom he washed would resign, but didn't. The proclamation simplified the work o
Horace Greeley (search for this): article 1
on the 21 instant, at which resolutions were adopted stigmatizing the Democratic State ticket as "the representative of treason at the North." The Star Spangled Banner, and a celebrated negro retrain called "Old Shandy," having been sung, Mr. Horace Greeley took the stand: Mr. Greeley said he had not met three men together since the emancipation proclamation who were not happy. Europe had seen both the North and South fighting to sustain slavery, and could see no difference between us. BMr. Greeley said he had not met three men together since the emancipation proclamation who were not happy. Europe had seen both the North and South fighting to sustain slavery, and could see no difference between us. But the issue was now between the Union and slavery, and slavery must go down. [Applause] Every man must admit that our chances of success are greater than they were before the proclamation. We had begun to strike our enemy in his weakest point. Perhaps the President waited longer than he should, [laughter,] but that very hesitancy gave the measure finally its fullest force. He did not believe there was one man in the Cabinet who did not think that, if we put down the rebellion, we must put
ry important one just at this Following up the triumphs at South and the success movements of Buell and Morgan in Kentucky it will have a greatly of Bragg's and South's army in Kentucky forcesith massive silver ornaments and enveloped in "his country's flag" The letter says: Major General Buell yesterday announced the death of Major General Nelson in feeling and befitting terms. Hich she was crafting. On more than one battle field he was his gallant reported that General Buell retains his command on the recommendation of General Thomas and nearly all the other divisios from Nashville date the 23d.--Nashville was then in our possession. Fully 200,000 letters for Buell's army are said to have accumulated at Louisville, and 30,000 letters to have been sent yesterdaW. H. Polk, of Tennessee, is said to assert that Bragg has only 25,000, with which he frightened Buell and the Generals in command at Louisville. The invader's scout for pickets are within twelve mi
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): article 1
are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreet is making his stay at the residence of Charles J. Faulkner at Martinsburg; Gen. Lee stops with Dr. Hammond at North Mountain, and "Stonewall" Jackson continues about "in spots," as heretofore. General Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has returned to the city from his onerous not to say dangerous. Northwestern trip to pacify the Indiana. He reports that the Chippewas are quiet, and have agreed to pay damages for the property of the Government that they have taken. There was at one time an apprehension that the Northwestern Indiana would make common cause with the Sioux, in rebelling against the Government authority. They see
of all measures aimed at the rebellion, were referred to appropriate committees, instructed to report on Thursday next. The red flannel badge. The following paragraph is from the Baltimore American: Some time since the lamented General Kearney ordered his officers to wear, sewed on their caps, a square bit of red flannel, that he might the more easily recognise them. They have determined to adopt this red badge as an honorary distinction, and their now commander General Stoneman, approves of it. Field and staff officers wear it on the crown of their caps, line officers on the front of their caps, and privates on the right side. In the next fight in which they may be engaged, Kearney's men, with their badge, will avenge their beloved commander. The New York Stock Market. The New York Herald, of the 6th, says there was no abatement of speculative excitement on Saturday, and adds: At the first board there was an advance of 3 per cent in Missouri 6 s, and 2
is there more to dispute any advance from our side than to make any demonstration upon our position. The fact seems to be that the rebels are terribly scared in this quarter, but are resorting to the old Manassas game of holding a superior force in check by making a bold show of resistance. All the rebel troops in the vicinity of the Blackwater are green conscripts hastily pushed forward, and will hardly stand fire if assailed by our formidable force. Under the able administration of Maj. Gen. Peck the condition of affairs in Suffolk has greatly improved. The soldiers are better cared for and the place generally has become more confident and comfortable. Gen. Ferry had too much regard for the ' key in the wood pile,' and carried his Tribune so far as to disgust not only the army bu citizens of the town generally, everybody supposing that Gen. F. was so particularly attached to Sambo as to have no kind of regard for white men at al in a subordinate position, however, abolition Ge
pbraid us for being slow, out she should remember the history of the Crimes They forget the battle of Alma, on September 14, and didn't capture Sebastopol until a year afterward, and after losing more men than they originally landed. We had fought better than the Allies in the Crimes, and should fight it out regardless of what Europe said [Applause.] Our first duty in sustaining the Government was to sustain its friends in the State canvass — the nominees of the Syracuse Convention on the 24th inst. He closed with an eulogy upon the American flag. After an address from Mr. Francis Lambert, the meeting adjourned. The difficulty with Gen. Sigel. The Washington Star announces officially that Gen. Sigel but requested to be relieved from his command. This man is, next to the leader of the German in the United States. with the failure to assign to his corps certain regiments recently raised which the Governors of the States in which they were raised promised to pen
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