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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Stonewall (search for this): article 1
chusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreet is making his stay at the residence of Charles J. Faulkner at Martinsburg; Gen. Lee stops with Dr. Hammond at North Mountain, and "Stonewall" Jackson continues about "in spots," as heretofore. General Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has returned to the city from his onerous not to say dangerous. Northwestern trip to pacify the Indiana. He reports that the Chippewas are quiet, and have agreed to pay damages for the property of the Government that they have taken. There was at one time an apprehension that the Northwestern Indiana would make common cause with the Sioux, in rebelling against the Government authority.
is a very important one just at this Following up the triumphs at South and the success movements of Buell and Morgan in Kentucky it will have a greatly of Bragg's and South's army in Kentucky forces in Arkansas, and Lee's troops the Virginia. Thus the is Now with a million of fresh men in the what is there for therevalent here that General was attached by Kirby Smith a rebel force, at to-day, and driven This last is entirely dis Danville for Lexington on Tuesday. Bragg was expected at Danville on He threatened to send every man who the rebel army to the north of the The rebels are cutting new roads from Bardstown to Springt yesterday from this post office. The rebel army in Kentucky is now computed at about 80,000. However, Col. W. H. Polk, of Tennessee, is said to assert that Bragg has only 25,000, with which he frightened Buell and the Generals in command at Louisville. The invader's scout for pickets are within twelve miles of the city. O
"A peace must be conquered. Prosecute this war with all energy and an activity which assume that it can only terminate by the utter annihilation of the rebel army, and the destruction of all its resource. " Compliment to McClellan. Gen. Halleck seems to be afraid that "Little Mac" don't exactly understand that he has on a victory, and writes him the following assurance of the fact: Washington, D. C., Sept. 30, 1862. Maj. Gen. McClellan, Commanding, &c.: General: Your repion of the enemy from the loyal State of Maryland, are creditable alike to the troops and to the officers who commanded them. A grateful country, while mourning the lamented dead, will not be unmindful of the honors due to the living. H. W. Halleck Gen. in-Chief. Gen. McClellan has issued an order against pillaging, as "we are now occupying a country inhabited by a loyal population, who look to us for the preservation of order and discipline, instead of suffering our men to go about i
September 14th (search for this): article 1
er.] England stood ready to take any side of any question in order to injure this country. Mr. Roebuck stated the true reason of this feeling when he said that it was jealousy of our growing power; and in that statement Mr. Mosburk fully represented the British people. All we asked was for Europe to let us alone, and we would take care that Europe did let us alone England might upbraid us for being slow, out she should remember the history of the Crimes They forget the battle of Alma, on September 14, and didn't capture Sebastopol until a year afterward, and after losing more men than they originally landed. We had fought better than the Allies in the Crimes, and should fight it out regardless of what Europe said [Applause.] Our first duty in sustaining the Government was to sustain its friends in the State canvass — the nominees of the Syracuse Convention on the 24th inst. He closed with an eulogy upon the American flag. After an address from Mr. Francis Lambert, the meeting a
rely dis Danville for Lexington on Tuesday. Bragg was expected at Danville on He threatened to send every man who the rebel army to the north of the The rebels are cutting new roads from Bardstown to Springfield and Lexington. The Louisville special dispatch of the 2d instant, concerning the lasting of 500 rebels by division. was incorrect. It was doubtless based on the that an entire Georgia regiment of cavalry was captured in the early part of last week by Lieutenant Colonel Howard of the second commanding his own and the Second and Kentucky, which surrounded and completely surprised the rebels at breakfast, who without the resistance. Col. the captured regiment, is of the Confederate Peace Washington. These prisoners From McClellan's army. A dispatch from McClellan's headquarters, dated the says that a company of the 54th Pennsylvania, who were guarding the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Pan-Pan, about half way between and Cumberland,
ry's flag" The letter says: Major General Buell yesterday announced the death of Major General Nelson in feeling and befitting terms. History will honor Gen. Nelson as one of the first to organize, by his own individual exertions, a military force in Kentucky, his native State, to rescue here from the vortex of rebellion, toward which she was crafting. On more than one battle field he was his gallant reported that General Buell retains his command on the recommendation of General Thomas and nearly all the other division officers of the Army of the Ohio. Generals D. and Boyle are to command divisions. General Rousseau's splendid division, comprising thereon regiments of about 6,200 men, and four batteries, paraded our streets yesterday. Latest papers from Nashville date the 23d.--Nashville was then in our possession. Fully 200,000 letters for Buell's army are said to have accumulated at Louisville, and 30,000 letters to have been sent yesterday from this post of
dless of what Europe said [Applause.] Our first duty in sustaining the Government was to sustain its friends in the State canvass — the nominees of the Syracuse Convention on the 24th inst. He closed with an eulogy upon the American flag. After an address from Mr. Francis Lambert, the meeting adjourned. The difficulty with Gen. Sigel. The Washington Star announces officially that Gen. Sigel but requested to be relieved from his command. This man is, next to the leader of the German in the United States. with the failure to assign to his corps certain regiments recently raised which the Governors of the States in which they were raised promised to pend to him. No such agreement or arrangement between those functionaries and Gen. Sigel could be binding on the Department, which must necessarily assign troops as they come into the service just where the exigencies of the moment require them most imperatively. We are persuaded that a little reflection will open th
Washington (search for this): article 1
Union of ours, and I also return thanks not only to the soldiers, but to the good citizens of Maryland, and to all the good men and women in this land, for their devotion to our glorious cause. I say this without any in my heart to those who may have done otherwise. May our children and our children's children, to a thousand generations, continue to enjoy the benefits conferred upon us by a united country, and have cause yet to rejoice under those glorious institutions bequeathed us by Washington and his compeers. Now, my friends soldiers and citizens, I can only say once more, farewell. At the conclusion of this speech, which was delivered standing at the end of the car, the President entered amid the acclamations of the crowd, and the train moved off. Once again he appeared, waving his hat, and continued doing so until the train was lost in the distance. "Three cheers for the hope of America," was called out by one stentorian voice in front of Mrs. Ramsey's house, and
in command at Louisville. The invader's scout for pickets are within twelve miles of the city. Our inner line of trenches is within the corporation limits, and crosses our once beautiful cemetery Many graves are torn up, and tomo-stones and monuments thrown down. The stern necessities and terrible realities of war surround and press upon us. The invader a Legislature meets to-day at Danville.--We are concerned about the safety of General G. W. Morgan's command. He abandoned the Gap on the 25th. The Journal to-day says the Government should proceed to draft at once for the balance, and then call for 400,000 more to be held in reserve. "A peace must be conquered. Prosecute this war with all energy and an activity which assume that it can only terminate by the utter annihilation of the rebel army, and the destruction of all its resource. " Compliment to McClellan. Gen. Halleck seems to be afraid that "Little Mac" don't exactly understand that he has on a victory, and
ain unfilled. Most of the young men of this region are now serving in the rebel army. Geo. D. Spencer, an officer of the Criminal Court of this district, was to- day by order of Chief Detective Baker, on the charge of disloyalty. In conversation he endorsed the action of the rebel Government in raising the black flag, and said it should have been done long ago. He will be sent to the Old Capitol prison. Exchange of prisoners — Affairs at Suffolk A letter dated Norfolk, the 3d inst., says Lieut. Col. has been entrusted with the arrangement of the exchange and that "the next of the Commissioners will prove very important." my is known to have massed considerable force at but the indications are that he is there more to dispute any advance from our side than to make any demonstration upon our position. The fact seems to be that the rebels are terribly scared in this quarter, but are resorting to the old Manassas game of holding a superior force in check by m
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