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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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T. A. R. Nelson (search for this): article 1
ing men into their ranks under the Conscription law of the Southern Confederacy. From Louisville. A letter from Louisville, dated the 1st, says that Bull Nelson was buried there the day before, with great pump, his coffin being mounted with massive silver ornaments and enveloped in "his country's flag" The letter says: Major General Buell yesterday announced the death of Major General Nelson in feeling and befitting terms. History will honor Gen. Nelson as one of the first to organize, by his own individual exertions, a military force in Kentucky, his native State, to rescue here from the vortex of rebellion, toward which she was crafting. Gen. Nelson as one of the first to organize, by his own individual exertions, a military force in Kentucky, his native State, to rescue here from the vortex of rebellion, toward which she was crafting. On more than one battle field he was his gallant reported that General Buell retains his command on the recommendation of General Thomas and nearly all the other division officers of the Army of the Ohio. Generals D. and Boyle are to command divisions. General Rousseau's splendid division, comprising thereon regiments o
George B. McClellan (search for this): article 1
ce Washington. These prisoners From McClellan's army. A dispatch from McClellan's headeen sent after the retreating rebels. Gen. McClellan has sent the following letter to Gov. of ery respectfully and sincerely, yours, George B. McClellan, Major-General, U. S. Army. Sous said that he is perfectly satisfied with Gen. McClellan and his army. He passed two days and nigh to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreetst the rebels. Private advises from General McClellan's headquarters assure us that the Presidmon toast is "Lincoln's proclamation, little McClellan, Burnside, and the Union army." The enthusian of all its resource. " Compliment to McClellan. Gen. Halleck seems to be afraid that "L Washington, D. C., Sept. 30, 1862. Maj. Gen. McClellan, Commanding, &c.: General: Your re living. H. W. Halleck Gen. in-Chief. Gen. McClellan has issued an order against pillaging, as [1 more...]
the 24th inst. He closed with an eulogy upon the American flag. After an address from Mr. Francis Lambert, the meeting adjourned. The difficulty with Gen. Sigel. The Washington Star announces officially that Gen. Sigel but requested to be relieved from his command. This man is, next to the leader of the German inGen. Sigel but requested to be relieved from his command. This man is, next to the leader of the German in the United States. with the failure to assign to his corps certain regiments recently raised which the Governors of the States in which they were raised promised to pend to him. No such agreement or arrangement between those functionaries and Gen. Sigel could be binding on the Department, which must necessarily assign trGen. Sigel could be binding on the Department, which must necessarily assign troops as they come into the service just where the exigencies of the moment require them most imperatively. We are persuaded that a little reflection will open the eyes of Gen. S. to this fact, as well as to the further fact that the President and War Department have at all times done every possible thing to gratify him. The troub
Christian (search for this): article 1
t of disunion, which also threatened to forever divide a united Church. He then proceeded to observe that our country was now contending with one of he most devastating rebellions that ever cursed a nation. He said he would view some of the causes of this crisis.--he would not undertake to consider the political causes. We had, as a nation, by pride and vain boasting. With an our boasting of religions belief there was, verify less real religion in this than in my nation prot to be Christian, in the world. The name of God was profaned the Sabbath was desecrated. Our intellectual men have become refined, religious philosophers. It was no wonder that, in the midst of such a state of things, men sought out methods to avoid the offence of their own actions, and that God's judgments should fall upon us. Corruption had become so common that it was now a matter of course. There were to-day thousands crying to God crying against the practices which have brought all this offering
John Morgan (search for this): article 1
nt one just at this Following up the triumphs at South and the success movements of Buell and Morgan in Kentucky it will have a greatly of Bragg's and South's army in Kentucky forces in Arkansa West--reported defeat of --the battle in &C. A dispatch Portsmouth, Ohio, says that Gen. John Morgan, with 1,000 Confederates, was defeated by the county Home Guard, at Olive Hill, Ky., . It says: After several skirmishing Morgan was several of his men killed. Morgan then retreated toward the river, burning thirty on his way. Last night Morgan Meanwhile Col. went and broughMorgan then retreated toward the river, burning thirty on his way. Last night Morgan Meanwhile Col. went and brought up 300 of the 117th A dispatch Louisville says the Confederate, had evacuated Baldstown, Ky., on the evening of the 4th instant, and it was shortly after by the Federal of corps. The disMorgan Meanwhile Col. went and brought up 300 of the 117th A dispatch Louisville says the Confederate, had evacuated Baldstown, Ky., on the evening of the 4th instant, and it was shortly after by the Federal of corps. The dispatch, which is dated the 5th, says: A has been prevalent here that General was attached by Kirby Smith a rebel force, at to-day, and driven This last is entirely dis Danville for Lex
e in full pursuit." A dispatch the 5th, says: On Saturday morning General Price, attacked General right, while Generals with great determination. At was penetrated and the Corinth House, near the centre They at the point of the bayonet.--General his column over an abatts on the yards of They at the time to a scathing and driven back by a The half past 11, when the the Batchie river. The died and wounded on either side Gen. was killed and Gen. Oglesby was wounded. Colonels Smith, are wounded. larger than ours. We have taken between seven hundred and other thousand people not including the wounded.--The Railroad is not The telegraph line has been repaired to General reached on Saturday to the with a large force General early this morning to to-day General of the Batchie river and The retreating. Their is very a large. General a message here from Column a large of wounded. was killed
ral Nelson in feeling and befitting terms. History will honor Gen. Nelson as one of the first to organize, by his own individual exertions, a military force in Kentucky, his native State, to rescue here from the vortex of rebellion, toward which she was crafting. On more than one battle field he was his gallant reported that General Buell retains his command on the recommendation of General Thomas and nearly all the other division officers of the Army of the Ohio. Generals D. and Boyle are to command divisions. General Rousseau's splendid division, comprising thereon regiments of about 6,200 men, and four batteries, paraded our streets yesterday. Latest papers from Nashville date the 23d.--Nashville was then in our possession. Fully 200,000 letters for Buell's army are said to have accumulated at Louisville, and 30,000 letters to have been sent yesterday from this post office. The rebel army in Kentucky is now computed at about 80,000. However, Col. W. H. Polk
lly misleading those who hear them, and betraying their country to its fall. The political meetings at the North. We continue our accounts of the political meetings at the North. Another Republican meeting was held in New York on the 21 instant, at which resolutions were adopted stigmatizing the Democratic State ticket as "the representative of treason at the North." The Star Spangled Banner, and a celebrated negro retrain called "Old Shandy," having been sung, Mr. Horace Greeley toooyed in Colt's armory were among the drafted soldiers in Hartford. The Government ordered their discharge from the military service, and sent them back to the armory. There were one hundred and seventeen deaths in New Orleans during the week ending on the 21st ult., and one of the persons deceased was one hundred and seventeen years old. Fifty-nine men are all that remain of the Second Wisconsin regiment, that left the Stole but little over a year ago nearly eleven hundred strong.
Longstreet (search for this): article 1
the statements published in the papers as unqualifiedly false. It is reported that the new nine months regiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreet is making his stay at the residence of Charles J. Faulkner at Martinsburg; Gen. Lee stops with Dr. Hammond at North Mountain, and "Stonewall" Jackson continues about "in spots," as heretofore. General Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has returned to the city from his onerous not to say dangerous. Northwestern trip to pacify the Indiana. He reports that the Chippewas are quiet, and have agreed to pay damages for the property of the Government that they have taken. There was
General a message here from Column a large of wounded. was killed the United States of the sent at 3 P. M., on the following intelligence had bee there. of 40,000 men, attacked Gen. our troops, who manner. was killed at the head of his captured a large number of guns and prisoners. undoubtedly be completely destroyed The New York Herald, on these dispatch and repeats its the Southern States to return to the under Price and Van Dorn had been force in that vicinity, made up Corinth army. brought away from New Orleans and the new After their defeat at the rebels rapidly as possible all the forces they that neighborhood for the purpose of a sudden blow at Corinth, overweighting was securing that important. strategic plan for future operations. This on Friday last with forty thousand men, defeated and is a very important one just at this Following up the triumphs at South and the success movements of
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